Alata

Theatre
1 out of 5 stars
(1user review)
Alata

The first show at Yurakucho's newly opened Alternative Theatre, this non-verbal (or at least minimally verbal) performance follows the unusual path of one very usual office lady. One day, she bumps into the samurai Alata, who has accidentally time-travelled from the Sengoku (Warring States) period to Tokyo in 2020. Actor Yuki Saotome and all-round-performer-turned-street dancer Elina play the protagonists, while film director Shunichi Okamura will be guiding them through it all. Even if you don't understand Japanese, the creators have made sure there's enough enjoy, from projection mapping to swordsmanship, dancing and aerial acts.

Note: the sound volume is very high in the theatre, so consider bringing earplugs – especially if you're going with children.

Posted:

Average User Rating

1 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:0
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:1
LiveReviews|1
1 person listening

 This show is so horrible it's almost amusing. There are an endless number of sword fights, all of them exactly the same. The choreography doesn't change, even when the situation and music do. There's nothing faintly resembling a plot. The special effects -- some of which are pretty good -- are equally pointless. (In one scene the White Queen has her heart ripped out, but she makes a complete recovery by her next appearance. The heroine arrives on stage via a net attached to the ceiling; I have absolutely no idea what the significance was.) When we all thought the show was finally over, there is a completely inexplicable scene where the samurai fights a bunch of cards.


But the biggest problem is this show doesn't know who's it's for. I was told it was targeting foreigners, yet the one consistent element -- pinky promises -- is unknown outside of Japan. The music is too loud for anyone over 25 (and too loud for the speakers, which were crackling under the strain). At one point a tweet saying "maji -- FUCK!" appears, so that eliminates kids.


We concluded the target must be the same early 20's folks we saw on stage. It's going to be hard to fill the seats -- half of them were empty on the 2nd night since opening -- through a window that small.


Definitely give this one a miss.