Your favourite London art experiences

Time Out readers share their favourite ways to fill a day with art (and booze)

0

Comments

Add +

North, south, east, west… Time Out art fans have got London covered. Here they suggest locations for a fab fix of culture – and where to find a tipple to complete your perfect art experience.

  • Potter in Peckham

    photo: © Andy Keate

    Once synonymous with Del Boy’s Reliant Robin, Peckham has emerged from the shadow of the Trotters' tower block with an exuberant art scene. Skint students and eager art graduates have embraced Peckham as the perfect platform to exhibit art. It’s here, in my neighbourhood, you’ll find artists who have seized spaces ranging from car parks to railway arches and, in the case of Gallery 38b (38b Peckham Rye, SE15 4JR), even transformed their living room into a showroom. Peckham makes art accessible to all, as venues like The Montpelier pub pulverise the stuffy stereotype of the pristine white cube space, incorporating artwork alongside good food and good times by the pint glass. Until September 30, the brilliant exhibition Bold Tendencies allows you to quench your cultural thirst with performances and installations in Peckham multi-storey car park (95A Rye Lane, SE15 4ST). Enjoy a tipple from the Frank’s Café pop-up on the roof as you gaze through Ruth Proctor’s fabulous, fluttering mask sculpture (pictured) that perfectly frames a vista of central London.

    Emma Austin, 23, is a graduate from Peckham. She was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

    Potter in Peckham
  • Go Italian in Islington

    photo: © Estorick Collection

    Housed in a beautiful Georgian building in Canonbury is the Estorick Collection (39a Canonbury Square, N1 2AN). Britain’s only gallery devoted to modern Italian art, it’s a charming little venue arranged over three floors, where it feels like you’re viewing art in a private home rather than a museum. The collection belonged to Eric Estorick (1913-93), an American sociologist and writer, and his wife Salome. Estorick sounds like a cross between esoteric and historic – which is appropriate as the collection manages to be both. The permanent exhibition focuses on Futurist works by major names, like Gino Severini’s stunning ‘The Boulevard’ (1910-11) and Carlo Carrà’s bustling ‘Leaving the Theatre’ (1910-11). Keeping things Italian, I like to finish off with an Aperol Spritz and some tasty pasta in the pretty walled courtyard café. It makes for a perfect afternoon.

    Christina Michalos is a barrister from Islington. She was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

    Go Italian in Islington
  • Become art in Bethnal Green

    photo: © DegreeArt

    Littered with galleries, studios, and street art, Vyner Street celebrates London’s grassroots art scene. A highlight is Lime Wharf (Vyner St, E2 9DJ; until Oct 12), where the Adhocracy exhibition takes you into a mechanical wonderland of recycled, odds and ends. This quirky little street welcomes all types of art forms and people. Celebrating this is the Ellie Young Live Portrait Studio, which is on at DegreeArt (12A Vyner Street, E2 9DG; until October 6), where you can have your portrait painted and be part of the exhibition. Make sure you book your slot in advance if you want to become a work of art. On the first Thursday of each month, for Time Out First Thursdays, Vyner Street turns into a cultural hub with droves of people perusing the shows and spilling out on to the street. Enjoy a cheeky wine or two, courtesy of the galleries, as you take it all in.

    Hannah Shakir, 28, is a social media consultant from Kingston upon Thames. She was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

    Become art in Bethnal Green
  • Gaze in awe in Greenwich

    image: © Old Royal Naval College

    A walk through Greenwich Park to the marvellous and unique Painted Hall, situated within the Old Royal Naval College, is beautiful at any time of year, but especially charming in autumn. Start at the top of the Park, at the Blackheath Gate, and walk all the way straight towards General Wolfe statue which is just on top of the hill where Canary Wharf glass towers contrast with the stunning architecture of the Naval College buildings. Such power and beauty all in one. From General Wolfe walk all the way down the Park towards the river, arriving at the Painted Hall – built for injured seamen by Sir Christopher Wren and painted by the genius that was Sir James Thornhill.  Once there, take time to appreciate the beauty of this gem!

    Erminia Yardley, 48, is a PA from south-east London. She was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

    Gaze in awe in Greenwich
  • Catch new art in Chelsea

    © Saatchi Gallery

    One of my favourite London places to visit is the Saatchi Gallery. Charles Saatchi has a taste for art that is often irreverent and challenging. Visiting his gallery, to be greeted by the faint, curious smell of petrol from Richard Wilson’s 20:50 installation in the basement, feels like crossing a border from the high street bustle of Kings Road into a world of sometimes bizarre and otherworldly twentyfirst-century curiosities. The gallery’s current exhibition, Paper, has some particularly impressive pieces, such as Marcelo Jácome’s 'Pianos-pipas n17', an exuberant, colourful paper mobile, which spans an entire gallery room.

    Ronan McFadden, 29, is a members' club concierge from Chelsea. He was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

    Catch new art in Chelsea
  • Sink a sundowner in the park

    image: © Serpentine Gallery

    If you’ve picnicked in Hyde Park over the summer, you can’t fail to have spotted the latest Serpentine Gallery Pavilion (Kensington Gardens, W2 3XA). The light and airy construction occupies the lawn in front of the gallery, its steel poles creating a lightweight, semi transparent lattice that magically appears to blend like a cloud into the landscape. Designed by renowned Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto, it’s a multi-purpose and social space that encourages you to explore and interact with its different levels – like a climbing frame for adults. Grab a glass of rosé from the café and find your spot to watch the sunset.

    Francesca Price, 27, administrator, Clapham. She was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

    Sink a sundowner in the park
  • Unearth museum treasure

    Image: © The Trustees of the British Museum

    Got an hour to while away? Little known to many, the British Museum runs free, eye-opener tours throughout the day. Their passionate and knowledgable volunteer guides discuss a handful of the most important objects in a single room. In 40 minutes or so, you can travel back in time and across the globe through the museum’s remarkable collection. Learn the secrets of the Pharaohs, discover the Greek and Roman gods, trace the Far Eastern dynasties and plug the gaps from your high school history lessons. Check the website for daily schedules.

    Robert Kidd, 30, is a project manager, blogger and ice cream maker from Bermondsey. He was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Unearth museum treasure

Potter in Peckham

photo: © Andy Keate

Once synonymous with Del Boy’s Reliant Robin, Peckham has emerged from the shadow of the Trotters' tower block with an exuberant art scene. Skint students and eager art graduates have embraced Peckham as the perfect platform to exhibit art. It’s here, in my neighbourhood, you’ll find artists who have seized spaces ranging from car parks to railway arches and, in the case of Gallery 38b (38b Peckham Rye, SE15 4JR), even transformed their living room into a showroom. Peckham makes art accessible to all, as venues like The Montpelier pub pulverise the stuffy stereotype of the pristine white cube space, incorporating artwork alongside good food and good times by the pint glass. Until September 30, the brilliant exhibition Bold Tendencies allows you to quench your cultural thirst with performances and installations in Peckham multi-storey car park (95A Rye Lane, SE15 4ST). Enjoy a tipple from the Frank’s Café pop-up on the roof as you gaze through Ruth Proctor’s fabulous, fluttering mask sculpture (pictured) that perfectly frames a vista of central London.

Emma Austin, 23, is a graduate from Peckham. She was selected to write this article as part of the Time Out Takeover – a special edition of the magazine written entirely by our readers.

Top art features

Latest art reviews

Find out what our critics make of London's new exhibitions

Top 10 art exhibitions

Our critics' pick of the must-see art exhibitions in town this season

London art exhibitions calendar

A handy calendar of the must-see art shows coming to town this year

Art interviews

We talk to the biggest names and emerging talent in the art world


Users say

0 comments