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Show of the week

The Boy Who Climbed Out of His Face

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Critics choice

Immersive theatre has become big business since the Shunt collective clambered from the recesses of the live art netherworld in the late ’90s, their improbably successful London Bridge club night and string of singular standalone shows whetting the public appetite for the slick blockbuster offerings of Punchdrunk and ‘You Me Bum Bum Train’.It’s probably doing Shunt a disservice to say that ‘The Boy Who Climbed Out of His Face’ is them coming back to collect some dues.

  1. The Jetty Greenwich Peninsula, SE10 0ER
  2. Tue Sep 2 - Sun Sep 28
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This week's theatre reviews

The Lion

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Critics choice
  1. St James Theatre 12 Palace St, SW1E 5JA
  2. Tue Sep 2 - Sun Sep 7
More info
  1. Courtyard Theatre 40 Pitfield St, N1 6EU
  2. Tue Sep 2 - Sun Sep 7
More info

Our World at War

  • Rated as: 3/5
  1. Tristan Bates Theatre Tower Street, Covent Garden, WC2H 9NP
  2. Mon Sep 1 - Sat Sep 6
More info

More London theatre reviews

Dogfight

  • Rated as: 2/5
  1. Southwark Playhouse Newington Causeway, SE1 6BD
  2. Mon Sep 1 - Sat Sep 13
More info

La Traviata

  • Rated as: 3/5
  1. Soho Theatre 21 Dean St, W1D 3NE
  2. Tue Sep 2 - Sun Sep 14
More info


Users say

5 comments
Elizabeth W
Elizabeth W

'Click!' at the Ophelia Theatre, Dalston is fantastic. A black comedy about two girls, Elle and Erm, who discover Elle has a magical superpower- the ability to be happy with just a click. Cannot recommend it highly enough. On until Sunday.

alan
alan

Just been to see Michael Finestein at the Palace theatre in London. The show which is part of Londons Festival of Cabaret also included Elaine Paige and Julian Ovenden. Michael was fantastic singing songs from the Great Amercian songbook from such writers as George and Ira Gershwin, Cole Porter and Jerry Herham. His talent and knowledge of this music is unsurpassed and he gave a truly wonderful performance.

Lia
Lia

I bought tickets to see Phantom of the Opera through lastminute.com that were advitised as second price stalls or royal grand stand for £50. The seats I was asigned were actually restriced view and were misrepresented on the lastminute site. When I complain to the company, with picture evidence, they refused to admit that the seats were ristricted view. Both the theatre and lastminute are selling these tickets and fooling the public. Be aware it will definately spoil your enjoyment!

Simon
Simon

How could Time Out give Birthday the honour of being show of the week?? Either the offering that week in London was abysmal, or the reviewer had been smoking something very mind altering, because certainly not even "easily pleased from Welwyn Garden City" could have honestly thought this play was good. It was second-rate British TV sitcom from the beginning to end. A laboured premise (if you'll excuse the pun), cardboard characterisation (e.g. midwife and registrar) and not one funny line in the whole play. A disaster! Don't go!

Tony
Tony

Duchess of Malfi- Old Vic: Visually stunning production but at 3 1/4 hours Mr. Spacey needs to talk to Jamie Lloyd - who seems like one of those children, who given too many toys for Christmas insists on playing with all of them at once. Webster's plotting is pedantic at best and it does not do to allow the audience to dwell on the leaps of time and logic that bedevil the text. Mr. Lloyd instists on explaining everything - slowly, directly and with deliberate focus. But what has kept the play in focus for the past 400 years is the language in all its beauty and epigramatic magnificence. Eve Best is wonderful and her transformations from duchess to lover, to mother, to victim and back to duchess again are clear and emotionally satisfying. Her brothers offer less clarity and compelling complexity. Harry Lloyd in particular, offered none of the perverted sexual power that drives him to lust after his sister while seeking her death to secure his release from his guilt. Understudy Adam Burton did well with the cardinal, but was perhaps more clinical than debauched. Fynbar Lynch brought an unexpected celtic quality to his Bosola and I missed his sense of ambition and secret power. His redemptive moments were however compelling and he held the narrative together beautifully. One last note - I think that the design elements of this play - while offering the standard Jacobean shape of curtained discovery space and multiple balconies made brilliant use of the theatres vast proscenium opening - truly magnificent.