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The best NYC parks

NYC parks offer verdant green spaces to relax, get some sun, picnic and more. Don’t miss any offerings with our guide.

Photograph: David Rosenzweig
Pelham Bay Park

Looking for some great things to do this weekend? New York City is full of public parks—in fact, there's nearly 1,700 parks and playgrounds in the five boroughs. But some NYC parks stand out above the rest. We've rounded up our favorites (where you're sure to see some of the best views in NYC) as well as spots to find New York City attractions, or pack a lunch and head to picnic spots or enjoy all the fun things to do in parks all over town.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to things to do in the summer in NYC

The 10 best NYC parks

1

Brooklyn Bridge Park

Some city parks—Central and Prospect, most obviously—were built to replicate rustic fields and preserve serene woodland. Brooklyn Bridge Park, however, was not—and that’s precisely why it has become so popular in the almost four years since it debuted. The project has transformed a chunk of the Brooklyn waterfront into a nearly 85-acre expanse; several sections house unique attractions such as Jane’s Carousel, a restored 1920s merry-go-round, and riverside esplanades with gorgeous Manhattan views. Pier 5, the first part of the park designed specifically for “active recreation,” opened in late 2012, complete with sports fields and a playground, and nearby Pier 2 has basketball courts and a skating rink. When summer rolls around, there's literary readings held in the open air, and outdoor movies play at sundown with one of the best views of the city just behind the screen.

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Brooklyn Heights
2

Central Park

To feel truly out of the city, head to the 38-acre wilderness area on the west side of the park known as the Ramble. The area has a storied history (as a gay cruising spot dating back to the turn of the last century, among other things), and it was even proposed as a recreational area in the mid-'50s. Thankfully, the winding trails, rocks and streams remain, seemingly waiting to be discovered. If you want plenty of sunshine and more of a social vibe, spread out a blanket at Sheep's Meadow, where groups playing guitar and frisbee and tanning topless are sprawled out as far as the eye can see.

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Central Park
3

Flushing Meadows–Corona Park

Give the city’s second-biggest park a day and it’ll show you the world: Its most enduring icon is the Unisphere, the mammoth steel globe created for the 1964 World’s Fair. But there’s also first-rate culture and sports at the New York Hall of Science, Arthur Ashe Stadium and Citi Field (depending on how the Mets are doing). The rolling green fields also encompass a zoo, a boating lake, a skate park, a barbecue area, playfields, and a $66 million aquatic and hockey center. In 2011, wetland plants such as swamp azalea and swamp milkweed were added to better handle the park’s water runoff, improving the catch-and-release fishing in Meadow Lake.

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Queens
4

Fort Greene Park

Both Brooklyn's first park and one of it's loveliest, Fort Greene Park plays host to the Soul Summit house-and-classics get-togethers on summertime Sunday afternoons.

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Fort Greene
5

The High Line

Opened in 2009, this highly anticipated outdoor park sits on the elevated infrastructure built on Manhattan's West Side in the 1930s. The final expansion of the park opened in 2014, and today sumptuous gardens and outdoor sculptures (that change with the seasons) adorn this magnificent walkway, which is also an excellent place to enjoy a view of the Hudson River. There's a food court with ice cream and wine, shallow pools to dip hot summer toes in and coveted lounge chairs to recline in on lazy days.

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Chelsea
6

Hudson River Park

This strip of waterfront park stretches from Battery Park to 59th Street, allowing you to walk, bike or skate while gazing at the Hudson River and New Jersey. There are flowers, benches, piers and lots of programs—including youth sports and kayak rides in the river. On Friday evenings, you can spot everything from people at lawnside boot camps to elderly singing groups belting it out next to a waterside piano.

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7

Inwood Hill Park

There’s a unique reward for trekking to the northernmost corner of Manhattan, where you’ll find enormous trees in the island’s last virgin forest. Much of the park has never been developed; due to its comparatively remote location, the land remained rural up until its 1916 purchase by the Parks Department, who decided to leave Inwood as natural as possible. As a result, the area remains very similar to the way the island was 500 years ago.

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Inwood
8

Pelham Bay Park

Jutting into the Long Island Sound with rocky outcroppings, marshy inlets and lush forest, Pelham Bay Park looks more like Maine than the Bronx. The city’s largest park at 2,766 acres—three times the size of Central Park—it takes hours to explore. Among the massive park's attractions are Orchard Beach, the Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum, and the recently renovated Pelham Bay Golf Course.

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The Bronx
9

Prospect Park

Urban visionaries Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, who most famously designed Central Park, also put their stamp on bucolic Prospect Park. Amenities like the Long Meadow and Nethermead offer plenty of space to pull up on a patch of grass and indulge in some people-watching, and the woodland expanse of the Ravine is a towering forest within bustling Brooklyn. But we also have to give props to Robert Moses: The controversial city planner was behind some of the park’s kid-friendly offerings, including the zoo and Wollman Rink, which throws decade-themed skating parties all summer long.

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Prospect Park
10

Riverside Park

This scenic four-mile waterfront park extends from 72nd to 158th Streets along the Hudson River in the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Facilities include sport courts, a skate park, bike paths on the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway and a public marina at 79th Street. Fans of You’ve Got Mail will recall that the promenade at 91st Street is the spot where Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan finally revealed their true identities.

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Morningside Heights

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Comments

6 comments
Megan
Megan

What about Randall's Island. That park is amazing now and has everything anyone could possibly want - it's like a vacation even if your there for a very sort time.

Gary
Gary

How about Gantry Park ( www.gantrypark.com ) in LIC? It's probably the most beautifully park in NYC with an unobstructed, spectacular view of the NYC skyline. Definitely should be on your list.

Nancy
Nancy

I agree except you left the Cloisters off the list!