Boundary-pushing Asian restaurants

Three groundbreaking restaurants that changed the way New Yorkers think about Far East eats.

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  • Photograph: Marianne Rafter

    Momofuku Noodle Bar

    Momofuku Noodle Bar

  • Momofuku Noodle Bar

    Momofuku Noodle Bar

  • Momofuku Noodle Bar

    Momofuku Noodle Bar

  • Photograph: Marianne Rafter

    Kin Shop

    Kin Shop

  • Photograph: Marianne Rafter

    Kin Shop

    Kin Shop

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Red Farm

    RedFarm

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Red Farm

    Red Farm

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Red Farm

    Red Farm

Photograph: Marianne Rafter

Momofuku Noodle Bar

Momofuku Noodle Bar

Momofuku Noodle Bar
In 2004, David Chang opened this tiny ramen house, serving ambitious Asian-inflected fare—a finely tuned mesh of Japanese, Korean and other cuisines. The trendsetting joint helped usher in a new era of dining, where casual digs accompanied cutting-edge eats. Seven years later, Noodle Bar continues to turn out buzzworthy chow. 171 First Ave between 10th and 11th Sts (212-777-7773)

Kin Shop
You won't find run-of-the-mill pad thai at Harold Dieterle's Thai canteen. The Top Chef winner thrilled critics and chowhounds alike when he debuted this project, taking on Southeast Asian cuisine and puritanical notions of authenticity with impressionistic riffs. 469 Sixth Ave between 11th and 12th Sts (212-675-4295)

RedFarm
This West Village eatery from Ed Schoenfeld and dim sum whiz Joe Ng (Chinatown Brasserie) defies Chinese-restaurant stereotypes. Instead of fire-breathing red dragons, the airy spot is done up with wood tables, channeling a New England farmhouse. The menu is equally refreshing. Ng plugs seasonal produce into Far East--influenced bites such as soy-glazed filet mignon in teeny pastry cups. 529 Hudson St between Charles and W 10th Sts (212-792-9700)

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