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The best new restaurants in NYC

From white-clothed fine dining to hole-in-the-wall cheap eats, find the best new places to eat and drink in NYC

Photograph: Paul Wagtouiz

Looking for the best new restaurants in NYC? As much as we love our long-time establishments and neighborhood standbys for a New York pizza slice, New Yorkers are a fast-moving bunch fixated on what's new and happening around them. Luckily, the city's food-and-drink scene provides ample activity to satiate short attention spans. From fine-dining Midtown restaurants to cheap eats joints in Brooklyn, ready your bellies for the hottest and best new restaurants NYC has to offer.

RECOMMENDED: Find the best restaurants in NYC

Best new restaurants in NYC

Amada

In the 10 years since his tapas temple Amada opened in Philadelphia, Jose Garces has become a food-world emperor, with 15 restaurants, a James Beard Award and an Iron Chef title under his belt. The megachef now brings that empire to New York with this Brookfield Place outpost of his tapas-focused flagship, a 248-seat, Andalusian-inspired dining room fitted with rattan-backed banquettes, geometric tile work and woven screens. Garces is collaborating in the kitchen with Gilt vet Justin Bogle—the youngest chef ever awarded two Michelin stars—on small plates like clams with chorizo and almonds, a flatbread topped with Catalan sausage and piquillo pepper confit, and empanadas stuffed with Manchego and served with artichoke escabeche. The companion wine program, curated by Nacho Monclus (Socarrat, Lupulo), exclusively features Spain-bred bottles, while cocktails take inspiration from acclaimed Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar’s films: the Bad Education features apricot-infused brandy, Spanish grappa and chamomile cordial.

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Emmy Squared

With their popular Clinton Hill, Brooklyn canteen Emily, husband-and-wife team Matt and Emily Hyland created the rare restaurant where you can get both some of New York’s best new-school pizza and one of its finest burgers. For the couple’s latest za destination, a square-pie spin-off in Williamsburg, they’re trading Gotham’s thin-crust rounds for thick, Detroit-style pan pizza and cheeseburgers for saucy Italian-American subs. Teaming up with chef-partner Lou Tomczak (Paulie Gee’s), the Hylands pan-bake both red and white pies, such as a burrata-crowned Margherita, a marinara-sauced house special topped with banana peppers and ranch, and a blanca Angel Pie with sottocenere, mushrooms and a truffled egg yolk. Sandwiches include options like a chicken parmigiana hero, while sides and snacks—including crispy cheese curds, waffle fries and a bottarga-shot bok choy Caesar salad—round out the menu.

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Williamsburg

Rider

After a three-year sojourn in his native St. Louis, where he helmed sleek basement pub Basso, James Beard Award–winning chef Patrick Connolly (Bobo) makes his New York return with this 64-seat bi-level restaurant, set inside Williamsburg’s nonprofit music venue National Sawdust. And although it’s named after tour riders, the often ridiculous dressing-room requests of musicians, you won’t find color-coordinated M&Ms or Rihanna-approved Hot Cheetos on Connolly’s menu—instead, expect vegetable-forward plates such as ricotta toast with grilled mortadella and shaved raw beets with blue cheese and quinoa. Meatier offerings include confited chicken wings with caramelized fennel, and roasted beef served on a bagna-cauda–lavished baguette with roasted marrow. Diners can enjoy their meals in the upstairs dining room, decorated with padded leather booths and dark-wood seating, or downstairs at a bar trimmed with beechwood benches and stainless-steel stools. Behind the marble bar, general manager Colby Zito (Maialino) crafts cocktails like a brandy-rum Bernie Sanders Rookie Card (vanilla, grenadine) and a mescal-based Free Brain Surgery (lime, fernet).

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Momosan Ramen & Sake

it’s hard to believe that a megawatt Japanese chef such as Morimoto namesake Masaharu Morimoto wouldn’t have forayed sooner into the lucrative world of ramen, having spent a decade erecting an international empire of modern Japanese restaurants and sushi bars spanning New York to New Delhi. But the bespectacled Iron Chef alum makes his splashy debut to the noodle-soup game with this 60-seat Murray Hill restaurant, which affectionately takes its title from the toque’s nickname in the kitchen. On the menu are the titular bowls, offered both in traditional varieties, such as tonkotsu (with soy tare, pork chashu and ajitama egg), and globally inspired broths, such as a spicy, Malaysian-inflected laksa version with coconut curry and red miso ground pork. Beyond ramen, small plates range from a romaine-cucumber chashu salad in garlic sauce to a Peking duck taco with hoisin and apricot-chili sauce in a soft tortilla. On the drinks front, a sake menu touts 13 regional varieties offered by the glass in traditional cedarwood masu boxes, along with a selection of sake-based cocktails.

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Murray Hill

Freek's Mill

Named after an 18th-century water mill once situated on the Gowanus Canal, this locally driven American eatery from Casa Mono and Bar Jamón alums J.T. Stewart and Maxime Giordani pays homage to the neighborhood’s long history of farming both in title and in principle. The vegetable-forward menu, overseen by chef Chad Shaner (Union Square Cafe, Gotham Bar & Grill), nods to the canal’s long-gone oyster beds with a plate of wood-roasted bivalves and pickled scapes, while fish and wild game appear in small plates like striped-bass crudo with sea beans and a “rabbit in a jar” with beet mostarda. Rotating greens adhere to seasonal availability, with an opening spring lineup sporting dishes like dandelions with fried chicken liver and egg, and BBQ kohlrabi with grits. On the vino front, Hotel Delmano beverage pro Alex Alan curates a wine list of 120 bottles and 16 by-the-glass options centered heavily on cru beaujolais and Loire chenin blanc.

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Gowanus
See the full list of the best new restaurants in April

Best new restaurants and bars by month

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