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Bao Ong

Bao Ong

Bao Ong is Time Out's former New York Food & Drink Editor.

Articles (67)

The 6 best restaurants in Providence

The 6 best restaurants in Providence

There is never a bad time to eat excellent food, and hungry visitors will find plenty of it at the best restaurants in Providence. The last couple of years haven’t been kind to eateries here in New England, with closures becoming far too regular, but the restaurant scene in Rhode Island remains as vibrant as it is delicious. Providence is best known for its intellectuals and creative community, but culinary innovation is alive and well here. Highly respected culinary school Johnson & Wales makes sure of that, making for a city full of talented young chefs and plenty of opportunities to cook. Providence is a brilliant city, and it shines brightest on the plate.

NYC's 36 best vegetarian and vegan restaurants

NYC's 36 best vegetarian and vegan restaurants

It has never been easier to find enticing plant-based dishes in NYC. Our vegan and vegetarian options go beyond veggie burgers, although NYC has plenty of those, too—and extends to special occasion destinations, exciting new spots and some of the best overall restaurants in the city. Sure, restaurants all over the ingredient spectrum have broadened their nutrient horizons over the years, but these are your best bets for a meat-free guarantee. RECOMMENDED: See more of the best restaurants in NYC

The 18 most romantic restaurants in NYC

The 18 most romantic restaurants in NYC

Some nights you just want to grab a bite at a great restaurant or down a quick drink at a bar. But other nights—like when you’re celebrating a special occasion, planning to pop the question, or just trying to apologize for that thing you did—you need to go all out. While a casual pizza date can be every bit as romantic (remember where you shared your first pepperoni pie?), we’re here to guide you to the very best spots for wining, dining and wooing. These are the most romantic restaurants in NYC... now go get ‘em, Tiger! RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The 25 best cheap eats in NYC

The 25 best cheap eats in NYC

“Cheap” has a unique meaning in NYC. There are people in other parts of the country (or at least on the internet) who will try to tell you that they can get a whole house, college education or town hall bribe for $10 where they’re from. This is, of course, untrue, but the five boroughs are certainly more expensive than most places. That’s why satisfying “cheap eats” for $10 and under are noteworthy in New York. In a city where it costs $5.50 just to get to work and back by subway, finding something to fill you up for a little less than twice that much can be a cheerless relief. If said item is also actually tasty, it reintroduces some levity back into the occasion. So the next time you’re choosing between a four-bedroom in Anytown, USA or excellent slices, chopped cheese, fried chicken sandwiches, falafel or tacos, have a look below and know that you made the right choice.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The best hotels in Midtown, NYC

The best hotels in Midtown, NYC

There are few neighborhoods in New York better for sightseeing than Midtown, Manhattan. In the heart of the concrete jungle, you’re within walking distance of the Empire State Building, Grand Central Station, Broadway, big-time shopping and Michelin-starred restaurants. It’s a great spot from which to base a weekend full of NYC’s most iconic sights.   What’s more, often Midtown’s hotels are attractions in themselves. From big name luxury like Ritz-Carlton and Hyatt to little boutique wonders, the hotels in Midtown can hold enough secrets and activities for you to never even need to do sightseeing at all. But of course you will. You’re in New York, after all – it’s probably why you came in the first place.     RECOMMENDED: The best hotels in NYC This article includes affiliate links. These links have no influence on our editorial content. For more information, click here.

The 27 best outdoor bars in NYC

The 27 best outdoor bars in NYC

In New York City, outdoor drinks are possible, probable and practically perfected year-round, but spring and summer are prime time for open air imbibing. The sunny days are longer, the temperatures are warmer and fun frozen drinks reenter the mix all around town. With appearances by boat bars, rooftops, dives and secret gardens, these are our favorite places to sip beer, wine, cocktails and all manner of boozy consumables outside in NYC this season.  RECOMMENDED: More of the best bars in NYC

The 9 best bars in Soho

The 9 best bars in Soho

NYC’s Soho (not to be confused with London’s!) has floated from its artistic reputation and crystallized into a shopping district over the years, but even when they pave paradise, people still gotta eat and drink. And, in spite of its present bourgeois trappings, there are still plenty of genuine places to do it.     RECOMMENDED: See the full list of best bars in New York

The 12 best options for grocery delivery in NYC

The 12 best options for grocery delivery in NYC

Let’s face it: even though there are enough amazing restaurants in New York to keep you busy all year, you can’t eat out every night. Ditto takeout and delivery. You have to be a grownup and cook for yourself every once in a while. If the thought of going to the grocery puts you on edge though, you’re in luck. We’ve rounded up the best options for grocery delivery in NYC so you can get your supplies without having to deal with the stress of actually going to the store. It’s time to get cooking, and these grocery delivery services can help. As a reward for all your future cooking, we’ve got you covered for the best wine delivery and best cheese delivery services in the city too. Cheers!

The 16 best steakhouses in NYC

The 16 best steakhouses in NYC

Few dining daydreams capture New York City’s culinary appeal as keenly as the notion of slicing into an expertly prepared steak. Whether its butter-basted, arranged amid an abundance of classic sides, grilled right at the table or served with martinis or red wine, it’s a pulse-quickening meal fit for fantasies.  Fortunately, the five boroughs have an abundance of carnivore emporiums, including excellent BBQ, burger and steak restaurants. So sharpen your knives, ready your jaw and dig into the best steakhouses in NYC.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC  

The 15 best sushi restaurants in NYC

The 15 best sushi restaurants in NYC

New York City has all manner of marvelous Japanese food options, including tip-top ramen spots, excellent izakayas, and a fabulous food courts. We also have an abundance of sushi options, and narrowing them down can be a happy challenge. Here, we’ve collected our favorite special occasion destinations and more casual spots, all amounting to the best sushi NYC has to offer.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The 26 best restaurants in Queens

The 26 best restaurants in Queens

There are many wonderful things to do in Queens, and one of them is eat. But after long days at the Queens Museum, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Rockaway Beach, or simply the subway ride home, the last thing you want to do is have to choose a restaurant or bar. So we’ve assembled this list of the best restaurants in the borough, including old classics, neighborhood favorites, and newer spots.  RECOMMENDED: The best restaurants in NYC

The 13 best dim sum spots in NYC

The 13 best dim sum spots in NYC

On a Sunday morning, duck from a Chinatown street into a bustling dim sum parlor, where carts clatter over the din of conversations in many languages. Steamer baskets reveal glistening dumplings and tender pork buns; the meal spills into the afternoon as the food just keeps on rolling from the kitchen. The New York City dim sum scene offers some of the best ways to spend an afternoon with friends, including the world’s most inexpensive Michelin-starred restaurant. While the pandemic shuttered a few of NYC’s favorite dim sum spots, we’re lucky enough to get to spend Sunday afternoons slurping down har gow again. While Manhattan’s Chinese restaurants might be your first thought for dim sum, don’t sleep on Flushing or Sunset Park’s Chinatowns. Many spots order takeout and delivery, if that’s your thing, but we believe that dim sum is one of the few things worth putting on pants for. RECOMMENDED: Find more of the best restaurants in NYC

Listings and reviews (102)

Chote Miya

Chote Miya

There’s never been a better time for Indian food in NYC. Talented chefs like Chote Miya’s Satinder Vij have helped shed the cuisine’s cheap-and-good image by revamping classics like curries and samosas that still pay homage to the array of textures and flavors we have come to love. The menu, inspired by Bombay’s most popular street-side eateries, is full of recipes that Indian-food purists and fans of modern Indian restaurants (such as sister restaurant Gupshup) can get behind. Chote Miya, which means “a regular, approachable guy” in Hindi, offers the type of casual food New Yorkers love at all times of the day. MENU: From the Street: $8 Bombay Bhel / Samosa Chaat / Bun Samosa / Honey Chili Cauliflower / Keema Pav (+6) Bombay Frankies: $14 Chicken Khurchan / Paneer Khurchan / Beef Pepper Fry (+2) Curries (Option of Rice or Paratha): $15 Chana Masala / Delhi Butter Chicken (+2) Sides: $5 Samosa / Magic Masala Fries / Paratha Lassi: $4 Mango Lassi / Masala Chai / Pumpkin Spice Lassi Dessert: $5 Gulab Jamun

Ernesto's

Ernesto's

3 out of 5 stars

Ryan Bartlow spent two years cooking in San Sebastián, a Basque Country seaside town known as much for its high concentration of Michelin-rated restaurants as its casual pinxto bars. In his first solo restaurant, the 38-year-old chef leans more toward the relaxed, convivial atmosphere of the latter (thankfully).Since Ernesto’s opened, one of the most popular dishes has been the paleta Iberico con chips ($22), a fairly common dish in Spain that we don’t often see in New York. A mountain of thinly cut potato chips is draped with ribbons of imported jamón. While the chips tasted too salty on their own, they were perfect when combined with a bite of ham and a shared glass (or two) of wine.The menu’s Para Picar (“To Nibble”) section has other shareable plates (all $10). You’ll find classic recipes like the nuestra tortilla and always popular gildas con atún, which has skewers of anchovies, peppers and olives with slices of canned tuna belly on the side. Featuring a bar that stretches nearly the length of the 55-seat room, the restaurant has the same festive energy found in Donostia, as San Sebastián is called in Basque.On our two visits, the service was friendly and laid-back. A knowledgeable bartender guided us through the well-edited wine list, which includes some esoteric bottles, and a hostess enthusiastically recommended the next-door wine bar, which is a café during the day.  However, we waited a long time to place our drink orders, and a quoted 20-minute wait was nearly an

Bar Bête

Bar Bête

5 out of 5 stars

A French-style omelette may appear to be a simple recipe, but, for many chefs, it’s a gauge of a cook’s technical skills. In the case of Bar Bête, Marc St. Jacques should lead a master class: His rolled omelette ($15) is a silky, perfectly pale-yellow blanket of eggs that cradles a generous amount of peekytoe crab with finely chopped chives, all topped with seaweed butter.This dish alone convinced us that we could be regulars at this Brooklyn spot, which draws inspiration from the trendy neighborhood bistros dotting cities like Paris, Montreal and New Orleans. When these restaurants are done right, they feel like updated classics offering well-executed plates in a casual environment that peels back any pretense. Recently, we stepped into the narrow, 50-seat room. There was a buzzy energy, but you could still have a conversation above the din. There’s a glow throughout the understated space that matches the food itself: classic but with unexpected twists that keep surprising you, no matter how many times you’ve tasted these flavors before. Take the chickpea crêpe ($9), for example, which reminded us of  two favorites: socca, the crispy snack commonly found in the South of France, and a comforting grilled-cheese sandwich—here, the crêpe’s triangles of dough oozed with buttery cow cheese and spicy Swiss chard. The mushroom brioche ($7) glistens as the sherry butter melts on top; if you order this with the crêpe, it’s like nirvana for a carb lover.As a Frenchman next to us tucked

Paisley

Paisley

Unlike many Indian restaurants in town focused on one region, chef Peter Beck (formerly of Tamarind) explores the subcontinent’s diverse culinary offerings. The result is a menu showcasing flavor-packed dishes, including Konkan fish curry and a lamb soup known as Kashmiri yakhni.

Da Toscano

Da Toscano

Michael Toscano was Perla’s head chef before decamping, in 2015, to Charleston, South Carolina. But now he’s back in the same space with his own restaurant, Da Toscano, where he showcases Italian cuisine with plates like veal-head parmigiana and oysters roasted in crab fat.

Torien

Torien

It’s nearly impossible to secure a reservation at Torishiki, Yoshiteru Ikegawa’s 16-seat restaurant in Tokyo. But New Yorkers can now get a taste of the famed yakitori menu at Torien. Here, the omakase experience is focused on using every part of the chicken—cooked on charcoal grills and served on skewers, of course.

The Well Kitchen & Table

The Well Kitchen & Table

If you’re still going strong with your 2020 resolution to eat more healthfully, The Well Kitchen & Table is the type of restaurant to help you stay on track. Open from breakfast to dinner, the sleek space looks like it could serve as a test kitchen for Goop. Here, Executive Chef Sherry Cardoso’s vegetable-forward menu is full of seasonal and organic ingredients. A maki bowl of hamachi or coconut cauliflower fried rice makes it easy to keep those wellness goals for the new year.

Quality Bistro

Quality Bistro

New York is full of French-style bistros, but this restaurant from the hospitality group Quality Branded is putting a modern spin on the classic menu with items like crabcake paillard, Moroccan fried chicken and hasselback butternut squash.

Portale

Portale

4 out of 5 stars

“I WAS OBSESSED with the seafood salad,” says a regal woman seated at the sleek bar in her LBD and pearl earrings. “Can you guys make that for me?”  She is referring to a dish that chef Alfred Portale made iconic at the celebrated Gotham Bar & Grill, where he ran the kitchen for more than 30 years. But you won’t find said dish—or the other meticulously stacked plates he made popular—at his first solo endeavor, Portale, where he is hoping to find a new audience. Instead, to familiarize yourself with the nearly three-month-old restaurant, consider the generous serving of fritto misto ($21) teeming with calamari, cod and shrimp, all lightly battered in rice flour.  This fried appetizer exemplifies Portale’s more casual approach to fine dining. While the 7,000-square-foot eatery spans two floors, the intimate downstairs comprises a front room (which includes a 14-seat bar) separated from a main dining room that, with its white oak, brass accents and Calacatta marble, feels like an extension of the nearby West Elm. You won’t find white tablecloths here, but many of the chef’s longtime fans will no doubt be drawn to familiar luxuries like the delicate foie gras tortellini in brodo ($21).  But it’s the half-dozen pastas, each handmade from locally farmed grains milled in the open kitchen, that best showcase the new Portale—both the chef and the restaurant. The bowl of lumache ($28) is faultless: The elbow-shaped dough is covered in a rich white bolognese that’s studded with flecks o

Mothership Meat Company

Mothership Meat Company

3 out of 5 stars

No matter the style of barbecue, the meat always garners the accolades. The sides get the Susan Lucci treatment: They’re consistently a part of the conversation and sometimes raved about, but, more often than not, it’s a case of “always the bridesmaid, never the bride.” At Mothership Meat Company, the supporting cast of dishes (each $4–$7) takes center stage.Consider the peppery pork and beans, which could easily be a satisfying entrée on its own. The fluffy cornbread is not too sweet (like too many versions we’ve wasted calories on). Our order of mac and cheese, each noodle swaddled in melted cheddar, tasted as if it had been lovingly baked all day.Perhaps this shouldn’t be a surprise in a whimsical space where graffiti art of aliens and spaceships, instead of the usual taxidermy and cowboy boots, adorns the walls. As it turns out, pitmaster (and co-owner) Josh Bowen has always been a bit of a nonconformist. When he opened the nearby John Brown Smokehouse in 2011, the menu boasted Kansas City–style smoked meats in a borough known more for bibimbap than beef short ribs.Here, the barbecue inspiration turns to Texas. The meat is ordered by the pound: We’d go back for the short-rib pastrami ($30/pound), with its balanced salty and smoky flavors. The fatty brisket ($26) is superior to the somewhat dry lean brisket ($23). If you order the prime rib ($30), be sure to ask for some rarer slices. We savored the beef-and-pork sausage links ($8), a juicy German-style bratwurst. As we du

Bemelmans Bar

Bemelmans Bar

From the iconic Madeline murals by Ludwig Bemelmans to the live music, Bemelmans is like no other experience. Somehow, the white-jacketed service doesn't feel stuffy but transportive to another era that isn't just another Prohibition-style bar knockoff. Maybe it's the fact that the classics are done just right (head bartender Luis Serrano has worked here for 31 years).

Orchard Townhouse

Orchard Townhouse

The Orchard Townhouse is a brasserie-style restaurant anchoring a four-story townhouse from the team behind the Fat Radish. Guests can order standards like steaks, burgers and chicken Milanese to enjoy in the stylish space filled with Thonet chairs, comfy banquettes and a marble-top bar. The team plans to rent out four apartments spanning the top two floors later this year.

News (225)

This Google doc shows all NYC restaurants and bars with heaters

This Google doc shows all NYC restaurants and bars with heaters

With outdoor dining a permanent fixture across the five boroughs these days, one of the most common questions New Yorkers have found themselves asking is: Where can I eat or drink outside without freezing my ass off? Restaurants with heaters? Bars with heaters? For you dear reader, we’ve started a Google doc with more than 100 restaurants and bars with outdoor dining setups that will keep you warm. Find the running list here—or check it out below—which we’ll be updating regularly. It’s like the chain letter we all need this year (email us at food.ny@timeout.com for all the spots we’ve still yet to add.) The list is divided by boroughs and each restaurant or bar is hyperlinked where possible so you can find out more because like everything else in 2020, things are constantly changing. But once you’ve found a spot to hang out (don’t be surprised if the restaurant throws in a blanket or foot warmers), enjoy yourself—and remember to wear a mask when you’re not eating or drinking and of course, tip well. Looking for more options? Here’s everything you need to know about outdoor dining in NYC. Most popular on Time Out - The most haunted places in NYC- The 101 best sex scenes of all time- A former Eleven Madison Park chef opens an underground fried chicken restaurant- Here’s how to track your mail-in ballot this year in NYC- The best Halloween events in NYC for 2020 Want to know what’s cool in the city before your friends do? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest and greatest

Local farms are delivering fresh produce to New Yorkers' doorsteps

Local farms are delivering fresh produce to New Yorkers' doorsteps

Farm-to-table dining is considered de rigueur whether you’re eating in a quaint restaurant on Bleecker Street in the Village or the hottest restaurant in Bushwick. But with all New York restaurants forced to turn to delivery and takeout—if they’re even open—farmers and other distributors have stepped up to help those of us cooking more these days. Consider it farm-to-apartment. From milk and mackerel to eggs and escarole, farmers are shipping their best products to our homes these days. Many of these farms are hurting financially with restaurants no longer placing orders. But in a time of social distancing, even hitting up the grocery store can feel risky at times. While our city’s farmers markets are still open, not everyone has easy access to them (though it’s worth noting that GrowNYC—which oversees the city’s farmers market, such as the one in Union Square—has put together an online database, where you can find vendors that are offering delivery). As Lee Jones, the farmer behind The Chef’s Garden, shares with Time Out New York: “I feel so urgent to convey that we have been a part of the NYC food scene for awhile. Yet, now, none of that means anything, and we are just trying somehow, some way, to keep things afloat like everyone. We have product ready, people need healthy food and as long as we can keep going, we’re going to keep sending veggies to families.” Below are some sources to take advantage of the bounty in the comforts of your own home. Brooklyn Grange Photograp

Time Out Market New York’s new fall cocktails

Time Out Market New York’s new fall cocktails

There are only a few weeks left of fall and winter is around the corner, but it doesn’t mean we have to say goodbye to call those fun, tropical cocktails that kept us hydrated—and sane—during those warmer months of the year. Enter Time Out Market New York’s new fall cocktails (all $14). Thirsty New Yorkers can find plenty of hot cocktails to warm up with these days, but the Time Out Market Bar’s menu includes drinks you wouldn’t think of once the leaves have changed colors and everyone is sipping a PSL. Photograph: Time Out / Noah Fecks The top selling cocktail so far has been the Salty Thyme Margarita, according to Scott Ubert, Time Out Market New York’s general manager. In this ode to warmer climates, the recipe includes tequila, thyme, blood orange juice, lime, Combier d’Orange and sea salt. “What’s fun about the margarita is that it has you reminiscing about summer,” Ubert says. “You feel like summer is back.” Photograph: Time Out / Noah Fecks The new cocktails, a collaboration between Ubert and other Time Out Market employees, include the Pomegranate Punch, Winter Spiced Sangria and Sweet Bourbon Mojito—all of which can be enjoyed with one of the city’s best waterfront views. Guests want cocktails they’re familiar with, so it’s no surprise that the My Kind of Old Fashioned—which includes a splash of McClure’s maple syrup that makes you think of wood-burning fireplaces and winter—is the second most in-demand drink.  All cocktails are currently available to go.  Photo

9 great NYC spots where you can enjoy outdoor dining with live music

9 great NYC spots where you can enjoy outdoor dining with live music

Among the best things to do in NYC this year, live music feels like a distant memory. But in a surprising twist, restaurants have now become the best venues to catch musical acts IRL as outdoor dining is more popular than ever. Across the five boroughs, we’ve seen restaurants and bars create stunning outdoor dining spaces as they do their best to entice New Yorkers to dine out. And with al fresco dining here to stay, the city has helped set the stage for artists, whether street performers or professional musicians seeking gigs that were non-existent at the beginning of the current crisis. “One of the amazing things about New York is the creativity,” says Angie Mar, the owner and executive chef of The Beatrice Inn, where you can often listen to live music at this West Village favorite. “The artistic talent in this city is unparalleled, and it’s been a beautiful reminder of the artistry that abounds during this pandemic.” Canary Club View this post on Instagram A post shared by Canary Club (@canaryclubnyc) on Aug 27, 2020 at 8:30am PDT The convivial atmosphere at the Canary Club is more subdued than the shenanigans you’d find on Bourbon Street. But the live jazz—from 6-8pm Wednesday through Sunday, last we checked—combined with the New Orleans-inspired menu is bound to put anyone in a good mood (if not, try ordering the tequila-based Chili Dream cocktail). Reservations via Resy are recommended. Dante Photograph: The Bailsmen The Bailsmen,

Popeyes introduces new limited menu item: Wicked Shrimp

Popeyes introduces new limited menu item: Wicked Shrimp

Popeyes is bringing on the heat. Apparently, the chain’s instant success with its spicy chicken sandwich has sparked a roll out of additional chili-spiked dishes. The company recently brought back its ghost pepper wings and in the latest reveal, participating restaurants are now selling a limited menu item: Wicked Shrimp. While the popular chain may be best known for its fried chicken, there are plenty of fans that love all the other menu items—especially the seafood (here’s our ranking of all the sleeper hits). The company won’t share the exact recipe, but the bite-sized Wicked Shrimp is marinated in an “authentic blend of herbs and spices,” including cayenne pepper and a few dashes of Sriracha. It’s then battered and fried until each crustacean is ensconced in a crispy coating. If the ghost pepper wings are any indication, however, don’t expect the Scoville scale to break. Each order includes 14 pieces with one regular side, a biscuit and a Smoky Garlic Tartar sauce (it’s $5 at most locations). It’s also available to order through the Popeyes app for delivery if you’re not going to pick up an order in person. Maybe the next pro order at Popeyes is a surf-and-turf combo? Most popular on Time Out - This map highlights the most popular Thanksgiving sides in each state- Awesome Twitter reactions to President-Elect Joe Biden's victory speech- The 15 coolest neighborhoods in the United States- Apparently, a lot of people are currently listening to NSYNC's "Bye Bye Bye" and Miley

A natural wine bar with a hidden dining room is opening in Williamsburg

A natural wine bar with a hidden dining room is opening in Williamsburg

Cressida Greening and her husband, Emir Dupeyron, decided they had to open their new business despite a year that has crippled the restaurant industry. Winona’s, which is named after the couple’s rescue pit bull mix, is set to open on November 12th along Flushing Avenue in Williamsburg—just a zip code away from one of the recent hot spots in Brooklyn that faced partial shutdowns. “We had to take our time and look at our approach, but there was no way we were going to walk away from it,” says Greening, who lives next door and signed the lease last May. “We’re trying to make ourselves as pandemic proof as possible.” Photograph: Brandon Thomas Brown The space functions as a café during the day with breakfast and lunch before flipping to a natural wine bar at night. In December, they plan to open The Back Room at Winona’s, a more formal dining space hidden behind a mirrored door. Greening, who is the executive chef, will serve a prix-fixe menu in the space, which has views of the open kitchen. Before moving to New York about eight years ago, the English-born Greening cooked at The Breslin before launching her own catering business and ran an intimate supper club out of her loft. Dupeyron was the owner of Café Condesa in the West Village and helped open La Milagrosa in Williamsburg. “We want this to be an extension of our home where people feel looked after and welcomed,” Greening says.  Photograph: Brandon Thomas Brown The breakfast menu features dishes like smoked salmon tar

Krispy Kreme has introduced new glazed donuts

Krispy Kreme has introduced new glazed donuts

This week there's sweet news for fans of Krispy Kreme’s Original Glazed Doughnuts: Caramel Glazed and Salted Double Caramel Crunch Doughnuts are the newest glaze flavors to be introduced across the U.S. It’s the first time the chain’s iconic glaze waterfall will flow with sweet, rich caramel. The limited-time offer at participating shops will carry the new doughnuts after past reveals for flavors like blueberry, strawberry, coffee and more recently, the revival of chocolate. Photograph: Krispy Kreme Even if you’re a fan of the classic glaze, the new flavors could win you over. For the icing on the crunch doughnut, there’s a sprinkle of salted crunch topping to bring things over the top. The new treats are expected to be available until November 22nd. “There are a lot of caramel lovers out there and if you’re one of them, this doughnut is going to blow your mind,” says Dave Skena, the brand’s chief marketing officer, in a company statement. “It’s incredibly delicious and you’re going to need to take a moment for yourself and just be one with caramel awesomeness. It’s been a year, to say the least. You’ve earned it.” Most popular on Time Out - Emotional Twitter reactions to Kamala Harris becoming Vice President- This company is willing to pay you $1,000 to binge-watch 10 pretty good movies- The 15 coolest neighborhoods in the United States- Believe it or not, about 50,000 people voted for Kanye West to become President- The best cities to visit in the USA to get to know Amer

A downtown Manhattan supper club brings its burlesque shows outdoors

A downtown Manhattan supper club brings its burlesque shows outdoors

Dinner at Duane Park was never just about the food. On any given night there could be flames bursting on stage, scantily-clad dancers prancing around and contortionists literally bending over backwards for your entertainment.  All of that came to a full stop when the city shut down indoor dining back in mid March (on top of banning live concerts and performances, which are still off limits). But a few weeks ago, this popular supper club on the Bowery known for its burlesque shows found a way to come back: bring the entertainment outside and schedule them at random times. Duane Park now has 20 seats on its sidewalks as part of Paradise Alley, which takes place Thursdays-Saturdays with a three-course prix-fixe menu ($70 on Thursdays and $80 the other two nights). The reservations-only experience lasts 90 minutes with seatings at 6 and 8:30pm. and any performances are “incidental” to keep things legal (ticketed events are currently prohibited). “A little number here, a little number there. It comes and goes,” says David Conrad, Duane Park’s manager. “It won’t cover all our rent, but it’s about getting people back to work in the safest way possible. This felt like the best marriage in how we do it.” The supper club, which has been open for 12 years, has never offered outdoor seating, but today, as guests dig into their shrimp and grits or duck empanadas, they could be joined by jugglers, fire dancers and even an aerialist floating above their tables. Photograph: Daniel D'Ottavio

Two of NYC’s best bars are swapping places next week

Two of NYC’s best bars are swapping places next week

On New Year’s Eve in December 2006, Death & Co opened and quickly became one of the top craft cocktail bars in New York City. The flagship location in the East Village—an intimate, moodily-lit space—has now expanded with locations in Los Angeles and Denver. The bar, which also opened a pop-up on the North Fork of Long Island this year, regularly tops the city’s list of best bars. Almost exactly two years later, 67 Orange Street opened in Harlem and brought serious cocktails to a neighborhood better known for its ties to historic jazz clubs. But the bar was also different than any of the more well-known boites further downtown: it was Black-owned, a female bartender created innovative drinks for the opening and employees through the years have included people who were formerly incarcerated.  Both bars have been open for more than a decade—a rarity for New York hospitality—but there’s one stark difference between the two beloved bars: virtually all the accolades have gone to Death & Co.  In a year when the Black Lives Matter movement gained more momentum than ever before, however, the restaurant and bar industry is beginning to respond to issues of racism, equity and other shortcomings in the workplace.  Starting on Monday, the two bars will swap places for two nights to help promote diversity and foster collaboration. Some staff from both bars will be guest bartending and serving to-go cocktails, including a special created for the partnership (part of the proceeds will be don

This NYC bar has been named the second best in the world

This NYC bar has been named the second best in the world

A year after winning the title for the best bar in the world, Dante slipped to second place but it still remains as the top spot to drink in North America, according to the World’s 50 Best Bars’s announcement today. Dante and three other New York bars that made the top 50—three others made the list for the top 100—are currently open (the Nomad Bar is closed for the time being). This year, these popular watering holes faced a new set of rules ever since indoor dining was prohibited between mid March until some restrictions were lifted on September 30th. The city’s bars were able to offer to-go cocktails for the first time, but they also had to serve food in order to sell alcohol. The other New York City bars on the list include: #12 Attaboy #13 Nomad Bar #16 Katana Kitten #38 Employees Only #71 The Dead Rabbit #89 Death & Co #94 Amor y Amargo The awards come at a time when the hospitality industry faces an array of hurdles during the current crisis of 2020: many of the top bars around the world had to close for months, there’s the threat of a second or third wave (some have had to shut down again), strict public health guidelines in many cities have limited the number of guests that can be served and the travel industry has taken a big hit. The counterpart to the World’s to Best Bars, known as the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, cancelled its awards this year and has plans to return in 2021. Photograph: Steve Freihorn Dante, which opened as Caffé Dante in 1915 as a bar and ca

The best Election Day deals in NYC

The best Election Day deals in NYC

The election results on November 3rd are up in the air (remember 2016?). But there’s one thing New Yorkers can count on: Your “I Voted” sticker is a ticket to a number of Election Day deals in NYC at restaurants and bars across the city. If you’re in line waiting to vote, Pizza at the Pools is doing some admirable work feeding citizens and poll workers. If you’re looking to pick up a meal or treats to stress eat your way through the day, here are some of the best Election Day deals NYC has to offer. Another pro tip: Citi Bike and Lyft are offering 50% off one ride with the code "2020VOTE" today. The Goods Mart Photograph: Courtesy of The Goods Mart Get a free La Colombe 8-ounce coffee with a voting sticker today and tomorrow at this curated Soho market. Junior’s Photograph: Courtesy of Junior’s You get a $7 discount off all full-priced cakes sold online through November 3rd. Cupcakes ($4.25) and 6-inch cheesecakes ($18.95) with a “Vote” logo will be sold at the Brooklyn location (386 Flatbush Avenue). The promotion also coincides with the iconic restaurant’s 70th anniversary. James Photograph: Courtesy of James Are you an optimist or a pessimist this election cycle? James, the cozy neighborhood restaurant in Prospect Heights, has you covered either way this November 3rd. They’ve curated two Election Survival Kits: The Optimist ($130) includes a bottle of pét-nat, two plum margaritas and ingredients for pasta with a black walnut pesto (there’s an apple crisp for dessert,

Harlem fast casual favorite FieldTrip is opening two more NYC locations

Harlem fast casual favorite FieldTrip is opening two more NYC locations

Chef JJ Johnson’s fast-casual restaurant FieldTrip was one of the most anticipated openings last year and garnered rave reviews all around (read Time Out New York’s four-star review here). While 2020 has been full of challenges for New York City restaurants, today Johnson announced the opening of two more locations of his concept at Rockefeller Center and in Long Island City. The third location—FieldTrip has a spot at the U.S. Open site in Flushing Meadows—is set to open on November 11th at the new Queens food fall JACX&CO. Later in the month, the Rock Center restaurant is slated to open later in the month on the concourse level. Both spots will offer the same menu as the OG Harlem location with a lineup of globally-inspired rice bowls (pro tip: the crab pockets, which we included as one of the best cheap eats in NYC, are also not to be missed). “I told my wife coming into COVID that we weren’t going to come out the same,” says Johnson. “The goal was to come out in a better place. I’ll take the risk now with the team and hopefully it’ll work out for the best.” Johnson always had plans of expanding the FieldTrip concept and says there have been requests to open other locations across the country since his successful uptown opening. The two newest restaurants are opening in properties managed by Tishman Speyer, one of the city’s largest commercial landlords. “Rockefeller is anyone’s dream. It’s the heart of New York City,” Johnson says. The openings come at a time when many ind

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