0 Love It

Things to do in New York this Friday

It's time to punch out, wind down and start your weekend. Here's our pick of the best places to sate that Friday feeling.

Brooklyn Bowl
1

Damon Wayans

Critics' pick

As with many no-longer-young comics, this member of the Wayans clan now focuses his material on the vagaries of family and parenting, but he’s still essentially the same guy we fell in love with on In Living Color. And if you look closely, you can still make out the fluffy wig, bulbous red nose and loaded sock of Homey D. Clown.

Read more
Carolines on Broadway, Midtown West Until Sunday September 6 2015
2

Electric Zoo Festival

Critics' pick

New York—just like the rest of the world—goes gaga for EDM (electronic dance music) and shows its love at this annual three-day dayglo rave-up on Randall’s Island. In its six year history, the fest has seen headlining DJ sets and live performances from Skrillex, Deadmau5, Avicii, Pete Tong and Moby—yep, the big names.

Read more
Randalls Island Park, Randall's Island Until Sunday September 6 2015
3

Dollypalooza: An Epic Fan Tribute to Dolly Parton

Critics' pick

Dolly Parton is a national treasure, right up there with the Washington Monument and the Golden Gate Bridge (although much better looking and possessing a more pleasant singing voice). This event, presented by nightlife vet Bevin Branlandingham and World Famous *BOB*, is a tribute to the living legend and all the good times and great songs she's shared with us over the years. Performers include DJ Nath Ann Carrera, Merrie Cherry, Sequinette, Lady Quesa'Dilla, West Vargina, Crimson Kitty and the Parton cover band Doll Parts. Come on down, y'all!

Read more
Littlefield, Gowanus Friday September 4 2015
4

Here and Now Labor Day Festival

Bargemusic hosts a Labor Day boat party with a remarkable program including works by Gordon Beeferman, Dalit Warshaw, Morton Subotnick and John Zorn performed by pianists Warshaw, Kathleen Supove, and Ron Stabinsky, violinist Jennifer Choi and percussionist Kevin Shea, among others.

Read more
Bargemusic, Downtown Until Sunday September 6 2015
5

Xylouris White

Critics' pick

If you've caught drummer Jim White with the Dirty Three, Will Oldham, Nina Nastasia or one of his many other collaborations, you know that he's a loose-limbed marvel with an unusually sensitive ear. Don't miss the chance to catch him here in a heady, exotic new context: a well-matched duo with Cretan lute player George Xylouris.

Read more
Union Pool, Williamsburg Friday September 4 2015
6

I love the '90s Show with the Fresh Kids of Bel-Air

Mark it with your Jelly Roll: Friday night is '90s night at Le Poisson Rouge. Local revivalist crew The Fresh Kids of Bel-Air do the best covers of Ace of Base, Third Eye Blind and TLC you've heard since your school assembly talent show. Le Poisson Rouge's basement location is the perfect set up to roll with your homies.

Read more
Le Poisson Rouge, Greenwich Village Until Friday December 18 2015
7

Lola Star's Dreamland Roller Disco

Have you ever wanted to dress up like a character from Xanadu, The Great Gatsby, or the "Thriller" video and then go dance in a park with a lot of other like-minded people? Join the insanity at Lola Star's Dreamland Roller Disco, where you'll need to unleash your inner Rollerblade vixen to keep up with the crowd and the week's theme. A DJ will be blasting ’80s and ’90s jams all night long, making the LeFrak Center at Prospect Park’s Lakeside the coolest roller rink this side of 1978.

Read more
Lakeside at Prospect Park, Prospect Park Until Friday October 9 2015
8

We Are Your Friends

This enormously fun late-summer surprise, which borrows both its title and its pulsating beat from a 2006 dance hit by the electronic duo Justice, is every bit as ridiculous as you might expect (and hope for) from a romantic drama starring Zac Efron as a DJ and directed by the gray-haired camera guy from Catfish: The TV Show (Max Joseph). Essentially cobbled together from all of the excitement that was cut from Mia Hansen-Løve’s far superior Eden (a more sober exploration of club music subculture), We Are Your Friends stars Efron as 23-year-old Cole Carter, whose evolution the film traces from puppy-eyed party promoter to genuine musician. The movie follows a silly, trite yet totally seductive trajectory that finds its beefcake hero becoming the protégé of a burned-out success story named James (Wes Bentley). A tortured alcoholic who’s rich from spinning the same tired jams in clubs from Paris to Ibiza, James has everything Cole wants—including a sultry girlfriend-assistant, Sophie (Emily Ratajkowski)—but nothing he admires. Meanwhile, Cole’s soulful posse of delinquent buddies, each one of them striving to climb out of the San Fernando Valley, are caught up in a house-flipping scheme with a shady real estate developer. “The world is ours,” these kids keep telling themselves, but they’re emblematic of a generation that’s paradoxically stifled by the infinitude of its own potential. We Are Your Friends doesn’t rewrite the tune on movies about sexy young musicians who learn “

Read more
Now Showing
9

Farmers Market Fridays

Get some green ambition and scoop up fresh produce straight from three local farms, including the Queens Botanical Garden’s own urban farm.

Read more
Queens Botanical Garden, Queens Until Friday November 20 2015
10

Friday Night Poetry Slam

Critics' pick

Performing poets make things lively at this weekly spoken-word event. They spit their best verses onstage in hopes of charming the crowd, winning over the judges and coming back to compete another time.

Read more
Nuyorican Poets Cafe, East Village Until Friday December 25 2015
Show more

We Are Your Friends

Since Neighbors, Zac Efron continues to outfox his critics with this knowingly silly (and fun) drama about a rising DJ, crafted in the same mold as Steven Soderbergh’s Magic Mike.

Read more
Now Showing

Mistress America

Effervescent Greta Gerwig and NYC specialist Noah Baumbach (on fire this year with While We’re Young) collaborate on this tart comedy about urban free fall and frenemy frictions.

Read more
Now Showing

The Mend

Sibling dysfunction gets an exhilarating shake-up in John Magary’s NYC-set ultra-indie, starring an intense, totally transformed Josh Lucas, who flips the script.

Read more
Now Showing

The End of the Tour

You won’t see Forgetting Sarah Marshall’s Jason Segel through the same eyes after you witness his dense dramatic turn as late Infinite Jest author David Foster Wallace. 

Read more
Now Showing

Ricki and the Flash

Suffused with heart and a scrappy sense of bar-band durability, Jonathan Demme’s latest, starring Meryl Streep in a defiant turn, serves up family drama at a driving, insistent pace.

Read more
Now Showing

The Diary of a Teenage Girl

Check out funky British newcomer Bel Powley as a free-spirited San Francisco kid making her adventurous way into ’70s-era womanhood in this ambitious female-friendly comedy.

Read more
Now Showing

Shaun the Sheep Movie

Only Aardman Animations—the British creators of Wallace & Gromit and other lovable, moldable claymation characters—could find an irresistible movie to be made about the story of an amnesiac farmer and his flock at loose in the big city. Much of the beauty of this big-hearted, stop-motion caper (a spin-off of an insanely successful BBC kids series) is the entire absence of decipherable language. Instead imagine grunts, mumbles, bleats and screams as Shaun the Sheep tries to engineer a day off from Mossy Bottom Farm but causes his bewildered owner to bang his head and wander off into the unnamed metropolis (which looks a lot like England’s Bristol, where Aardman has its HQ).  Amid the chaos, it’s sometimes hard to work out exactly which sheep is Shaun, but that doesn’t matter when there are great slapstick scenes in a hospital, a hair salon, a fancy restaurant and an ominous animal pound. Maybe an hour would have been enough, yet even the slower patches have charm to burn.

Read more
Now Showing

The Look of Silence

Joshua Oppenheimer surpasses his devastating The Act of Killing with another essential doc about the Indonesian genocide. The follow-up hits even harder as an indictment.

Read more

Amy

The sad, self-destructive story of Amy Winehouse gets a sympathetic airing in Asif Kapadia’s documentary, which is both a cautionary tale and, when the music’s on, a celebratory one.

Read more
Show more

Eating out?

Grab a drink

The 50 best New York bars

Whether you favor craft brews or serious cocktails; a beer-and-shot special or a transporting glass of wine, NYC has a game-changing bar to slake your thirst

Read more

Comments

1 comments
William F
William F

You say kayak on the Hudson on Friday, but it says it's ONLY available on SATURDAYS in August!!!!!!  Please fix!!!!