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Flamenco performance in NYC
Photograph: Courtesy Simone FratiniRocío Molina: Caída del Cielo

The best things to do in NYC this weekend

The best things to do in NYC this weekend include the Flamenco Festival, On Air Fest, the Outsider Art Fair, a satirical solo play about work, and the last weekend to catch the Paley Center's "Genius: MLK/X" exhibit.

Written by
Rossilynne Skena Culgan
Contributors
Christina Izzo
&
Ian Kumamoto
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Looking for the best things to do in NYC this weekend? Whether you’re the group planner searching for more things to do in NYC today or you have no plans yet, here are some ideas to add to your list for this weekend: The Flamenco Festival, On Air Fest, the Outsider Art Fair, a satirical solo play about work, the last weekend to catch the Paley Center's "Genius: MLK/X" exhibit, and free events around town. All you have to do is scroll down to plan your weekend!

RECOMMENDED: Full list of the best things to do in NYC
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Time Out Market New York
  • Things to do
  • DUMBO

Enjoy a relaxing and fun Friday night out at Time Out Market’s fifth-floor rooftop bar, where you can play board games and foosball with friends and drink specialty cocktails like the Cranberry Cooler, and tastings courtesy of Jim Beam. There will also be sports and movies broadcast on the market’s projector screen and a lineup of resident DJs to keep the night buzzing.

It happens each Friday from 6 to 10pm.

Things to do in NYC this weekend

  • Things to do
  • Events & Festivals

The annual Flamenco Festival makes its return to New York City this month with a commemoration of Spanish guitarists. The beloved event will run from March 1 through the 17, bringing a total of 22 performances across 13 different venues all over the city—from the New York City Center to Jazz at Lincoln Center and Town Hall, among others.

For the uninitiated, flamenco is an extremely captivating Spanish style of music that heavily relies on the guitar and is also usually accompanied by a particular type of dancing and singing.

You can look through the roster of shows right here, which includes "Invocation" at New York City Center, a production that features different pieces focusing on various styles of dance, from bolero to stylized and, of course, the purest form of flamenco.

  • Art
  • Art

The author and illustrator who ignited our childhood imaginations with tales of cuddly bunnies, mischievous squirrels and daring ducks is getting a well-deserved spotlight in NYC.

The wholesome and beautiful works of beloved children’s author and land conservationist Beatrix Potter are now on view at The Morgan Library & Museum through June 9.

Beatrix Potter: Drawn to Nature” is the most darling show in the city right now. The exhibition even features a delightful recreation of Potter’s home that you can actually sit and read in. 

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  • Art
  • Fairs

The Outsider Art Fair returns this year for its show concentrating on self-taught art, art brut and outsider art from around the world. Founded in New York in 1993, the show has become an annual can't-miss event. This year's Outsider Art Fair runs from February 29-March 3 at Metropolitan Pavilion with 63 international exhibitors. The artists represent 32 cities spanning eight countries; nine are showing work for the first time.

A few highlights include: A presentation of original gouache paintings for classic American circus posters; a lineup of contemporary artists from the Canadian Arctic; a survey of Balinese painters with works dating back to the 1930s; Indigenous art from Australia; and miniature landscape assemblages by a retired NYC firefighter. The fair will also showcase artworks by the Beat Generation poets, including William Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Diane di Prima, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, and Joanne Kyger.

  • Art
  • Art

The Harlem Renaissance had an indisputable impact on American culture, but chances are that you probably didn’t spend much time learning about it in school. That’s because, even though it shaped global literature, music, and art, Black Americans’ historical contributions have been systematically erased or gone unacknowledged for centuries.

A groundbreaking exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art hopes to be a part of rectifying the erasure and celebrating Black artists and intellectuals.

"The Harlem Renaissance and Transatlantic Modernism" presents 160 works by Black artists from the Harlem Renaissance and delves into many different aspects of the movement, mostly through the lens of paintings and sculpture. You can get your tickets here

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  • Art
  • Art

With their vibrant colors, delicate ruffles, and dramatic shapes, orchids love to show off their looks. This spring, the New York Botanical Garden is giving the divas of the plant world their moment in the spotlight as part of “The Orchid Show: Florals in Fashion.”

Three up-and-coming designers created massive installations inspired by these fashionable flowers. In one, you'll see orchids turned into avant-garde clothing. Another features a regal orchid queen. The final section draws upon AI to create anthropomorphic creatures who don floral outfits. Florals in Fashion is on view through April 21 at NYBG in the Bronx; adult tickets cost $35.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Spring is just around the corner, but there are technically a few more weeks of winter ahead. At this point in the season, you may feel completely exhausted by enduring the cold weather, wearing a parka every time you step outside, and trudging through the city in boots—and we totally get that.

But before the sweltering summer days arrive, why not soak up these last few weeks of coziness? Several hotels and restaurants around the city are embracing the après ski vibes with extremely hygge chalets. So bundle up in that turtleneck and scarf once again to check out these five spots.

 

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

There’s a lot of good to see at this Manhattan subway stop. 

Two years after opening the subterranean bar Nothing Really Matters, hospitality professional Adrien Gallo continues building his subway station empire, opening See No Evil Pizza last week on the concourse level of the downtown-bound 1 train station at 50th Street and Broadway—a space that once housed a Dunkin’. It joins his Tiny Dancer Coffee on the same concourse.

“I basically transformed a subway station that was super neglected to a destination spot in the middle of Times Square,” Gallo tells Time Out New York.  

Find See No Evil Pizza is located on the concourse level of the downtown-bound 1 train station at 50th Street and Broadway. It is open for pop-ins and Resy reservations Monday-Saturday from 5pm-midnight. 

  • Art
  • Art

The graffiti-covered mailboxes, dumpsters and ice boxes that fill New York City’s sidewalks have been a staple of this city’s aesthetic for decades. Now? They’re works of art.

Artist Danny Cortes, a born-and-raised New Yorker from Bushwick, makes the most accurate (and cute!) recreations of these and other NYC objects and scenes. The only difference is that they’re mini models that can fit in the palm of your hand, including a bodega, a newspaper vending machine, a payphone, an intersection light pole, a blue mailbox, the Keith Haring “Crack is Wack” mural, the shuttered Willie’s Burgers and even the iconic Apollo Theater.

They’re a sight to behold. How someone could get the gritty details just right and at such a tiny size is impressive and frankly must be seen to be believed. Some of Cortes’ works are now on view at Gotham, the new recreational cannabis dispensary in the East Village, and at the House of Cannabis, NYC’s weed museum, as part of an exhibit that pays homage to New York’s most iconic hip-hop landmarks put on by Landmark, curated by Kate Storch

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  • Comedy
  • Comedy

After months of anticipation and some delays, it’s actually official this time—Second City, Chicago’s prestigious comedy club that is responsible for incubating talent like Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Steve Carrell, just opened the doors of its New York location.

The new site of Second City, located at 64 N. 9th St. in Williamsburg, is less of a traditional comedy club than it is a sort of small campus for comedy aficionados. The 12,000-square-foot, two-floor complex includes two cabaret-style live theaters, a training center charged with raising the next generation of iconic comedians, and a restaurant bar called The Bentwood.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Things to do
  • Film events
  • Recommended

Watch stories about fierce and fearless women at this four-day marathon honoring female filmmakers, running from February 29 through March 3 at Barnard College in Morningside Heights. 

Film screenings span formats during this year's 14th edition, from the New York premiere of the documentary COPA 71—the fest's opening film, which chronicles the 1971 Women's Soccer World Cup and the pioneering female players who competed in the match—to narrative features like Erica Tremblay’s Fancy Dance, starring Oscar nominee Lily Gladstone, and Molly McGlynn’s Fitting In, a coming-of-age “traumedy” starring Maddie Ziegler. Cinephiles will want to sit in for panels and discussions with filmmakers and thought leaders, on topics as varied as abortion-focused storytelling to amplifying Indigenous women's voices in film.

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  • Comedy

Combining a traditional comedy show with a complete narrative play, this immersive experience changes up its theme with each show, whether it’s satirically poking fun at art galleries or late-night talk shows. For this edition on Sunday, March 3 in Brooklyn, Funderground takes on prosperity-gospel megachurches, complete with musical numbers, filmed sketches, stunt performers, silly sermons and much more.

Along with hosts Matt McDonough and Quinton Carr-Goodwin and music from the house band, The Great Googly Moogly, bear witness to performers like Kyle Gordon, Brittany Carney, Sydney Duncan, Ian Lockwood, Josh Nasser and William Banks from Car World. And trust us, the humor will be heavenly

  • Art
  • Art

"Giants," the Brooklyn Museum's latest exhibition, fits its name in many facets. First of all, the show relies on the art collection of two titans in the music industry, Alicia Keys and Swizz Beatz (Kasseem Dean). Much of the artwork itself is massive, taking over major swaths of the museum. The exhibition features artists who have made and continue to make a significant impact on the art world and contemporary culture.

Finally, and most importantly, the exhibit encourages big conversations that celebrate Blackness, critique society, and imagine a collective future. "Giants: Art from the Dean Collection of Swizz Beatz and Alicia Keys" runs through July 7, 2024. The show features 98 artworks by Black American, African, and African diasporic artists including Gordon Parks, Kehinde Wiley, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Mickalene Thomas, Hassan Hajjaj, Barkley L. Hendricks, Lorna Simpson, and Amy Sherald. 

"The Deans consider all of the artists in the show as giants. They have these very strong relationships with the artists that they collect. It's not about transaction. It's about being stewards and advocates and supporters of these artists," Brooklyn Museum curator Kimberli Gant told Time Out New York.

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  • Movies

The biggest festival in the country for kids' movies and animated features includes new screenings, short film programs, information sessions with the creators, workshops and other special events throughout the celebration. This year's films include Cannes darling Chicken for for Linda, Oscar nominee Robot Dreams, The Concierge, Coco Ferme and many others. Check out the films at various locations throughout the city starting March 2 and every weekend through March 17.

  • Theater

Do any of us actually know what we’re doing at work? This satirical solo play written by comedian Kristina DeGiovanni and directed by Alexandra Scordato takes on that conceit, fresh off critical acclaim from its 2023 Edinburgh Fringe Fest debut.

In this live show, which sells itself as a “Fleabag meets Office Space for the post-Great Resignation era DeGiovanni plays “a pretentious ingénue” who has been hired for an undercover acting role at a dysfunctional New York media company” to liven up the workplace in these post-pandemic times. As the performer weaves a “tale of lies, betrayal, and absurd impersonations of desperate co-workers,” The Temp sinks its teeth into capitalist structures and corporate culture. See it at Caveat on March 3. 

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  • Movies
  • Science fiction

Beyond its breathtaking battles and galactic machinations, all soundtracked by a Hans Zimmer score in which the German composer seems to have set all the knobs turned to "loudest possible," what’s most impressive about this seriously-impressive blockbuster sequel takes place beneath the surface. And it’s not the colossal sandworms.

No, it’s the subtle character shifts that make Dune: Part Two cerebral as well as cacophonous. The plates are always moving in Frank Herbert’s seminal sci-fi novels: today’s heroes are tomorrow’s pile of corpses. Denis Villeneuve, a writer-director who’s been keen to get his teeth into the tough stuff since his early work like Polytechnique (2009) and Incendies (2010), gets all this. And his screenplay, again co-written with Prometheus’s Jon Spaihts, gives us a hero’s journey with real devil in it.

It's now open in theaters worldwide.

  • Movies
  • Horror

If Aardman hired David Cronenberg to reboot ’80s Plasticine scamp Morph, it might look a bit like this creepy collision of body horror and stop-motion craft. It’s a wildly inventive spurt of bug-eyed British gore that pulls the innards out of the creative process. Quite literally, at some points.

Game of Thrones’ Aisling Franciosi was a torrent of female rage in rape revenge thriller The Nightingale. Here, the anguish is channelled inwardly as her stop-motion filmmaker Ella Blake grasps for the inspiration to finish her puppet film, gradually losing her moorings in the process.

The darkness falls in increments here, until Stopmotion lets rip in a Grand Guignol climax with at least one dare-you-keep-watching moment. It’s not the subtlest ending. But it leaves a mark.

It's in theaters now.

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  • Art
  • Art

Mercer Labs, Museum of Art and Technology, a new immersive museum is opening on February 14. It's the brainchild of Roy Nachum, the artist behind Rihanna’s famous 2016 “Anti” album cover, and his business partner Michael Cayre, a real estate developer. 

The 36,000-square-foot space is located at 21 Dey Street, inside the bank building that used to be part of the now-nextdoor Century 21. It's filled with room after room of immersive fun.

The first of 15 experiences, for example, will take you through a giant room equipped with 26-foot-high projectors that blast a series of images all around that will have you feel like you've just taken a swim inside the sorts of motifs that Nachum explores throughout his work. You will quite literally land inside his art pieces.

In another room, which is being branded as one of only three 4D sound studios in the world, guests are asked to wear a blindfold and lay on the floor to properly enjoy the sounds blasting out of the 36 speakers that are embedded under the elevated floor.

  • Things to do
  • Events & Festivals

As Black History Month approaches, NYC's Paley Center for Media is hosting a new exhibit to celebrate two pivotal civil rights leaders: Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. 

The exhibit, titled "Paley Celebrates National Geographic’s Genius: MLK/X – Two Minds, One Movement," will run from February 1 through March 3 at 25 West 52nd Street. The exhibition draws from the National Geographic show about the two figures, the new season of which goes live on February 1. Admission costs $20.

Drawing from the TV show, the exhibit will feature costumes, props, and set pieces from the series, along with craft activities. Head to the big screen in The Paley Museum’s second-floor theater to see films from the Paley Archive celebrating the incredible lives of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X as well as the premiere episode of Genius: MLK/X

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  • Art
  • Art

The Harlem Renaissance changed the trajectory of American culture, and no other artist encapsulates the spirit of that era better than poet Langston Hughes. He wrote unapologetically about Black life at a time when segregation was law and few Black artists were allowed into the American cultural zeitgeist.

Starting on February 1 — which just so happens to be Langston Hughes' birthday — The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is honoring Hughes and his friendship with photographer, filmmaker, and U.S. Foreign Service Officer Griffith J. Davis in its exhibit "The Ways of Langston Hughes." The free exhibit at the Schomburg Center's Latimer Gallery in Harlem will include photographs of Hughes and Davis, who met in Atlanta, as well as more of Hughes' friendships through letters, artwork and other memorabilia.

  • Art
  • Art

When Komal Shah starting collecting art more than a decade ago, she noticed something startling: "The art world does not treat women artists equally" compared to male artists. 

She decided to do something about that by founding the Shah Garg Foundation with her husband, Gaurav Garg. The organization champions artwork by women and seeks to remedy the imbalances facing marginalized artists. Nearly 100 pieces of art from their collection are now on view in a powerful and diverse show called "Making Their Mark: Art by Women in the Shah Garg Collection" in Chelsea (548 West 22nd Street). It's free to visit through March 23, 2024; hours are Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-6pm.

The expansive exhibition fills two stories with stunning works by artists including Firelei Báez, Cecily Brown, Judy Chicago, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Mary Weatherford, Anicka Yi, and many others. The show features paintings, drawings, textile works, sculptures and mixed media pieces by significant artists from the last eight decades. 

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  • Art

New York is a dog-loving town, a truth beautifully displayed in this “Dogs of New York” exhibition, featuring the Bic-pen illustrations of Israeli artist Shani Nizan.

"When you walk the streets of New York City, it's easy to feel lonely sometimes, until a dog passes by and looks at you as if they know you well. I usually initiate a small conversation with them until I remember that there is a person attached behind,” said Nizan per a press release.

The artist then decides to spread joy to the dog owners themselves by gifting them “human-animal” postcards of their pups. That act expanded into this art exhibition, where the creator delves into the dog culture of New York, exploring different breeds and neighborhoods throughout the city. 

See the show at Moshava Art Gallery in the West Village through April 18.

  • Art

Taking over the Asia Society through August 11, 2024, this immersive photography and video exhibition will bring together the works of more than 50 photographers and video artists from China and around the world to visualize the causes and consequences of the climate crisis.

The showwhich will take attendees from deep within coal mines to the melting glaciers of the greater Himalaya—is co-curated by photographer Susan Meiselas and international exhibition designer Jeroen de Vries, and led by Orville Schell, Asia Society Vice President and Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations.

Along with the artworks themselves, the exhibition will feature a series of speaker events, performances, films and more throughout the run of the exhibition. 

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  • Art

One of the most famous photographs in the world—the haunting portrait of young Afghan refugee Sharbat Gula taken amid the Soviet–Afghan War, known simply as Afghan Girl—will be on view at this showcase of iconic American photojournalist Steve McCurry’s works at Cavalier Gallery. Running from February 8 through March 9 at both the gallery’s Chelsea and Greenwich, CT locations, the solo exhibition will showcase more than 30 of McCurry’s stunning, colorful photographs from the 1980s to today, created in locales from all across the globe, from Cuba to Tibet, Ethiopia to Pakistan. 

The exhibition celebrates the release of McCurry’s latest book, Devotion: Love and Spirituality. The artist himself—who was inducted into the International Photography Hall of Fame back in 2019—will be present at the Chelsea gallery for a reception and book signing on Thursday, February 22, from 6pm to 8pm.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

Nicholas Sparks's bestselling 1996 novel, which inspired a popular 2004 movie, is now also the source of an original musical by indie singer-songwriter Ingrid Michaelson and playwright Bekah Brunstetter. The show charts a romance that begins in the 1940s, and the central is played—in different chapters of their story—by Maryann Plunkett, Dorian Harewood, Joy Woods, Ryan Vasquez, Jordan Tyson and John Cardoza; the supporting cast includes Andréa Burns.

The production, directed by Michael Greif and Schele Williams, arrives on Broadway after a well-received 2022 run at Chicago Shakespeare Theater.

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  • LGBTQ+

Fans of RuPaul's Drag Race rejoice. Arlo Williamsburg is hosting 1,200+ person watch parties every Friday night from 7-10pm so you can experience this season the way it was meant to be experienced — around hundreds of screaming Drag Race fans.

Hosted by Drag Race alum Mirage, consider this your weekend pregame or it can be the main event, too — there will be cocktails, giant screens and drag queens with things to say.

  • Art

Enter into a glittering world of all things green and glitzy at the American Museum of Natural History’s Garden of Green: Exquisite Jewelry from the Collection of Van Cleef & Arpels, which has been fittingly extended through St. Patrick’s Day, March 17. The special exhibition includes 44 pieces of green gemstone jewelry, 32 of which are on display for the first time in the U.S.

The pieces are drawn from the collections of the renowned maison of French high jewelry, Van Cleef & Arpels. On view in the Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals are stand-out pieces including the Patricia Emerald, a 632-carat emerald crystal that was discovered in 1920 in Colombia’s Chivor Mine and a jadeite jade incense burner featuring clouds and three mythical creatures.

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  • Art
  • Art

Miranda Priestly once famously said, "Florals? For spring? Groundbreaking." But at Color Factory, florals for spring are actually groundbreaking as the interactive art experience in Soho takes flowery themes to immersive new levels. 

Color Factory's “Colors in Bloom” experience is now open—exactly at the time when we could all mercifully use a break from the gray landscapes and cold nights.

For example, there's the Central Park Confetti Room, complete with larger-than-life pink cherry blossoms inspired by the city's first sign of spring. Tickets start at $38/person for the experience, which runs through mid-May.

 

  • Sports and fitness
  • Sports & Fitness

If you've always dreamed of going to the Super Bowl but haven't found a good way to get there, the Paley Center for Media is now bringing the Super Bowl to the middle of Manhattan. Its latest exhibit, "Beyond the Big Game," includes a hefty collection of 57 team rings, uniforms from past Super Bowls, and Katy Perry's iconic halftime show outfit.

Sure, it's not the actual Super Bowl, but let's be really serious for a second: It's the closest thing many New Yorkers are going to get to experiencing the big game anytime soon.

If you're not the biggest football fan, don't stress — there's also an entire section that celebrates the best Super Bowl commercials, so those who are creatively and artistically inclined can also stay busy.

The exhibit will run Wednesday-Sunday from 12pm-6pm until March 3. Tickets can be bought in advance online and prices range from free for children to $20 for adults.  

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  • Museums

The International Center for Photography (ICP) in the Lower East Side is celebrating five decades of its existence with ICP at 50: From the Collection, an exhibit that will showcase photography from their archives dating back from 1845 till 2019. Notable names at the exhibit include Robert Mapplethorpe, Carrie Mae Weems, and Laurie Simmons. The show's on view through May 6. 

Along with the retrospective, the ICP is also celebrating the opening of David Seidner: Fragments, 1977-99, the first major exhibit highlighting Seidner's prolific fashion photography career before his passing in 1999. 

  • Movies

If you've ever dreamt of eating the food you see in movies and TV shows, then look no further than Fork n' Film, which will soon be diving deep into Louisiana cuisine. Up next, they're featuring "Princess and the Frog," which means they're serving up some of the Cajun specialties featured on the show including Jambalaya, Beignets, Chicken Andouille Gumbo, and King Cake Martinis. They'll be showing the Disney classic every weekend in February and March at the Mastercard Midnight Theatre in Manhattan.

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  • Art

An exuberant celebration of fashion, the "Fashion Forward" exhibit will showcase original paintings, textiles, garments and drawings from icons like Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Balmain, Hubert de Givenchy, Karl Lagerfeld, Alexander McQueen, and many others. Located in the dynamic Crown Heights gallery "B" Dry Goods, this exhibit will run until March 30 on Thursdays-Saturdays from 12pm-6pm, as well as some Sundays. Although the exhibit is free, everything on display will be for sale.

Other highlights of the exhibit include a traveling trunk for Queen Marie Antoinette’s wardrobe and an original Givenchy sketch of the black dress that Audrey Hepburn's wore in "Breakfast at Tiffany's." This is perfect for anyone interested in taking a look behind the scenes of fashion's biggest moments.

  • Comedy

Head to a beloved West Village music shop for a banging musical comedy blowout every Friday night. This variety show mixes music, comedy, and characters with apperances by Stephen Sihelnik (NY Comedy Festival), Natan Badalov (Adult Swim), Alexander Payne (Netflix), and surprise guests.

Fun fact: The event's set in New York's oldest continually-run music and record store, Music Inn World Instruments. It's been in operation since 1958 and has been heavily featured in the first two seasons of "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel."

Show up early, save a seat and BYOB: You're in for a party.

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  • Art

In her first solo museum exhibition, sculptor Auriea Harvey will bring her net-based interactives and augmented reality sculptures to the Museum of the Moving Image from February through June. Titled Auriea Harvey: My Veins Are the Wires, My Body Is Your Keyboard, the showcase will highlight a collection of more than 40 works from Harvey’s nearly four-decade career, including oversized playable projections of her video games, intricate 3D-printed pieces and even early works plucked from her handbound sketchbooks. 

Regina Harsanyi, the Museum’s Associate Curator of Media Arts who organized the exhibition, notes: “Auriea Harvey has persistently reimagined and redefined the creative boundaries of networked technologies for more than three decades. She possesses a remarkable sensitivity to how the digital revolution of the 1990s spawned a societal shift in the way humans connect.”

  • Art

A free exhibit just south of the West Village, "Photos from A Plague in the Shadows" showcases portraits of HIV-positive New Yorkers who lived through the early years of the AIDS epidemic.

New York born artist Kia LaBeija, who is HIV-positive herslef, hopes to highlight the stories of HIV-positive people who are often overlooked, including women, people of color, children, and the incacerated. The exhibit was put together in collaboration with Blindspot, a podcast that delves into the stories of the city's AIDS epidemic, and will live at The Greene Space until March 11. 

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  • Art

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Bronx Documentary Center’s Youth Photography program, also known as the BDC Youth Photo League, come check out "Through Our Eyes: Youth Photography." The exhibition showcases the photographic work of those talented youngsters in the program, which has provided more than 400 middle school and high school students from the South Bronx with free documentary photography and multimedia classes.

Running through March 3, the presentation will spotlight BDC students who are "building intimate portraits of the borough that many call home" through their art. To coincide with the exhibition, the center has published a book of the same name, a compilation of student photos from the past decade.  

  • Things to do
  • Events & Festivals

Two New York City hotels are offering outdoor spa experiences this winter—The William Vale in Brooklyn and The Rockaway Hotel + Spa in Queens, so grab your swimwear and make a reservation. 

At The William Vale, enjoy the views while indulging in some much-needed stress relief. Bask in the heat of a barrel sauna with panoramic skyline views or soak in a cedar hot tub under the stars—or both! The experience makes for a special solo trip or a romantic date night. 

At The Rockaway Hotel, enjoy a resort-style escape not too far from Manhattan. For the winter, the hotel has transformed its patio area into a winter pool house with cedar saunas and cozy decor. Plus, the outdoor pool is open for a refreshing plunge. After your dip, you can slip into a buttery robe and relax with tabletop games.

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  • Art
  • Art

A refreshing new fashion exhibit at The Met hands the mic to pioneering women designers who dress women of all shapes and sizes. The exhibition shows how female designers have reclaimed the body—and are reclaiming the message in fashion.

"Women Dressing Women" showcases 80 garments by 70 makers, from couture gowns by well-known designers like Donna Karan to political garments by Katharine Hamnett to plus-size outfits by Ester Manas. The exhibition, curated by The Costume Institute, is on view at the Upper East Side museum through March 3, 2024, included with museum admission. It highlights rare pieces from the collection, many of which are on view at The Met for the first time. 

The exhibition explores the subject through four sections: anonymity, visibility, agency, and absence/omission. Focusing on the period between the early 1900s and today, the collection offers a snapshot of fashion history and fashion trends. 

  • Museums

The Grolier Club is America's oldest society for bibliophiles, and they're showcasing decades' worth of bookbinding magic at their 60th Street headquarters. Highlights of the exhibit include silver filigreed and jeweled binding from the 1600s, as well as bindings that date back all the way to the 1540s.

The exhibition highlights more than 100 historic and fine bindings, tracing the evolution of decorated bindings and celebrating the works as three-dimensional art objects. The oldest in the collection is pigskin binding with etched brass cornerpieces and central boss, while the newest is a 2019 free-drawn gilded design in a polychrome palette. 

"Judging a Book by Its Cover: Bookbindings from the Collections of The Grolier Club, 1470s-2020" runs through April 13, 2024. It's free to attend, but make sure to book a tour or attend a talk for the full experience.

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  • Theater
  • Theater & Performance

"Hey sister, go sister, soul sister, go sister," there's a spicy new Moulin Rouge pop-up that's definitely worth going to. 

Moulin Rouge! The Musical has taken over the rooftop at M Social Hotel in Times Square with a Broadway karaoke experience this winter. Decked out in red decor and lit with chandeliers, this pop-up promises to heat up the colder days and makes an especially fun night out for Valentine's dates. Find the venue at 51st and Broadway, with the pop-up available through at least February 2024. 

If you need a little liquid courage to belt it out, there’s a themed drink menu, including The Rouge, Baby!, a twist on a rum punch, and The Sparkling Diamond, a take on a French martini.

Be sure to make a reservation to attend. Reservations can be made for an hour and 15 minutes, bookable on OpenTable. Tickets cost $50/person and include one complimentary themed cocktail.

  • Art
  • Art

Inside a venue dating back 100 years into the past, a new art show explores a question of the future: How can human creativity and artificial intelligence coexist?

ARTECHOUSE, located inside an old boiler room at Chelsea Market, is set to debut its latest digital art exhibition, “World of AI·magination,” on December 1; tickets are on sale here starting at $21/person. To create the exhibition, ARTECHOUSE Studio developed original visual elements with generative AI systems. Designers hope to inspire visitors to consider AI as a "creative associate rather than a mere tool for innovation." 

World of AI·magination centers around a 20-minute cinematic experience with six scenes. One scene, called the Library of Magical Portals, features colossal books brimming with dreams and algorithms. Another scene called Symphony of Illusions constantly morphs, while the Infinite Maze immerses visitors into multiple parallels.

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  • Music

On Sunday mornings at 11am in Manhattan, GatherNYC creates the community and spiritual nourishment of a religious service, but the religion here is music. All are welcome at these hour-long performances of classical music by celebrated local artists. Coffee and pastries are available for free.

These upcoming events are held at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) in Columbus Circle. Shows are scheduled through May 2024. Here’s what’s on the calendar:

• March 3: Invoke
• March 17: Borromeo Quartet
• March 31: Juilliard Quartet
• April 14: Maeve Gilchrist (harp)
• April 28: Majel Connery + Felix Fan: Rivers are our Brothers
• May 12: Ocean Music Action: Megan Conley (harp) + friends
• May 26: Kristin Lee (violin) + friends 

  • Art
  • Mixed media

Journey back in time to the Lower East Side at the turn of the century. A new exhibit at The Museum at Eldridge Street introduces the often-overlooked stories of 29 women who lived or worked in the neighborhood. 

The exhibition, titled "28 Remarkable Women...and One Scoundrel" features mixed media portraits by artist Adrienne Ottenberg, which are printed on silk and cotton banners. They're hung throughout the museum's gallery and historic sanctuary. Stories about the women highlight the work, life, and impact they made culturally, on social justice movements, and more.

Those featured in the exhibition include:

  • Political activist Frances Perkins, who upon witnessing the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, took on an influential role in the worker's rights advocacy movement. That led her to eventually become President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Secretary of Labor—the first-ever woman cabinet member.
  • Suffragist and activist Mabel Ping-Hua Lee who campaigned for women’s rights to vote and was the first Chinese woman in the U.S. to earn her doctorate.
  • Public healthcare worker Elizabeth Tyler, who was the first Black nurse hired at Henry Street Settlement. She went on later to establish the Stillman House Settlement on Manhattan's West Side, which provided health care and social services to the Black community in San Juan Hill.

See the show at the Lower East Side venue through May 5, 2024. The museum is open Sunday through Friday from 10am to 5pm. Admission is $15/adult; pay-what-you-wish admission is offered on Monday and Fridays. Reserve in advance here.

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  • Sports and fitness
  • Sports & Fitness

After two years of outdoor play, Carreau Club, the nation’s first pétanque bar has expanded with an indoor location with more space to get your game on while sipping a drink.

The new indoor venue is now open at Brooklyn's Industry City. For the uninitiated, pétanque (pronounced puh-TONK) is a bocce-ball style French boules sport gaining popularity in the U.S., starting here in NYC.

Carreau Club operates primarily as a walk-in pétanque club and reservations are not required. But you can book a court in advance for a single party or multiple courts for larger groups. Reservations cost $50/court/hour.

Plus, every Friday, there's a free petanque tournament for all levels called the Mix and Match Tournament. Just show up before sign-ups at 7 and bring your A-game. The winner gets a free T-shirt. 

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Season after season, Magic Hour Rooftop Bar & Lounge sprinkles its special blend of hospitality pixie dust to transform its venue into an immersive spectacle. This winter is no different as the Garment District bar presents the saccharine Pink Winter Lodge: Neon Frost Edition.

Expect pink decor everywhere, plus a themed menu with pink drinks and pink sweet treats. Make a reservation here; walk-ins are welcome as well. 

No matter the weather—yes, even if snow is in the forecast—Magic Hour makes for a fun destination, as it offers an indoor and outdoor rooftop with a retractable roof.

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  • Art
  • Art

As she donned the black robe for her role on the Supreme Court, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was known to adorn the traditional garment with a wide array of collars and necklaces. 

Now, her fashion is getting the spotlight in a new photography exhibit called "RBG Collars: Photographs by Elinor Carucci." See it at The Jewish Museum on the Upper East Side from December 15, 2023, through May 27, 2024. 

The installation features two dozen photographs of the late justice’s collars and necklaces taken shortly after Ginsburg died in 2020. This is the first time the Carucci’s photographs are being shown at the Jewish Museum since the images were acquired in 2021.

  • Art
  • Public art

A pastel-hued floral mural with a feminist message is the newest addition to the High Line. Titled “Thank You Darling,” this mural by Dutch artist Lily van der Stokker celebrates the playful, feminine realm often overlooked or derided in our culture. 

"Van der Stokker’s work, which she has referred to as 'feminist conceptual pop art,' is undeniably joyful and positive. However, it often simultaneously speaks to weighty themes—aging, health, and, more generally, the lived experience of being a woman within patriarchal structures," a press release from High Line Art explains.

Her installation for the High Line continues this practice for a wide public audience, offering a sweet expression of gratitude to the millions of passersby and inhabitants of nearby buildings. Find the words THANK YOU DARLiNG (with that capitalization) on the side of a building adjacent to the High Line at 22nd Street.

With the word "darling" styled in bright yellow bubble letters, the mural seems to reach out to personally thank every single person who sees it. Check it out through November 2024.

"What a pleasure to lift Lily van der Stokker's cheerful message to the New York City skyline," said Cecilia Alemani, the Donald R. Mullen Director and Chief Curator of High Line Art. "We hope her work brings visitors and New Yorkers alike a feeling of joy and appreciation."

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  • Things to do

Every year, The Rink at Rockefeller Center ushers in the holiday season by opening up to the public to skate under a golden Prometheus. Once peak season hits, there’s going to be a bit of a wait to get on the slick stuff. 

The Rink at Rockefeller Center is now open; tickets are on sale now.

The Rink was originally designed as a temporary attraction in 1936 to draw visitors to Rockefeller Center's outdoor plaza. By 1939, The Rink became a permanent fixture. Since then, it has evolved into one of the city’s most legendary landmarks and one of the most visited sites in Manhattan, hosting more than a quarter of a million skaters annually.

  • Things to do
  • Markets and fairs

The Winter Village at Bryant Park has returned in all its holiday glory. On the grounds, you can peruse more than 180 shopping and food kiosks—all at one of the best NYC parks. Expect loads of handmade, unique and New York City-specific gifts for your family and friends. Work up an appetite at the 17,000-square-foot ice-skating rink and then fill up at the rinkside pop-up restaurant called The Lodge for festive cocktails and hearty food.

Don't miss the Small Business Spotlight booth, which features local minority-owned business. 

The Winter Village will be open through March 3, 2024.

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  • Things to do

There's something unusual "blooming" among Bella Abzug Park's natural fauna.

Part of a solo exhibition by Korean American artist Sui Park, this outdoor installation in Hudson Yards features the artist's biomorphic sculptures, which are shockingly made using plastic materials like zip ties and fishing line.

For Park, who trained as both an architect and in the ancient art of Korean basketry, "nature is a sacred space that allows her to slow down, consider her surroundings, acknowledge her thoughts, and find inspiration," reads a press release. "With this exhibition, she captures that sentiment using humble materials and reconstructs them into whimsical forms, awakening one’s senses and encouraging others to connect with their thoughts as well as their surroundings."

See the artwork now through fall 2024.

  • Things to do

Oppenheimer took over movie screens last summer, and now you can learn about the physicist's New York City connections on these new walking tours. 

This nearly three-hour stroll through the Upper West Side explores how New York City raised the "father of the atomic bomb" and the "destroyer of worlds." Learn about J. Robert Oppenheimer’s early years on the west side of Manhattan and how his education shaped his adulthood. The tour also showcases the sites of the Manhattan Project and explores the legacy left by the atomic bomb.

Here's the full schedule of Oppenheimer tours.

The tour's hosted by K. Krombie's Purefinder tours, which also run tours called "Death in New York," "The Psychiatric History of New York" and "Hell Gate." Each one explore the city's darker side through meticulously researched and theatrically presented historical narratives. 

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  • Art
  • Art

The vibrant, ornate stained glass windows inside Manhattan's historic churches always create a dazzling spectacle. But now, a new long-term art display inspired by those rich colors has unfurled inside the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Morningside Heights—the world's largest Gothic cathedral

Titled "Divine Pathways," the monumental art installation is made up of more than 1,100 lengths of blue, red and gold fabric. Each ribbon measures 75 feet in length (approximately seven stories high). Combined, they are almost 16 miles long—that's longer than the island of Manhattan!  

St. John the Divine is open daily for self-guided sightseeing tours with a $15/adult admission fee; timed tickets are recommended. "Divine Pathways" will be on view through June 2024. 

  • Art
  • Art

Beautiful, buoyant, beguiling bubbles are coming back to the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) in Queens as of Friday, November 17. The beloved bubbles exhibit, which has been closed for five years, will return bigger, better and bubblier than ever.

The Big Bubble Experiment encourages kids of all ages to experiment and discover through the joy of playing with bubbles. That includes blowing, stretching, popping and looking closely to see what happens at each move. 

The exhibit features 10 stations, each one with different tools and methods for exploring bubble solution.

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

Majestic, incredible elephants are getting the spotlight in a new exhibit at The American Museum of Natural History. "The Secret World of Elephants" showcases both modern and ancient elephants, offering visitors a chance to see a full-scale model of a woolly mammoth, learn about what elephants eat, touch an elephant's tooth, listen to elephant calls and more.

The exhibition is now open in the museum’s LeFrak Family Gallery. An additional ticket is required to visit the exhibit; museum members can visit for free.

  • Things to do
  • Events & Festivals

Explore "The End of Fossil Fuel," the latest pop-up from the NYC Climate Museum. It's free to visit in Soho and offers a bevy of eye-opening activities for all ages.

Inside the gallery, a collection of maps will put climate change issues into perspective, alongside text panels about the history of the fossil fuel industry. The exhibits trace the origins of the climate and inequality crises and how we got to where we are today. Other activations include a sticker wall where visitors commit to specific climate actions and a kids' corner with books and drawing materials.

Find the pop-up at 105 Wooster Street in Soho through at least December. The museum is free to visit and open to all. It's open Wednesdays-Sundays from 1-6pm. 

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  • Art
  • Art

When the 50,000 runners crossed the finish line at the annual New York City Marathon on November 5, they were joined in spirit by Joe Yancey Jr. and Ted Corbitt, two men who shaped the epic road race into what it is today. 

Remarkable Black athletes and coaches, Yancey and Corbitt helped break the color barrier and revolutionize long-distance running in the United States and across the globe. Just in time for the marathon, a new exhibit at the New-York Historical Society in Manhattan will honor their legacies. 

The exhibit, titled "Running for Civil Rights: The New York Pioneer Club, 1936–1976,” runs through February 25, 2024. It explores how the New York City Marathon grew out of decades of activism for racial justice.

  • Art

In a pioneering exhibition, the Brooklyn Museum will present the first-ever museum show dedicated to zines by artists in North America. "Copy Machine Manifestos: Artists Who Make Zines" encompasses more than 800 objects examining how artists have used the medium of zines over the past half century.

This exhibition explores the largely unexamined, yet vibrant aesthetic practice of zines. Zines have been widely used to create and foster communities outside of dominant culture since the early 1970s, when more affordable reproduction technologies like the photocopy machine became widely accessible. The exhibition documents the zine’s relationship to a range of avant-garde practices and intersections with other mediums, including painting, drawing, collage, photography, performance, sculpture, video, and film. From conceptual art to punk and street culture to queer and feminist practices, this canon-expanding exhibition interrogates hierarchies between media and features artworks by nearly one hundred artists.

It'll be on view November 17, 2023–March 31, 2024.

 

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  • Art
  • Art

When Jack Kliger, President & CEO of the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in Battery Park City, and his team started working on a new kid-friendly exhibit about the Holocaust almost four years ago, they could not have imagined the chaotic world order that the show was eventually going to premiere in.

"Courage to Act: Rescue in Denmark" tells the story of the Danish Rescue, when citizens of the European country came together to usher nearly 7,000 Jews to safety and away from concentration camps during World War II.

  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic
  • Midtown EastOpen run

There's a reason Chamber Magic has remained a staple in NYC's magic scene for more than two decades: It dazzles, show after show, with tricks that'll still leave you awestruck days later. 

The charming Steve Cohen, billed as the Millionaires’ Magician, conjures high-class parlor magic in the marble-columned Madison Room at the swank Lotte New York Palace. Dress to be impressed (cocktail attire is required); tickets start at $125, with an option to pay more for meet-and-greet time and extra tricks with Cohen after the show. If you've come to see a classic-style magic act, you get what you pay for.

Sporting a tuxedo and bright rust hair, the magician delivers routines that he has buffed to a patent-leather gleam: In addition to his signature act—"Think-a-Drink," involving a kettle that pours liquids by request—highlights include a lulu of levitation trick and a card-trick finale that leaves you feeling like, well, a million bucks.

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  • Art
  • Art

He's one of our most famous New Yorkers—and now legendary director Spike Lee (Do The Right Thing, Crooklyn, The 25th Hour) is getting his own immersive installation at the Brooklyn Museum this fall.

Running through February 4, 2024, "Spike Lee: Creative Sources" will delve into the world, works and influences of the acclaimed director who, though born in Atlanta, Georgia, was raised and revered as one of New York's own, particularly in the borough of Brooklyn. 

The exhibit will feature more than 300 works from Lee's personal collection, "items that have been touchpoints for Lee and the topics he explores on-screen," the museum said.

  • Things to do
  • Weird & Wonderful

In New York City, it can be hard to find an apartment with a nice bathtub you'd actually want to soak in. Heck, it can be hard to find an apartment where the shower isn't in a closet in the living room (ahem, this $1.25 million StreetEasy listing).

But now cosmetics company LUSH is solving that very New York problem with a new book-a-bath service just launched this week. In addition to indulgent baths, LUSH Spa Lexington also offers massage treatments and facials, creating a calming oasis near hectic midtown. Find the newly opened spa on the Upper East Side at Lexington Avenue and East 61st Street.

Given the fact that LUSH invented the bath bomb, they’re pros when it comes to bathing. For the book-a-bath experience, head through the store and climb the stairs to the spa. Inside a petite pink-and-white bathroom, a clawfoot tub beckons. Before your bath, a staff member will prepare the water with a Snow Fairy bath bomb, which creates glittery pastel pink water. Plus, they’ll offer a fresh face mask tailored for your skin, a curated playlist and a cup of vegan hot chocolate. 

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  • Art

Check out the brand-new mural by Brooklyn-based artist Steffi Lynn Tsai at 25 Kent in Brooklyn. Wedged between Williamsburg and Greenpoint, the vibrant mural is a reflection of the creative community around it, with an appropriate and resounding message in tough times: "Enjoy the Process, It Starts Here."

  • Art

For the first time, a New York museum will present a comprehensive survey of work by feminist artist Judy Chicago. "Judy Chicago: Herstory" will span the artist's 60-year career across painting, sculpture, installation, drawing, textiles, photography, stained glass, needlepoint, and printmaking.

"Herstory" will trace the entirety of Chicago’s practice from her 1960s experiments in Minimalism and her revolutionary feminist art of the 1970s to her narrative series of the 1980s and 1990s in which she expanded her focus to confront environmental disaster, birth and creation, masculinity, and mortality. Contextualizing her feminist methodology within the many art movements in which she participated—and from whose histories she has frequently been erased—"Herstory" will showcase Chicago’s tremendous impact on American art and highlight her critical role as a cultural historian claiming space for women artists previously omitted from the canon.

See the show through March 3, 2024.

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  • Art

Can cow manure be turned into casings for loudspeakers and lamps? MoMA’s latest exhibition says “yes.”

“Life Cycles: The Materials of Contemporary Design” is now open on the museum’s street-level gallery. The exhibit explores the ways designers can repurpose the materials around us to extend their life cycle and promote environmental preservation. Approximately 80 pieces will be on display, including bricks made from crop waste and fungi mycelium and panels made from corn husks. 

The exhibition, curated by Paola Antonelli, will be on display until July 7, 2024.

  • Sports and fitness
  • Sports & Fitness

Wild Captives, the nation’s first female- and LGBTQ-owned archery studio, is now open. It's a place where everyone can "be their own superhero." The studio in Brooklyn’s Industry City offers empowering and fun hour-long introduction to archery classes every weekend for $45/person. 

Each intro class includes a chance to learn about different parts of the bow and safety requirements. After the lesson, each participant gets a chance to shoot the bow trying to pop a balloon pinned onto the bullseye. Intro-to-archery classes are available each Friday, Saturday and Sunday, bookable online for anyone over age 12.

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

America’s first Black popular music icon is getting his due with a massive new center that houses a 60,000-piece collection and a venue for live music, lectures and screenings.

NYC’s Louis Armstrong House Museum has now opened its new facility, the Louis Armstrong Center—and it’s a big deal!

The space acts as a permanent home for the 60,000-piece Louis Armstrong Archive (the world’s largest for a jazz musician containing photos, recordings, manuscripts, letters & mementos) and a 75-seat venue for performances, lectures, films, and educational experiences.

The Center and the historic house are now open to the public Thursdays through Saturdays. Tickets can be purchased at louisarmstronghouse.org. Tours have limited capacity, so book in advance.

  • Things to do
  • Events & Festivals

The phrase “women’s work” is often used derisively to indicate labor that’s seen as “less than,” but a new exhibit at New-York Historical Society reclaims that phrase. Aptly titled "Women's Work," the show chronicles the history of women's contributions to labor and how those efforts are both inherently political and essential to American society. 

The exhibit features dozens of objects in the museum's collection from indenture documents to medical kits to military uniforms. With items ranging from the 1740s to today, the show celebrates the strides society has made in equality while not shying away from highlighting the gender-based inequalities that persist today.

It's on view thorugh August 18, 2024. 

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  • Art
  • Art

For more than 50 years, El Museo del Barrio has been curating a complex and culturally diverse collection. Now, for the first time in more than two decades, the museum will present its most ambitious presentation of that permanent collection with 500 artworks, including more than 100 new acquisitions. 

The exhibition called "Something Beautiful: Reframing La Colección" is now open and will remain on view through March 10, 2024 with different pieces rotating in and out. El Museo del Barrio, located in the city's East Harlem neighborhood known as "El Barrio," is the nation's leading Latinx and Latin American cultural institution. 

See it at at El Museo del Barrio in Manhattan's East Harlem neighborhood. Adult admission is $9.

  • Things to do

If you're not a paint-and-sip kind of person, try Act & Sip, a beer-fueled acting workshop in an Off-Broadway Theater with expert instructors. They pair students off with partners and hand over the pages to a scene from a well-known iconic NYC sitcom or movie, offering tips along the way to help performers conquer stage fright and discover their inner actor.

This event is perfect for bachelorette parties, after-work outings, or just a fun night with friends to get on stage with a little help from liquid courage. You don't need any experience, but you must be 21 or older and BYOB.

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

Muggles, take note: You won’t need to travel through Platform 9¾ to get to Hogwarts. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter is right here in New York City for a limited time.

The touring show, “Harry Potter: The Exhibition,” is now open in Herald Square, and it’s going transport you. Through the use of dramatic lighting, set design, interactive technology and even scent, the exhibit will make you feel like you are actually there—in Hagrid’s hut, in potions class, dining in the Great Hall, learning how to fight the dark arts, fighting the Battle of Hogwarts and more.

Tickets are on sale now, starting at $29 for adults.

  • Art
  • Art

On a typical visit to the Museum of Modern Art, crowds surround the most precious paintings, and it can be tough to squeeze your way in for a photo, let alone to admire the artwork’s brushstrokes. But now, thanks to these new exclusive tours by GetYourGuide, you can get in before the museum opens for a guided tour of amazing artwork. 

The new MoMA Before Hours Tour with Art Expert is available now; tickets are on sale here for $99/person. Few New York City experiences compare to the absolute thrill of gazing at famed works of art uninterrupted for as long as you like.  

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  • Movies
  • Movies

With a full restaurant, craft cocktails, comfy reclining seats and even more bells and whistles, this new movie theater in Hell's Kitchen elevates the movie-going experience. LOOK Dine-in Cinemas is now open in VIA 57 West, the pyramid-shaped building located at West 57th Street and 11th Avenue. 

With a 15-year lease, LOOK's operating in a 25,000-square-foot venue that used to house Landmark cinema until it closed in 2020. This is the company's first New York City location. At this fancy theater, you can relax in a heated seat while ordering dinner directly to your seat in the theater. 

  • Things to do
  • Weird & Wonderful

Many museums start with some kind of orientation, like a map or remarks from a docent. But not The House of Cannabis (a.k.a. THC NYC), the new weed museum now open in Soho. Instead, this museum starts, quite fittingly, with a trippy “Disorientation Room.”

While the museum boasts plenty of mind-bending multi-sensory bells and whistles, it also showcases art, highlights science and confronts the social justice issues baked into cannabis prosecution. The museum, the first of its kind at this scale, packs every inch of its four-story, 25,000-square-foot space at 427 Broadway with fascinating facts and delightful immersive experiences fit to entertain both tokers and non-smokers alike. Tickets ($35/adult) are on sale here.

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  • Things to do
  • Events & Festivals

Find your latest read at The Free Black Women’s Library, a new free library in Brooklyn's Bed-Stuy neighborhood, which also serves as a social art project, a reading room, a co-working space and a community gathering center. The library "celebrates the brilliance, diversity and imagination of Black women and Black non-binary authors." All 5,000 books in the library's collection are written by Black women and non-binary authors.

Here's how it works: Anybody can visit the space to read, work or hang out. If you want to take a book home, simply bring a book written by a Black woman or Black non-binary author, and you can trade. Whether you decide to bring the book back after you're done reading or keep it for your collection is up to you.

The library is currently open four days per week (Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday) at 226 Marcus Garvey Boulevard. In addition to offering a space to read or work, the library has also hosts a book club, art shows and workshops on topics like writing, drawing, poetry, painting and sewing. All are welcome. 

  • Things to do

The name really says it all: Make bonsai in a bar! These teeny tiny trees are the definition of "happy little trees." 

The pros from Bonsai Bar will teach you the fundamental skills and techniques behind the art of bonsai while you sip your drink and have some fun with your friends. The teachers will also help you as you pot, prune and design your very own bonsai tree. 

Bonsai Bar events pop up all over the city at locations like Brooklyn Brewery, the Bronx Brewery and SingleCut Beersmiths Queens Taproom.

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  • Art
  • Art

Peek inside this new, teeny-tiny shop in Harlem to find some fun gifts for someone on your list or for yourself.

MoonLab 42 measures in at just under 5 feet wide, but the store manages to house zines, books, records, incense, prints, candles, decorative objects, ceramics, jewelry, accessories, clothing and more. “It feels like a Mary Poppins bag,” Ruso Margishvili, the concept store’s co-owner tells us.

 

  • Things to do
  • Weird & Wonderful

On a typical tour of Manhattan, the big tourist attractions—Times Square, the Empire State Building, Central Park—get all the attention. But on these new walking tours by a local author, you'll see fascinating historical sites that you won't find in a typical guidebook. 

K. Krombie's Purefinder tours, "Death in New York," "The Psychiatric History of New York" and "Hell Gate," explore the city's darker side through meticulously researched and theatrically presented historical narratives.

Each tour covers about 2.5 miles in about two-and-a-half hours. “Death in New York” and “The Psychiatric History of New York” are offered weekly, while “Hell Gate” is offered twice per month. Tours cost $32-$34 per person; you can book one here.

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  • Theater
  • Theater & Performance

From amazing costumes to Broadway history to fun photo opps, this long-awaited new museum is a must-see for theater buffs.  

You can expect the new museum to highlight over 500 individual productions from the 1700s all the way to the present. 

Among the standout offerings will also be a special exhibit dubbed "The Making of a Broadway Show," which honors the on- and off-stage community that helps bring plays and musicals to life multiple times a week. 

  • Comedy

This is the only stand-up comedy show in a Brooklyn Boathouse, boasting some of the best local talent for free on the shore of the Gowanus Canal. Cuba Libre BYOB but beer, seltzers and non-alcoholic beverages are available for donation. Go see it every Friday night; check the group's Instagram for the weekly lineup.

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  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic

AirOtic Soiree is bringing the heat to Hell's Kitchen with a 21+ cabaret-style performane showcasing incredible aerial acrobatics in a titillating, sensual style. The show takes audiences through an intense story of love, passion, sexuality and eroticism through an immersive circus and cabaret experience including extravagant costumes, seductive choreography and circus artistry. 

During the show, dine on dinner and decadent dessert towers curated by celebrity chef Saul Montiel. Before and after the performance, cocktails will be available for purchase.

See it at HK Hall, a historic venue with striking decor in the heart of Hell’s Kitchen, with performances through April 2024. 

  • Art
  • Art

The New York Public Library dug through its expansive and centuries-spanning archive to stage an impressive free exhibition filled with cultural artifacts. "The Polonsky Exhibition of New York Public Library’s Treasures" spans 4,000 years of history and includes a wide range of history-making pieces, including the only surviving letter from Christoper Columbus announcing his “discovery” of the Americas to King Ferdinand’s court and the first Gutenberg Bible brought over to the Americas.

New treasures were just added to the exhibit this fall, including a signed, first edition copy of "Passing" by Nella Larsen, a selection of manuscript pages from "The Waste Land" by T.S. Eliot, and a miniature early 19th-century Qur’an, produced in Turkey.

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  • Things to do
  • Weird & Wonderful

Part visual splendor, part olfactory wonder and part ooey-gooey sensory fun, Sloomoo Institute’s slime museum re-opened this fall after a renovation. This captivating playground welcomes all ages to its home in SoHo—or “SooHoo,” in Sloomoo parlance (see what they did there?).

Here are five things not to miss at Sloomoo, including a chance to get slimed and a DIY slime making activity.

  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

Have some fun this weekend and go check out Gamehaus, a giant new arcade and beer hall just opened in Long Island City. This 5,000-square-foot multifunctional space features a dozen large-screen TVs, classic video games and loads of beers.

Classice arcade games include Atari Pong, Ms. Pacman, Jurassic Park, Pop-a-Shot and Skee Ball. 

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  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

A new nightlife venue called Deluxx Fluxx has taken over the former Studio at Webster Hall location, a 4,200-square-foot space beneath the famed music venue in the East Village, inspired by early arcades, punk rock, hip-hop and graffiti culture.

The venue brings "an immersive visual and audial art space and arcade" that promises to reinvigorate the artist-centric venues that defined New York City nightlife in the early 2000s. Part interactive art project and part performance venue, expect live entertainment, DJs, pinball machines, "artfully weird" video games, custom video work, costumed performers, floor-to-ceiling blacklight art interiors and a day-glo design palette. Some of the arcade games offer their own New York City flair, like Crown Heights King where pigeons battle to be the king of the neighborhood.

Here's more about the nightlife venue.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Still working on that screenplay? Say goodbye to writer's block (hopefully) at Soho's newest coffee shop and creative space.

The Lost Draft, a newly opened film-inspired multipurpose space at 398 Broome Street (between Mulberry Street and Cleveland Place) promises to be a refuge for those eager to finally get those creative ideas on paper. Or on screen. 

Stop procrastinating and start writing, because The Lost Draft is open seven days a week from 7am-9pm, offering plenty of time to be creative. Here's our full story on the new cafe.

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

A bucolic 1920s English country golf club is on its way to NYC's concrete jungle! But with a twist. Swingers NoMad, a "crazy mini-golf course" and entertainment complex straight from London brought with it three nine-hole golf courses across 23,000 square feet under 20-foot-high ceilings.

"Crazy golf" is a British spin on mini-golf, but it's for a 21-and-over audience since craft cocktails are served by caddies on the course, and at Swingers NoMad, there will be six cocktail bars with signature classic cocktails from London and D.C., as well as 12 cocktails created specifically for Swingers NoMad, private rooms you can rent, an opulent clubhouse and four gourmet street food vendors—Sauce Pizzeria, Miznon, Fonda and Mah Ze Dahr Bakery.

  • Things to do
  • Markets and fairs

The Brooklyn Flea is undoubtedly one of the most popular flea markets to hit in NYC if you're looking for the best selection of throwback wares and records, which you certainly wouldn’t find in just any vintage clothing store or record store in the city.

The food selection is also top-notch since the creators also operate one of the city’s best food markets: Smorgasburg

The Brooklyn Flea DUMBO is now open for the season. Brooklyn Flea also operates in Chelsea year-round on Saturdays and Sundays, 8am-5pm, and the new Hester Flea on Saturdays, 11am-6pm.

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  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

It's not every day that a new nightclub opens in New York City, especially one that harkens back to an old sort of New York—when nightclubs were the city's premiere destinations for some after-hours fun. That's why Daphne, a new subterranean spot under Hotel 50 Bowery in Chinatown, is so special. 

Upon entering the massive 2,500-square-foot space, patrons are pleasantly surprised to find a beautiful silk pink flower installation by art studio Floratorium. Dazzling disco balls also permeate the premises, calling back to a time when the dance club you frequented was just as important as where your apartment was located. 

Shake Rattle & Roll Dueling Pianos
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Every Saturday night, two piano men battle it out to prove who is truly the master of all 88 keys, with a playlist decided entirely by the audience. Whether you’re in the mood for Billy Joel, Christina Aguilera or current chart toppers, these pianists are up for the challenge. But they expect you to do your part by singing along, but from home. Grab a ticket and request songs in advance.

More things to do in NYC this weekend

The 50 best things to do in NYC for locals and tourists
  • Things to do

Every day, our staffers are eating, drinking, partying, gigging and generally appreciating their way throughout this fair town of ours. Which makes pinning down the most essential New York activities kinda…tough. We need to include the classics, naturally—art museums in NYC, stellar New York attractions, killer bars and restaurants in NYC—but also spotlight the more recent or little-known gems that we truly love. Consider the below your NYC Bible.

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