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10 Best Art & Design shows of 2010 in no particular order

“Dan Gunn: Multistable Picture Fable,” Lloyd Dobler Gallery, Sept 11–Oct 16. TOC contributor Candice Weber wrote, “Gunn...

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Work by Dan Gunn from "Multistable Picture Fable" at Lloyd Dobler Gallery. Photograph: Courtesy of Dan Gunn.
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From "Felipe Dulzaides: Utop�a Posible" at the Graham Foundation: Felipe Dulzaides, Next Time It Rains (video still), 1999-2010.
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From "Jon Rafman: The Age Demanded" at Golden Age: Jon Rafman, The Age Demanded #1, 2010.
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From "La Frontera: The Cultural Impact of Mexican Migration" at the Museum of Contemporary Photography: David Taylor, Smugglers, Sonora, 2009.
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From "Modern in America: Works on Paper 1900-50s" at the Art Institute of Chicago: Jacob Lawrence, Free Clinic, 1937. Photograph: Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago.
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From "Moholy: An Education of the Senses" at Loyola University Museum of Art: L�szl� Moholy-Nagy, Untitled (Ellen Frank), 1929. Photograph: � 2009 Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, courtesy of George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film, Rochester, New York.
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From "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Museum Collections and �Deaccessioning�� at DePaul University Museum: Ludwig Sohler, Landscape: Lake and Spruces, date unknown.
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From "Roger Brown: Calif. U.S.A." at the Hyde Park Art Center: A reconstruction of Brown's Jesus Table from the late artist's home and studio in La Conchita, California. Photograph: Roger Brown Study Collection.
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From "Translating Revolution: U.S. Artists Interpret Mexican Muralists� at the National Museum of Mexican Art: Edward Millman, cartoon for Contribution of Women to the Progress of Mankind, 1936.
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From "William Eggleston: Democratic Camera, Photographs and Video, 1961-2008" at the Art Institute of Chicago: William Eggleston. Untitled, 1970, from "Los Alamos," 1965-68 and 1972-74 (published 2003). Photograph: � Eggleston Artistic Trust, courtesy of Cheim & Read, New York.

“Dan Gunn: Multistable Picture Fable,” Lloyd Dobler Gallery, Sept 11–Oct 16. TOC contributor Candice Weber wrote, “Gunn simultaneously makes a case for painting’s relevancy and acknowledges its ambiguous role in 21st-century art.”

 

“Dan Gunn: Multistable Picture Fable,” Lloyd Dobler Gallery, Sept 11–Oct 16. TOC contributor Candice Weber wrote, “Gunn simultaneously makes a case for painting’s relevancy and acknowledges its ambiguous role in 21st-century art.”

“Felipe Dulzaides: Utopía Posible,”Graham Foundation, Apr 30–Jul 17. We were moved to tears by Dulzaides’s multimedia portrait of Cuba’s National Art Schools—a breathtaking campus abandoned in the 1960s before its completion.

“Jon Rafman: The Age Demanded,” Golden Age, Oct 29–Dec 10. TOC contributor Jonathan Kinkley believes Rafman roams Google Street View “like a contemporary Robert Frank…[His] attempt to celebrate and humanize digital media has staying power.”

“La Frontera: The Cultural Impact of Mexican Migration,”Museum of Contemporary Photography, Oct 8–Dec 22. Photographs from both sides of the Mexico-U.S. border suggest it’s silly and dangerous for Americans to believe that we can differentiate “us” from “them.”

“Modern in America: Works on Paper, 1900–50s,” Art Institute of Chicago, Jan 30–May 2. Candice called this exhibition of prints, drawings and watercolors from the Art Institute’s permanent collection, which featured iconic American artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe and Jacob Lawrence, “a perfect introduction to its subject.”

“Moholy: An Education of the Senses,” Loyola University Museum of Art, Feb 11–May 9. Jonathan thought this well-designed exhibition did justice to Bauhaus instructor and Institute of Design founder László Moholy-Nagy’s (1895–1946) illustrious career.

“The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Museum Collections and Deaccessioning,” DePaul University Museum, Jan 14–Mar 19. The art in this exhibition was awful, but that was the point: DePaul’s timely show presented works that the museum intended to remove from its collection to demystify the process of deaccessioning.

“Roger Brown: Calif USA,”Hyde Park Art Center, Jun 20–Oct 3. Guest curator Nick Lowe found the best possible way to display late works by our favorite Imagist: alongside the collections of vernacular art and knickknacks that inspired Brown (1941–97) when he lived in California.

“Translating Revolution U.S. Artists Interpret Mexican Muralists,” National Museum of Mexican Art, Feb 12–Aug 1. We didn’t know how much Diego Rivera and other Mexican artists had influenced Americans such as Jackson Pollock, Elizabeth Catlett and Margaret Burroughs until we saw this illuminating exhibition of 20th-century art.

“William Eggleston: Democratic Camera, Photographs and Video, 1961–2008,” Art Institute of Chicago, Feb 27–May 23. Don’t tell anyone, but we had much more fun at this retrospective of Eggleston’s pioneering color photos than we did at the Art Institute’s “Matisse: Radical Invention, 1913–17.”

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