Fall Preview | “The Newberry 125” exhibition

We offer a glimpse inside the exhibit.
 (Photograph: The Newberry Library)
1/6
Photograph: The Newberry LibraryPahl-Lee, Elbridge Ayer Burbank, 1898Fearing Native Americans would face extinction, early Field Museum benefactor Edward Ayer convinced his nephew, Burbank, to create portraits of Native Americans. The result: more than 1,200 works, including a Newberry-owned painting of Geronimo (the only one of its kind) and a painting of the Hopi woman seen here. The squash blossom braids reveal her unmarried status.
 (Photograph: The Newberry Library)
2/6
Photograph: The Newberry LibraryChicago Cubs and White Sox cigarette baseball cards, 1909-11Imagine Cubs outfielder Alfonso Soriano posing for a Newport ad. In the players� defense, the Surgeon General�s warning wouldn�t arrive on packs until nearly six decades later.
 (Photograph: The Newberry Library)
3/6
Photograph: The Newberry LibraryParadise Lost, John Milton (author), Sangorski & Sutcliffe (binder), 1910s or �20sAn heiress to a meatpacking company, Helen Swift Neilson adored ornamental book bindings. From her collection gifted to the Newberry is Milton�s epic poem laced in gold, leather and snakeskin.
4/6
The Slave�s Friend, R.G. Williams for Anti-Slavery Society, 1836The cartoons in this children�s book, featuring the original covers, relied on Christian beliefs to promote eradicating antebellum slavery.
 (Photograph: The Newberry Library)
5/6
Photograph: The Newberry Library�Conservati Fedele (Stay Faithful)�, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, 1765This handwritten aria signed by the nine-year-old prodigy composer is one of the most important autographed scores at the library.
 (Photograph: The Newberry Library)
6/6
Photograph: The Newberry Library�Conservati Fedele (Stay Faithful)�, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, 1765This handwritten aria signed by the nine-year-old prodigy composer is one of the most important autographed scores at the library.
By D.L. Hopkins |
Advertising

“The Newberry 125” exhibition (newberry.org) runs September 6–December 31. Free.

Advertising