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Anna Bogutskaya

Anna Bogutskaya

Articles (3)

The 66 Greatest Movie Monsters

The 66 Greatest Movie Monsters

Great movie monsters come in all shapes and forms – some, more than one. Of course, they’re usually frightening and seriously uncanny. But what unites them all is their gift for skulking into our subconscious and making a home there. Every movie lover’s brain contains a crypt of demons, beasts and critters waiting to lurch forth at unexpected moments.  The finest cine-critters don’t even necessarily haunt the greatest films. B-movies, VHS schlockers and even the odd forgettable blockbuster have yielded some of the best beasts on this list. Salutes are due to special effects wizards like Ray Harryhausen and make-up legends Rob Bottin, Ve Neill and Stan Winston who brought so many of them to life, conjuring dread in their every design flourish and appreciating the power to alarm of an unexpected mandible or warty haunch. Before we start the countdown, a few parameters: this list steers away from human and animal forms. So Jaws and Arachnophobia are out, shark-octopus hybrids and flying monkeys are in. Slasher villains are barred, so there’s no Freddy or Jason here, but zombies, vampires and trolls are all eligible.Having already celebrated the best monster movies features in the canon, it’s time to switch on a torch, grab a pitchfork and take a walk through the gory, shiversome and plain unnerving pantheon of the monsters themselves to find out what makes them tick – or growl. Oh, and if you want to see a few of these critters in their natural environment – the big screen – the

La Chica Salvaje

La Chica Salvaje

⭑⭑✩✩✩ Abandonada por su familia y sus hermanos cuando era una niña, Kya (Daisy Edgar-Jones) crece y se convierte en una joven ingeniosa, aunque tímida, a la que le encanta dibujar y pasar el rato en el pantano donde ha pasado toda su vida. Nunca aprende a leer ni asiste a la escuela, y la gente del pueblo se burla implacablemente de ella por ser rara (léase: pobre).  Cuando el arrogante exmariscal de campo Chase Andrews (Harris Dickinson) aparece muerto, los dedos apuntan a Kya y las pruebas que la incriminan como el asesino comienzan a acumularse.  Basada en el bestseller internacional de Delia Owens (quien ella misma está implicada en un turbio asesinato), esta pegajosa película gótica sureña tiene todos los ingredientes de una película de prestigio y anzuelo para premios. La película cambia entre contarnos la historia de vida de Kya y su juicio por asesinato, con Edgar-Jones haciendo mucho trabajo para mantenernos interesados ​​en lo que, en última instancia, es una película muy insulsa. No hay química entre ninguno de los actores, y no hay propulsión a la historia, aparte de descubrir quién asesinó a Chase, o si fue asesinado.  Los espesos paisajes de los pantanos de Carolina del Norte (en realidad filmados en Luisiana) siempre han sido un gran telón de fondo para el asesinato, pero  Crawdads  pronto se deshace de sus elementos góticos potencialmente apasionantes para un romance  filmado como un brillante anuncio de televisión. Ahogue sus bostezos mientras Kya se enamor

Jake Gyllenhaal y Eiza González protagonizan Ambulancia

Jake Gyllenhaal y Eiza González protagonizan Ambulancia

⭑⭑✩✩✩ Libre de las garras robóticas de la franquicia de Transformers y su último thriller 6 Underground, directo a Netflix, Michael Bay regresa a donde pertenece: una persecución de autos en Los Ángeles rodeado de hombres musculosos y sudorosos.  El veterano de guerra Will Sharp (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II), que necesita urgentemente dinero en efectivo para pagar la cirugía no especificada de su esposa, le pide ayuda a su hermano adoptivo Danny (Jake Gyllenhaal), un criminal de carrera, como último recurso. Abdul-Mateen II es el más arraigado de los dos, mientras que Gyllenhaal nos mira con ojos de loco.Lo que se suponía que era un trabajo fácil se vuelve realmente complicado, muy rápido, y los dos hermanos se encuentran en una persecución policial en todo Los Ángeles con un policía herido en la parte trasera de la ambulancia que han secuestrado. Si muere, sus sentencias serán mucho más severas. La férrea EMT Cam (Eliza González) completa este escenario desquiciado, un contrapeso relativamente cuerdo para la extraña pareja de hermanos mientras intenta mantener con vida al policía.  Ambulancia es una nueva versión de una película danesa de 2005 del mismo nombre. Siempre está sucediendo algo, muy fuerte, y todo el mundo se preocupa por verse muy bien mientras sucede. La mayor parte de la acción ocurre dentro de la ambulancia titular, y gracias a Bay por hacer que se sienta tan apretada y frenética como exige la historia a través de primeros planos sudorosos y bromas lunáticas. Su cá

Listings and reviews (5)

Bones and All

Bones and All

4 out of 5 stars

Cannibals in love are uncomfortable but well trodden territory in horror. From Claire Denis' masterpiece of desire Trouble Every Day to the zom-rom-com Warm Bodies. In Bones and All, the cannibals are two young loners feeling their way through desire, love and belonging. Director Luca Guadagnino imbues his adaptation of Camille DeAngelis's YA novel with the same breezy warmth of Call Me By Your Name.   Backdropped against Reagan’s ’80s, it has 18-year-old Maren (Taylor Russell) carrying a burden too large to share at a sleepover. Since infancy, she’s had a barely-contained urge to, well, chomp on human flesh. Everytime it get the best of her and an attack happens, she and her father (André Holland) have had to pack up and move. When we meet them, this routine of self-imposed exile has become too much for him to bear, and he abandons Maren with a small wad of cash, her birth certificate and a cassette explaining why he’s bailed.  Alone – and hungry – Maren sets out on the American road, encountering fellow ‘Eaters’ with the same primal urges as her for the first time. First comes the quirky but menacing Sully (Mark Rylance, chewing scenery); then the willowy, existentially disenfranchised Lee (Timothée Chalamet). Drawn together by circumstance, a shared dietary requirement, and an awkward attraction, they take to the road to find Maren’s biological mother.  Is a heartthrob still a heartthrob if he’s soaked in blood? Here, the answer is yes The film flows like a Joy Division s

Watcher

Watcher

4 out of 5 stars

There’s a book of essays by Siri Hustvedt provocatively titled ‘A Woman Looking at Men Looking at Women’. American filmmaker Chloe Okuno’s debut feature, Watcher, could well be titled ‘A Woman Looking At Men Looking At Her’.  Maika Monroe, who jumped onto the genre scene with two brilliant turns in one year, The Guest and It Follows, has not really made a film worthy of her talents since then. That same year, Okuno released her acclaimed slasher short Slut.  These two talents meet in the Bucharest-set thriller Watcher, where Monroe plays Julia, the quiet (not to be confused with timid) wife of a marketing exec (Karl Glusman), who has been recently relocated due to a promotion. With her husband busy with his new job, and unable to speak Romanian, Julia wanders around and observes. There’s also a serial killer on the loose in the city, as there is wont to be in a psychological thriller. Almost immediately after moving in, Julia notices the shadowy figure of a man looking at her through the window. She is instantly creeped out and asks everyone around her to check in on this, which, to be fair to them, they do. But no one is able to determine who this man is or if he is, really, watching her. It taps into the anxiety of being watched that will be familiar to any woman The anxiety of being watched will be familiar to any woman, and Okuno’s direction taps into it with precision. The film’s atmosphere is oppressive: the grand windows in their flat turn Julia into an open target; sh

Where the Crawdads Sing

Where the Crawdads Sing

2 out of 5 stars

Abandoned by her family and siblings as a little girl, Kya (Daisy Edgar-Jones) grows up to be a resourceful, if shy, young woman with a love for drawing and hanging out in the marsh where she’s spent her entire life. She never learns how to read or attends school, and is relentlessly mocked by the townsfolk for being weird (read: poor).  When the cocky former quarterback Chase Andrews (Harris Dickinson) shows up dead, fingers are pointed at Kya and evidence incriminating her as the murderer start mounting.  Based on the international bestseller by Delia Owens (who herself is implicated in a murky murder), this sticky southern gothic has all the ingredients of a prestige, awards-bait film. The film shifts between telling us Kya’s swampcore life story and her trial for murder, with Edgar-Jones doing a lot of work to keep us interested in what is ultimately a very bland film. There is no chemistry between any of the actors, and no propulsion to the story, other than finding out who actually murdered Chase, or if he was murdered at all.  With no chemistry between the actors, it’s more aesthetic than film The thick landscapes of the North Carolina marshes (actually filmed in Louisiana) have always been a great backdrop for murder, but Crawdads soon jettisons its potentially gripping gothic elements for a romance shot like a glossy TV ad. Stifle your yawns as Kya falls in love with fellow nature-loving hunk Tate (Taylor John Smith), only to get abandoned again. Where the Crawdads

Aftersun

Aftersun

5 out of 5 stars

Nothing much happens in Aftersun, but every moment matters. Divorced dad Calum (played by Normal People’s Paul Mescal) takes his daughter Sophie (newcomer Francesca Corio, so effortlessly cool she never seems to be acting) on a low-key holiday. Set sometime in the ’90s, they hang out in a budget Turkish resort, being easy-going, goofy and enjoying just the right amount of cheesy holiday fun (one hotel staff performance of the ‘Macarena’ will send shivers down the spine of anyone who’s had to behold it). Calum is caring, weird in the way that everyone’s dad is a bit weird, and a goofball who genuinely enjoys spending time with his kid. But there’s a clear sadness to him that Mescal allows to flicker through his face to remind us that no matter how hard Calum is trying, there’s a dark side to him that will soon rear its head. He promises Sophie things he cannot afford, and she calls him out on it. Then one night, unable to handle things, he disappears into the night, leaving Sophie stranded alone. Although he does come back, his guilt is overwhelming.Scottish filmmaker Charlotte Wells, who wrote and directs Aftersun, weaves together memories, home video and dreams in a singular way. It turns out that an older Sophie is remembering these important – and, it is implied, last – moments with her dad as an adult. Wells makes the interplay between these recollections and her piecing together her father’s emotional reality incredibly vivid. Aftersun flows like a fondly remembered memo

One Fine Morning

One Fine Morning

5 out of 5 stars

There is a difference between a small film and an intimate film. Mia Hansen-Løve’s (Eden) latest falls firmly in the latter category. It explores love, both romantic and familial, with no trace of drama or sappiness, and without ever feeling slight. It’s a balm of a film and another glorious showcase for the director’s light touch when dealing with complicated emotions.  Léa Seydoux plays Parisian single mum Sandra, a translator taking care of her daughter and her ageing father (veteran French actor Pascal Greggory), whose particular ailment has made him increasingly dependent on others. He’s a former philosophy professor, but we don’t get to know much more about him, except from Sandra and her mother’s memories of him and by gleaning clues from his extensive library.  Dealing with the devastating task of having to move him to a care facility (with the heartbreaking difficulty of finding a decent one within their means), Sandra moves through her life passively. She is mostly closed off to anyone beyond her family, until a chance encounter with an old friend, Clément (played by the dashing and floppy-haired Melvil Poupaud), sparks something that has been long dormant in her. He’s married with a son but their undeniable connection turns into an affair that reawakens Sandra to herself, her body and her desire for a connection that is her’s alone, and not borne out of duty.  Hansen-Løve explores love, both romantic and familial, with no trace of sappiness But their affair is mos

News (1)

Do worry darling: how the buzziest film of the year became a cautionary tale

Do worry darling: how the buzziest film of the year became a cautionary tale

I was worried going into Don’t Worry Darling.  The drama surrounding Olivia Wilde’s second movie as a filmmaker has turned it from one of the most anticipated fall releases to a TikTok laughing stock. Her hit debut, teen comedy Booksmart set up expectations soaring for next project. Don’t Worry Darling, a period thriller about the seemingly idyllic micro-society Victory Project, was subject of a bidding war and much hype. But the hype has turned sour. There’s the not-confirmed-but-totally-happening on-set romance between Wilde and her male lead, Harry Styles. There’s the alleged feud between Wilde and the film’s star, Florence Pugh. There’s the firing, or maybe quitting, or maybe something else, of Shia LaBeouf, who was once cast in Styles’s role. The film’s Venice Film Festival premiere was notable not for the glowing reviews (which were thin on the ground anyway), but for the forensic analysis of who refused to stand next to who on the red carpet, Pugh’s glaring absence from the press conference, Chris Pine’s astral projecting in front of the world press, and, of course, the fever dream that was Spitgate. The memes from the Don’t Worry Darling press tour will have us dining out for months. But what about the movie? Will all this melodrama help it sell tickets? Is there a way to watch it without trying to figure out if you can see the feuding happening on screen?  Photograph: Warner Bros.Art imitating life? Florence Pugh as the besieged Alice in ‘Don’t Worry Darling’ Aware

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