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Dave Calhoun

Dave Calhoun

Chief Content Officer, North America & UK

Dave Calhoun is Chief Content Officer for Time Out, North America & UK.

Articles (135)

The 100 best horror movies of all time

The 100 best horror movies of all time

Everyone is scared of something. It might be something specific, like spiders or snakes or heights, or something less tangible, like death or failure. But deep down, even the most posturing tough guy harbours deep-seated fears. Perhaps that explains why horror has grown into one of the most popular of all film genres. Even if a movie doesn’t necessarily touch on the things that personally scare us the most, allowing ourselves to be scared at all helps us confront and ease the anxieties and fears that keep us paralysed.   Of course, horror hasn’t always been a moneymaker. Not long ago, it was mainly a niche interest, ignored by mass audiences and shrugged off by critics. The recent artistic and commercial success of films like Get Out, A Quiet Place and Talk to Me have brought retroactive respect to a genre once synonymous with schlock. So if you’ve spent too much of your film fandom dismissing horror, consider this your guide to everything you’ve missed. Here are the 100 greatest horror movies ever made. Written by Tom Huddleston, Cath Clarke, Dave Calhoun, Nigel Floyd, Phil de Semlyen, David Ehrlich, Joshua Rothkopf, Nigel Floyd, Andy Kryza, Alim Kheraj and Matthew Singer Recommended: 🔪 The best new horror movies of 2024 (so far)🔥 The 100 best movies of all time👹 Cinema’s creepiest anthology horror movies🩸 The 15 scariest horror movies based on true stories

El TOP 5 de la cartellera de cinema

El TOP 5 de la cartellera de cinema

Si ja és difícil estar al dia de tot el que es pot fer a Barcelona, imagineu estar al dia de tot el cinema que es pot veure a la nostra cartellera! Per això en aquesta llista trobareu les nostres cinc pel·lícules favorites, algunes que s'estan a punt d'estrenar i també aquelles imperdibles que no podeu deixar escapar abans que desapareguin dels cinemes (i no us oblideu de consultar la llista de les estrenes del mes). NO T'HO PERDIS: Les 51 millors pel·lícules per veure en família

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

Comedy gets no respect, no respect at all. Actually, that’s not entirely true: everyone loves to laugh, and everyone has their favourite comedy movie to throw on when in need of a mood enhancer. But it’s also a genre frequently overlooked by cinema’s award-givers and canon gatekeepers – despite the fact that making a truly great, lasting comedy is one of the hardest achievements in film to pull off. It’s an artform largely dependent on context: what causes an audience to double over in hysterics in 2024 might be met with blank stares just a few years later, let alone a half-century.And so, those that have kept us cracking up for decades are truly special. To put together this list of the 100 greatest movie comedies ever, we asked comedians like Diane Morgan and Russell Howard, actors such as John Boyega and Jodie Whittaker and a small army of Time Out writers about the movies that make them chuckle the hardest, and for the longest amount of time. In doing so, we believe we’ve found the 100 finest, most durable and most broadly appreciable laughers in history. No matter your sense of humour – silly or sophisticated, light or dark, surreal or broad – you’ll find it represented here. Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time🥰 The greatest romantic comedies of all time🤯 33 great disaster movies😬 The best thriller films of all-time🌏 The best foreign films of all-time

The 101 best sex scenes in movies of all time

The 101 best sex scenes in movies of all time

Sex scenes are back! After a chaste period that had the internet wondering why cinema had lost its libido altogether, big-screen nookie has made a comeback. From Poor Things’ orgy of ‘furious jumping’ to Passages’ complex, elicit ménage à trois, to All of Us Strangers’ tender gay romance and Femme’s much less tender one, sex is everywhere you look – and it’s all to the good. Because while Jermaine Stewart wasn’t wrong when he sang that: ‘you don’t have to take your clothes off to have a good time’, some well-judged on-screen sex can definitely help a filmmaker tell their story – and ideally, not in a porn-y, lascivious, exploitative way. Because as a means of deepening a romance, building character, shocking and provoking an audience, there’s plenty to be said for kicking off the undies and getting down to it. But there’s a bigger story here, too, because the story of sex scenes is the story of cinema: a slow evolution from Hays Code-era censorship to a more open and honest view of human behaviour marked by sudden advances in what’s depicted – and more than a few regressive ones, too. The good, the bad and the ugly – looking at you, Last Tango in Paris – are all represented by the 101 entries below, a list that show how films’ steamier sides has shaken up the medium – and the world. Sorry Jermaine, but we’re taking cinema’s clothes off.  Written by Dave Calhoun, Joshua Rothkopf, Cath Clarke, David Ehrlich, Phil de Semlyen, Daniel Walber, Trevor Johnston, Andy Kryza, Daniel Wa

The 50 best gangster movies of all time

The 50 best gangster movies of all time

As far back as anyone can remember, cinemagoers have loved gangsters. It’s not hard to understand. Who hasn’t fantasised about living outside the law, of having money and influence, of being untouchable? In reality, life as a career criminal seems like a bum gig – always looking over your shoulder, never able to trust even your closest compatriots, and of course, all the immoral behaviour. But getting to live vicariously through the ones we see on screen is one of cinema’s purest thrills.  But not all movie gangsters are built the same. Some are loud and boisterous, others cold, calculating and unreadable. From fedora-sporting mobsters to pistol-packing yakuza enforcers, to street-level bosses whose empire only extends to the end of the block, cinema has seen them all and told their stories – and you’ll find all of them on our definitive list of the best gangster movies of all-time.  Recommended: 😬 The 100 best thriller movies of all-time💣 The 101 best action movies ever made🔪 The 31 best serial killer movies🕵️ 40 murder mysteries to test your sleuthing skills to the max

The 100 best British movies

The 100 best British movies

How exactly does one define British cinema? It’s more difficult to nail down than it seems. Okay, so the accents usually give it away. But the essential qualities of the best British movies are as wide-ranging as the Commonwealth itself. In terms of the stories it tells, it’s basically limitless. Want a widescreen epic? Go straight to the work of David Lean or Powell and Pressburger. In the market for a smaller, more personal drama? Try Joanna Hogg or Shane Meadows. Thrillers? Comedies? Period dramas? Movies about drugs? Movies that seem to be on drugs themselves? The UK film industry has produced them all, each displaying a distinctly English slant. In compiling this list of the best British movies of all-time, we surveyed a diverse array of actors, directors, writers, producers, critics and industry heavyweights, from Wes Anderson, Mike Leigh, Ken Loach, Sam Mendes and Terence Davies, David Morrissey, Sally Hawkins and Thandiwe Newton. Unsurprisingly, the results are as diverse as the country itself. Written by Dave Calhoun, Tom Huddleston, David Jenkins, Derek Adams, Geoff Andrew, Adam Lee Davies, Paul Fairclough, Wally Hammond, Alim Kheraj, Matthew Singer & Phil de Semlyen Recommended: 💂 50 great British actors🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time🎥 The 100 best movies of the 20th century so far🇬🇧 The 100 best London songs 

ギャング映画ベスト30

ギャング映画ベスト30

タイムアウト東京 > 映画 >ギャング映画ベスト30 映画の歴史が始まって以来、映画人は法の外で生きる人々に魅了されてきた。この世紀余りの間、ギャングの神話にはトンプソン・サブマシンガンを乱射するハードボイルドなマフィアから、拳銃さばきを芸術の域にまで高めたヤクザの殺し屋、スリーピーススーツを着た大物マフィア、ブロックの端までしか縄張りを持たないストリートレベルのボスまで、多くのキャラクターが登場してきた。 ギャングという職業はじつに多様で、それはギャング映画も同じだ。確かに派手で暴力的な作品も多いが、頭脳的なもの、物悲しいもの、氷のように冷たく静かなもの、ロマンティックなもの、コメディタッチのもの、気味の悪いものなど、さまざまだ。ここでは、タイムアウトワールドワイドが選ぶ歴代最高のギャング映画から30作品を紹介する。 では、我々とともに銀行に押し入り金庫の扉を開けてみよう。大丈夫。取り上げた作品の中では犯罪は割に合うのだから。 関連記事『ナイトアウトを思いきり楽しむ方法』『人生で観ておくべき、日本映画ベスト50』

Te invitamos a ver Indiana Jones y el Dial del Destino

Te invitamos a ver Indiana Jones y el Dial del Destino

La quinta película de Indiana Jones juega a lo seguro en territorio familiar y logra un impulso energético que se mantiene durante su larga duración, en parte sosteniendo momentos humanos más tranquilos al mínimo. Indiana Jones y el Dial del Destino nos muestra a Indiana (Harrison Ford) como un académico malhumorado y afligido a fines de los sesenta en Nueva York, lo que le permite al envejecido arqueólogo y aventurero rozarse brevemente con la modernidad de la carrera espacial y los jóvenes hippies. El director James Mangold y los escritores, incluidos los hermanos Butterworth, saben lo que realmente hace funcionar al viejo Indiana: nazis, trenes a toda velocidad, cuevas espeluznantes y serpientes aterradoras. Y aquí los tenemos todos, comenzando con un prólogo ambientado en Europa en los últimos días de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y continuando con un villano nazi con anteojos (Mads Mikkelsen) que sigue a Indiana de un período al siguiente. Ah, y el propio Arquímedes tiene un cameo. Hay ecos de historias pasadas y rostros familiares (para los fanáticos nostálgicos), pero la nueva en la escena es Helena (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), la ahijada de Indiana e hija de su compañero. Helena sabe lo que hace en lo que respecta a la misión de la película: recuperar una máquina que dobla el tiempo, la Antikythera, construida por el mismo barbudo Arquímedes. Pero Helena adopta un enfoque mercenario de la antigüedad. “Lo único en lo que vale la pena creer es en efectivo”. Teniendo en cuenta qu

The best animated movies of all time to add to your watch list

The best animated movies of all time to add to your watch list

Cartoons aren’t just for kids, of course. But for most kids, cartoons are where a love of movies often starts. No matter how highfalutin your taste in movies as an adult, chances are, your first cinematic obsession was an animation – whether it was a classic of Disney’s Golden Age or its ‘90s renaissance period, a Pixar heart-tugger or perhaps even a Studio Ghibli masterpiece. It’s a love most of us never never fully grow out of, either. Ask any parent about the joys of early child-rearing and they’ll undoubtedly tell you about showing their kids a cartoon they loved as a young’un. It’s a magical experience you get from few other forms of entertainment.   But the best animated movies don’t just appeal to kids, nor childhood nostalgia. They work on multiple levels, for broad audiences and age groups. In composing this list of the greatest animated movies ever made, we polled Time Out writers and experts including Fantastic Mr Fox’s Wes Anderson and Wallace and Gromit’s Nick Park, and the results run the gamut, from from those Disney, Pixar and Ghibli no-brainers to stop-motion nightmares, psychedelic headtrips, illustrated documentaries and bizarre experimental features that are decidedly for adults only. The movies on this list may make you feel like a kid again – but they may also blow your grown-up mind in ways you never expected.  Written by Trevor Johnston, David Ehrlich, Joshua Rothkoph, Tom Huddleston, Andy Kryza, Guy Lodge, Dave Calhoun, Keith Uhlich, Cath Clarke and M

The 12 most exciting films at this year’s Cannes Film Festival

The 12 most exciting films at this year’s Cannes Film Festival

Okay, so the rumours were wrong and this week’s Cannes Film Festival will have to manage without a new David Lynch film. But there’s still a tonne of attention-grabbing new movies premiering over the next fortnight, ranging from the flamboyant (Baz Luhrmann’s Elvis) to the intriguingly niche (Ethan Coen’s Jerry Lee Lewis doc).It all kicks off with a hoard of zombies, in Michel Hazanavicius’s B-movie homage Final Cut, and ends with a seriously topical immigrant drama set in Paris’s banlieues (Léonor Serraille’s Mother and Son). Here are 12 films on the programme to look out for.

Pedro Almodóvar nos cuenta sobre su nueva película, Madres Paralelas

Pedro Almodóvar nos cuenta sobre su nueva película, Madres Paralelas

Pedro Almodóvar está hablando por video desde su oficina en Madrid, su inconfundible mata de cabello blanco llena el marco de mi computadora portátil. A su derecha, hay un Bafta en un estante (ha ganado cuatro), junto al Oscar que ganó en 2002 por Hable con ella. Le pregunto qué hay en su escritorio. ¡Está lleno de cosas, de muchas cosas! Es optimista y se desliza entre el inglés y el español, a veces en la misma oración. Aquí hay algunos guiones. ¡Mi próxima película está aquí! Pero no sé si la haré. Si lo hago, será en inglés. Pero necesito saber que puedo hacerlo con las mismas condiciones de siempre, con absoluta libertad.Ahora con 72 años, el cineasta español ha estado haciendo las cosas a su manera desde que comenzó a hacer cortometrajes punk en 1970, en Madrid. El nuevo guión que está considerando (que será el primero en inglés) es nn manual para mujeres de la limpieza, y es probable que esté protagonizado por Cate Blanchett. Pero hoy hablamos de su nueva película Madres paralelas, la séptima que protagoniza Penélope Cruz. Como muchas de las películas de Almodóvar, desde Volver hasta Julieta, se trata de mujeres y maternidad, y es contemporánea, preocupada por cómo vivimos ahora y los extremos de la vida cotidiana.Cuenta la historia de dos mujeres, la fotógrafa Janis (Cruz) y la joven Ana (Milena Smit), cuyas vidas se cruzan cuando dan a luz en el mismo hospital, el mismo día. Su manejo magistral del destino y la gran emoción es tan esperado de Almodóvar como su vívido

Pedro Almodóvar vuelve a trabajar con Penélope Cruz, ahora en Madres Paralelas

Pedro Almodóvar vuelve a trabajar con Penélope Cruz, ahora en Madres Paralelas

⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑ Solo Pedro Almodóvar podría envolver un grito de dolor sobre la incapacidad de España para aceptar su reciente oscura historia en un melodrama de aspecto magnífico sobre dos madres arrastradas por el destino a una relación complicada, dolorosa, y en última instancia, enriquecedora. Janis (Penélope Cruz, en su séptima colaboración con el director de Todo sobre mi madre) es una elegante fotógrafa madrileña que contrata a un antropólogo forense, Arturo (Israel Elejalde), para ayudar a recuperar los restos de su bisabuelo en una fosa común en el pueblo de su familia. Esa búsqueda luego desaparece de nuestra vista por un tiempo, oculta pero aún inquietante, se podría decir, ya que Janis tiene una breve relación con Arturo, cuyo resultado es una niña. Es en la sala de maternidad (pintada de un verde precioso; esto no deja de ser una película de Almodóvar) donde conocemos a la adolescente Ana (Milena Smit), que también está dando a luz a una niña. A partir de ahí, las vidas de Janis y Ana se cruzan, con varios giros extremos y revelaciones del tipo que Almodóvar puede orquestar tan brillantemente, con las actuaciones, la música, el diseño y la fotografía trabajando en un exquisito paso a la par. Como siempre con las películas de Almodóvar, entrar en su mundo es un placer, incluso cuando enfrentamos dolor y lecciones difíciles. Cruz está excelente aquí como Janis, una mujer que intenta moldear la realidad en torno a sus propios deseos y sufre enormemente en el camino. Como si

Listings and reviews (426)

Tish

Tish

4 out of 5 stars

Proper recognition came too late for Tyneside-born photographer Tish Murtha, who died at 56 in 2013. As she was dying after suffering a brain aneurysm, her adult daughter Ella was on the phone to a UK government agency trying to persuade them not to sanction her mother for failing to show for a job centre appointment. It’s unmistakeable I, Daniel Blake territory, made even worse by the thought that an exceptional talent was being stifled by poverty and an unforgiving state. But that tragic note is only the postscript of this warm, conversational doc. Ella takes a tour of her late mother’s siblings and friends to discuss Murtha’s life and remarkable social-realist photo work – the latter of which takes centre stage on screen for us to discover or rediscover, like many have since Murtha’s death. It’s a remarkable and just posthumous revival of the artist’s work Work and life blurred for Murtha: she documented subjects close to her own experience, starting off photographing tough street kids like her brothers, two of whom appear as talking heads in the film. Murtha’s obvious talent led her to study photography in Wales and intermittent projects and commissions followed, especially during an especially fruitful period in the early and mid-1980s that coincided with the worst of Thatcher-era unemployment and discontent. But Murtha rarely made money from her work, and she spent her later years back in the North East, struggling to find support to continue working as a photographer.

Big Bad Me

Big Bad Me

3 out of 5 stars

This review is from 2017. The show returns to the Little Angel in 2023 under the new name ‘Big Bad Me’. This likeable new show at Islington’s backstreet puppet theatre the Little Angel offers a new spin on the classic fairytale. ‘Red Riding Hood and the Wolf’ gives us a young girl, Robyn (Charlotte Croft), who reimagines the story for us in the confines of her room one night before bedtime, using whatever’s at hand – toys, pillows, stuffed animals – to tell the tale while her offstage mother wishes that she would just go to sleep. In this version for ages six-plus, the wolf isn’t just dangerous, he’s misunderstood, and Jon Barton’s cheery rhyming verse invites us to see both sides of the story. Also, by setting the show entirely in a family home, Jimmy Grimes’s production reaches for a close connection with a young audience, inviting them into the closed world of imagination that is a child’s bedroom. Croft is an impressive performer, childlike enough to convince as a little girl, efficient with the verse and adept at bringing to life the props around her (I especially liked the pillow that became her grandma). How much kids will enjoy this version of Red Riding Hood depends partly on how much they’re willing to run along with the two-sides-to-every-story conceit. I worry a little that Barton’s spin removes some of the peril – and so some of the interest – from the story, but it also adds a new level of intrigue for adults accompanying their kids to the show, and you can’t

Black Flies

Black Flies

This New York-set intense drama about the lives, working and personal, of ambulance-speeding parademics lays its style on thick – so thick that reality eventually dies a death as ugly as some of the patients whose lives ebb away before our eyes. Ollie (Tye Sheridan) is a rookie from Colorado, all wide-eyed and idealistic in the big city. Gene (Sean Penn, grizzled, of course) is his old-dog partner, and he’s been through almost as many marriages as the number of flatliners he’s had in the back of the truck. French director Jean-Stephane Sauvaire (A Prayer Before Dawn) gives us an intoxicating tour of the seedier side of Brooklyn and various dying patients via woozy camerawork and a pile-up of grim incidents. But attempts to make sense of the private lives of Ollie and Gene are dogged with cliché and it’s hard to shake the sense that Sauvaire’s tour of the New York borough cynically piggybacks on the reality of poverty and crime. Black Flies has energy to spare but it’s tough to believe. Black Flies premiered at the Cannes Film Festival.

Fallen Leaves

Fallen Leaves

4 out of 5 stars

Can a film be both bleak and lovely at the same time? Finnish filmmaker Aki Kaurismäki (The Other Side of Hope, Drifting Clouds) takes a good stab at it with this black comic, repeatedly-stalled love story in which Helsinki again serves as a convincing shabby crucible of broken dreams. It’s a low-key treat with moments of real bliss. Our two leads look like they’ve had the life sucked out of them. Middle-aged Ansa (Alma Pöysti) stacks shelves in a supermarket but is sacked for taking home out-of-date food and distributing it to the poor. Long-faced Holappa (Jussi Vatanen) works as a metalworker and lives in a dormitory on the job, but he’s soon fired, too, in his case for knocking back moonshine at work. News of the Ukraine war plays on the radio (especially relevant news for Russia’s neighbour Finland, not even a member of NATO when this was shot) and the screws are tightening at every turn. It sounds miserable, but Kaurismäki finds moments of morose comedy everywhere, whether it’s the burly security guard at the supermarket (‘I was just following orders’) or the unlikely named grim dive bar, California Pub. It’s not all a downward spiral. There’s romance on the horizon when Ansa and Holappa meet in a karaoke club and enjoy a date at the cinema (to see Jim Jarmusch’s The Dead Don’t Die). But the horizon keeps shifting: Holappa loses Ansa’s phone number, only one of several mishaps to keep them them apart as soon as a relationship beckons. Aki Kaurismäki is the king of pared

May December

May December

4 out of 5 stars

A camp and curious pleasure from American filmmaker Todd Haynes (Carol, Far From Heaven), May December brings together Julianne Moore and Natalie Portman in the story of an actress, Elizabeth (Portman), who travels to Savannah, Georgia to spend time with a woman, Gracie (Moore), she’s going to be playing in a film. May December plays with the idea that everyone wants to be understood – to have their story told – but the examination and the telling might not have the results they desire. Gracie’s well-heeled, suburban, cake-baking life is being lived in the shadow of scandal. Two decades earlier, she was imprisoned for having sex with a 13-year-old, Joe, who she met working at a local pet shop. It was perfect tabloid and trash TV fodder. Now, two decades later, she and Joe (Charles Melton) are married, and it’s their apparently settled life to which Elizabeth becomes a witness, attending family events in her big movie-star sunglasses and travelling around town to talk with friends and family, including Gracie’s ex-husband and her kids from both marriages. It’s a fitting subject for Haynes who’s been interested in the dangers and dilemmas of bringing real lives to screen ever since he used Barbie dolls to make Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story in the 1980s. Remember, too, he’s the director who cast six actors – including Cate Blanchett – to play Bob Dylan in I’m Not There. He has form with breaking down what it means to tell a story in a way that’s vibrant rather than dry. I

Little Girl Blue

Little Girl Blue

4 out of 5 stars

This artful intimate French docudrama is a moving attempt by the filmmaker Mona Achache to better understand the life of her mother, the writer and photographer Carole Achache, who killed herself in 2016 aged 63.  But that summary feels blunt compared to the many ideas at play here to do with artistic and emotional inheritance. Little Girl Blue opens a small but revealing window on mid-century French literary culture and several towering figures within it, including the writers Jean Genet and Marguerite Duras, who crossed paths with three generations of creative women in Mona Achache’s family – and not always for the best. Little Girl Blue is also a bold play on non-fiction storytelling, returning time and again to Mona herself, surrounded by archive material – boxes, photos, letters – and in the company of the actor Marion Cotillard playing her mother. Cotillard’s contribution begins with a scene where she meets Mona in an apartment and takes off her clothes and puts on those belonging to Carole, Achache’s mother: jeans, cardigan, necklace and boots. Cotillard is illuminating in a family story dominated by women but darkened by men From there, we take a journey through the story of Mona’s grandmother, the publisher and writer Monique Lange, who in the 1950s and ’60s used to have Achache’s mother constantly at her side during a vibrant literary and intellectual life – leading to a horrific revelation about Genet abusing Carole as a child. Then we move through Carole’s adult l

About Dry Grasses

About Dry Grasses

4 out of 5 stars

Anyone familiar with the Turkish filmmaker Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Winter Sleep, Once Upon a Time in Anatolia) won’t be surprised to find that About Dry Grasses is a long-haul, knotty, talky examination of one man’s alienated relationship with the world around him. Equally unsurprising is how he’s self-regarding and brittle – the latest in a line of such Ceylan characters. Samet (Deniz Celiloglu) is an art teacher in the fourth year of a posting to a remote school on the snowy East Anatolian steppes. It’s far from anywhere, and especially from Istanbul, as Samet will tell anyone who listens, whether his housemate and fellow teacher, Kenan (Musab Ekici), whose village background invites condescension from Samet, or Nuray (Merve Dizdar), a teacher at another school. She wears a prosthetic leg after a terrorist attack, and her faith in community, as opposed to Samet’s weary individualism, inspires an arresting encounter between the two. The catalyst to much of what unfolds over the endlessly snowy months of this story is Semet’s relationship with a young pupil, 14-year-old Sevim (Ece Bagci), who’s he fond of, even giving her a gift when he returns from the school holidays. She likes him, too, in a childish way – a schoolgirl’s affection towards a friendly authority figure. It’s not a shock, then, when Semet is accused by the school of unprofessional conduct after an anonymous tip-off. He denies it, and the accusation is soon squashed by the local authorities, causing Semet to turn on

The Zone of Interest

The Zone of Interest

5 out of 5 stars

There’s a danger with stories drawn from the Holocaust that familiarity breeds complacency: we think we know what happened and we have a version in our heads that undemanding books, films and TV simply reinforce. British director Jonathan Glazer’s German-language The Zone of Interest, freely adapted from Martin Amis’s novel portraying the family life of Auschwitz’s commandant Rudolf Höss (Christian Friedel) and his wife Hedwig (Sandra Hüller) is nothing like that. It’s a bold, experimental take on the horror that inherits something of the waking nightmare of Glazer’s last two films, Under the Skin and Birth. It’s careful in deciding what it does and doesn’t show, and it seeks a way of addressing this story that honours the facts while not treading over old ground formally or dramatically. It’s provocative in a deeply intelligent way. Is a lovely garden still a lovely garden if it’s a stone’s throw from Auschwitz? Can you admire a flower, a piece of furniture, a well-cut lawn while also taking in the meaning of the smoking chimney on the horizon, the sound of gunshots in the distance and the relentless industrial burr of Mica Levi’s distressing score? The Zone of Interest runs with the nauseating truth that for Rudolf the extermination programme at Auschwitz was a fantastic career opportunity and for Hedwig it was a chance to live like ‘the Queen of Auschwitz’, as her husband jokes to a colleague. Our hindsight brings heavy historical knowledge to the sight of a smoking, fiery

Youth (Spring)

Youth (Spring)

4 out of 5 stars

You might struggle to shake the buzzing sound of industrial sewing machines after spending over three-and-a-half hours immersed in the world of this documentary from Wang Bing, the Chinese filmmaker known for his enquiring social and political films of epic length (this one’s a sprint compared to 2018’s eight-hour Dead Souls). For Youth (Spring) (the first part of an intended longer series), Wang filmed in Zhili City in Huzhou, Zhejiang province (about 100 miles from Shanghai) between 2014 and 2019. Zhili is an epicentre of kids clothes manufacturing sweatshops, a bubble of private enterprise that attracts tens of thousands of workers in their teens and twenties to live and work in terrible conditions in return for relatively attractive amounts of cash (wads, as we witness) but only if – and it’s a big if – they’re able to hit punishing piecework targets. Wang’s film feels less like an exposé than an eye-opener; a portrait of a reality that feels almost otherworldly in its distance and difference. His camera moves around various scrappy factory floors and the messy dormitories that sit above them, most of them on a street called Happiness Road, if ever there was a name to raise an eyebrow. Wang plunges us into the noise, dirt and daily interactions of this world with the kind of intimacy that can surely only be achieved by spending an enormous amount of time getting to know and winning the trust of your subjects. (There are only a few moments when anyone acknowledges the came

Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny

Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny

3 out of 5 stars

This latest, fifth Indiana Jones movie plays it safe by returning to familiar territory and achieving an energetic momentum that it mostly manages to maintain for its lengthy runtime, partly by keeping its quieter human moments to a strict minimum. Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny finds Indy (Harrison Ford) as a cranky and grieving academic in late 1960s New York – allowing the ageing archeologist-adventurer briefly to rub up against the modernity of the space race and youthful hippies. But the core team behind this last hurrah (surely the last?) for 80-year-old Ford (director James Mangold and writers including Britain’s Butterworth brothers) know what really makes old Indy tick: Nazis, speeding trains, spooky caves, scary snakes, Ancient World mumbo-jumbo and a sojourn to North Africa. And so we get them all – starting with a prologue set in Europe in the dying days of World War II and continuing with a bespectacled Nazi villain (Mads Mikkelsen) who follows Indy from one period to the next. Oh, and Archimedes himself has a cameo – but you’ll need to see the movie to unpick that one. There are echoes of past stories and familiar faces – catnip to nostaglic fans – but new to the scene is Helena (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), Indy’s goddaughter and daughter of Indy’s academic sidekick (Toby Jones, reliably fun) in the film’s opening wartime scenes. Helena knows her stuff when it comes to the film’s mission – to recover a time-bending machine, the Antikythera, built by beardy Arc

Indiana Jones i el dial del destí

Indiana Jones i el dial del destí

3 out of 5 stars

Aquesta darrera i cinquena pel·lícula d'Indiana Jones s'assegura el tret tornant a un territori familiar i sostenint l’impuls energètic durant les seves dues hores i mitja de metratge, en part deixant els moments més íntims al mínim estrictament necessari. 'Indiana Jones i el dial del destí' troba Indy (Harrison Ford) com un acadèmic irritable i afligit a la Nova York de finals dels anys 60, cosa que permet a l'envellit arqueòleg i aventurer enfrontar-se breument amb la modernitat de la carrera espacial i els joves hippies. Però el director James Mangold i l'equip de guionistes d'aquest últim hurra d’un Ford que té 80 anys saben què fa que el vell Indiana funcioni: nazis, trens a gran velocitat, coves esgarrifoses, serps espantoses, un poti-poti del món antic i una estada al nord d'Àfrica. Tenim de tot, començant amb un pròleg ambientat a Europa en els últims dies de la Segona Guerra Mundial i continuant amb un nazi amb ulleres (Mads Mikkelsen) que segueix Indiana. Ah, i el mateix Arquimedes té un cameo, però haureu de veure la pel·lícula. Hi ha ressons d'històries passades i cares conegudes (peixet per als aficionats nostàlgics), però la novetat és Helena (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), la fillola d'Indiana i filla del seu camarada acadèmic (Toby Jones, molt divertit). L'Helena sap el que fa en relació amb la missió de la pel·lícula: recuperar una màquina de doblegar el temps, l'Antikythera, construïda pel mateix barbut Arquimedes. Però té un enfocament mercenari pel que fa a l'anti

Monster

Monster

4 out of 5 stars

With this delicately-crafted quiet melodrama Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda (Shoplifters) takes us on a tricksy tour of a short period in the life of Minato (Kurokawa Soya), an 11-year-old school boy in an unnamed Japanese town. The film leans into the Oscar-nominated director’s recurring interest in families and kids, and does so via a script by Yuji Sakamoto (a rare example of Kore-eda not writing his own screenplay) which forever plays with perspective, lays false trails and circles the same events from other angles, regularly forcing us to question what we’ve already seen.  Even the title sets off a guessing game. Is the monster in question Minato’s teacher, Mr Hori (Nagayama Eita), who the boy accuses of bullying him, so setting off an internal process that shows up the cold, bureaucratic face of the school system when Minato’s mother, Saori (Sakura Ando), dares to challenge the institution? Is the monster the blank-faced, unsympathetic school headmistress (Tanaka Yuko), who is herself recovering from a tragedy in her personal life? And what are we to think of Minato’s classmate, Eri (Hinata Hiiragi), a dreamy boy, picked on by others and who Minato himself is accused of bullying – although, like many things in Monster, that’s maybe not to be taken entirely at face value. It's clear, too, that out of school the pair are friends, and they have constructed a world of make-believe in the forest near their town, where they meet and play in an abandoned old railway carr

News (32)

Ya hemos visto 'Indiana Jones y el dial del destino' y es la aventura que todo el mundo esperaba

Ya hemos visto 'Indiana Jones y el dial del destino' y es la aventura que todo el mundo esperaba

Esta última y quinta película de Indiana Jones se asegura el tiro regresando a un territorio familiar y sostiene el impulso durante sus dos horas y media de metraje, en parte dejando los momentos más íntimos al mínimo estrictamente necesario. 'Indiana Jones y el dial del destino' encuentra a Indy (Harrison Ford) como un académico irritable y afligido en la Nueva York de finales de los años 60, lo que permite al envejecido arqueólogo y aventurero enfrentarse brevemente con la modernidad de la carrera espacial y los jóvenes hippies. Pero el director James Mangold y el equipo de guionistas de este último hurra de un Ford que tiene 80 años saben qué hace que el viejo Indiana funcione: nazis, trenes a gran velocidad, cuevas escalofriantes, serpientes espantosas, un revoltijo del mundo antiguo y un viaje al norte de África. Tenemos de todo, empezando con un prólogo ambientado en la Europa de los últimos días de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y continuando con un nazi con gafas (Mads Mikkelsen) que sigue a Indiana. Ah, y el propio Arquímedes tiene un cameo, pero tendréis que ver la película. Hay ecos de historias pasadas y caras conocidas (para los aficionados nostálgicos), pero la novedad es Helena (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), la ahijada de Indiana e hija de su camarada académico (Toby Jones, muy divertido). Helena sabe lo que hace en relación con la misión de la película: recuperar una máquina de doblar el tiempo, Antikythera, construida por el barbudo Arquímedes. Pero tiene un enfoq

Ja hem vist 'Indiana Jones i el dial del destí' i és l'aventura que tothom esperava

Ja hem vist 'Indiana Jones i el dial del destí' i és l'aventura que tothom esperava

Aquesta darrera i cinquena pel·lícula d'Indiana Jones s'assegura el tret tornant a un territori familiar i sosté l’impuls durant les seves dues hores i mitja de metratge, en part deixant els moments més íntims al mínim estrictament necessari. 'Indiana Jones i el dial del destí' troba Indy (Harrison Ford) com un acadèmic irritable i afligit a la Nova York de finals dels anys 60, cosa que permet a l'envellit arqueòleg i aventurer enfrontar-se breument amb la modernitat de la carrera espacial i els joves hippies. Però el director James Mangold i l'equip de guionistes d'aquest últim hurra d’un Ford que té 80 anys saben què fa que el vell Indiana funcioni: nazis, trens a gran velocitat, coves esgarrifoses, serps espantoses, un poti-poti del món antic i una estada al nord d'Àfrica. Tenim de tot, començant amb un pròleg ambientat a Europa en els últims dies de la Segona Guerra Mundial i continuant amb un nazi amb ulleres (Mads Mikkelsen) que segueix Indiana. Ah, i el mateix Arquimedes té un cameo, però haureu de veure la pel·lícula. Hi ha ressons d'històries passades i cares conegudes (peixet per als aficionats nostàlgics), però la novetat és Helena (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), la fillola d'Indiana i filla del seu camarada acadèmic (Toby Jones, molt divertit). L'Helena sap el que fa en relació amb la missió de la pel·lícula: recuperar una màquina de doblegar el temps, l'Antikythera, construïda pel mateix barbut Arquimedes. Però té un enfocament mercenari pel que fa a l'antiguitat. "

I went to see the Queen lying in state and eight hours later I still don’t know why

I went to see the Queen lying in state and eight hours later I still don’t know why

It’s 5.30am on the Thursday before the Queen’s funeral, and I’m snaking along the sort of soul-sapping switchback queue you might see at Luton if every Ryanair passenger decided to take their summer trip at the exact same hour on the exact same day. A chirpy volunteer with a big plastic bag is taking banned snacks and drinks off queuers and redistributing them to the shivering crowd to gobble quickly before they enter Westminster Hall. Let no one throw peanuts at a Beefeater. ‘Oooh, suddenly I’m everyone’s friend,’ smiles the volunteer on snack-handout duty. ‘There’s a big bag of Haribo here. Anyone? Oh, it’s already open.’ Someone grabs it anyway and starts shoving wobbly sugar bits down their throat. On the grass here in Victoria Tower Gardens, there’s a woman sitting alone with her head in her hands, face sloping, eyes staring as if she’s just staggered out of Shangri-La at Glastonbury. The line of stinking Portaloos adds to the festival vibe. So do the fluorescent wristbands we’re all wearing. Another Queuer asks if she’s okay. She is, she’s just knackered. Her legs have given way and she’s having a breather. Photograph: Jess Hand In front of me in the queue are two jolly adult Scouts, a couple, complete with neckties and woggles. They seem to know half of the volunteers along the route, many of them fellow grown-up Scouts. ‘We must catch up.’ ‘Let’s see each other soon.’ The Queue is quickly becoming the air-kissing highlight of London’s Scouting social season. I don’t

Why Time Out is leaping into the Metaverse – and how to get involved

Why Time Out is leaping into the Metaverse – and how to get involved

At Time Out we love sharing cities with you – and we love shining a light on the most exciting experiences and communities within them. Which is why it feels natural for us to continue guiding you through the virtual experiences of the rapidly emerging Metaverse – and also to make our own first step into the Metaverse by launching a Time Out House in the new virtual community, Metropolis World, which you can access and explore yourself from today. Just as Time Out exists to unlock the best of great cities like London, New York, Sydney and Tokyo in the physical world, so we increasingly want to unlock the emerging communities and spaces of the virtual world – so that we all know what to embrace and avoid in this developing space which merges digital and physical experiences like nothing before it.  But what is the Metaverse? Fair question – hard and fast definitions are slippery and tough to pin down right now, which is why we have put together this handy cheat sheet that dives into some of the key questions and definitions. The author Matthew Ball has recently spent over 300 pages attempting to define it in his book The Metaverse and How It Will Revolutionize Everything. Ball sums up the Metaverse as: ‘a persistent and interconnected network of 3D virtual worlds that will eventually serve as the gateway to most online experiences, and also underpin much of the physical world.’ At Time Out, it’s a movement – often characterised as ‘the next Internet’ – that we want to join and

Five seriously unexpected moments in the brand-new Princess Diana doc

Five seriously unexpected moments in the brand-new Princess Diana doc

With Spencer and The Crown both tackling the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, the appetite of audiences for stories about her shows no sign of fading 25 years since her death. The latest of them, The Princess, just premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Made by British filmmaker Ed Perkins, it’s a documentary formed entirely of archive footage (ie: no interviews, no voiceovers). And there’s plenty of that to choose from, given that Diana was endlessly covered by the media from the moment her relationship with Prince Charles became public in 1980, where this film begins. The Princess retells her story from a new perspective by giving all these clips room to breathe, holding a chilling mirror to the strange effect Diana had on her country and the world beyond. Here are five of the film’s more eyebrow-raising scenes.  1. A newsreader casually mentions that the family of 19-year-old Diana has ‘vouched for her virginity’  The engagement of Diana Spencer, 19, and Prince Charles, 32, caused a media frenzy that never really stopped until her death in 1997. At one point in The Princess we hear a solemn newsreader explain how Diana was a good pick for the wife of a future king because of her innocence and her lack of previous sexual partners. The same newsreader then goes further, explaining that her family has ‘vouched for her virginity’. He might as well be talking about a prize cow.  2. A skinhead gets a Diana tattoo on the eve of her wedding  The Princess shows how Diana and Cha

A new film project invites us to embrace the uncertainty in our lives

A new film project invites us to embrace the uncertainty in our lives

Facing up to uncertainty and big decisions is a challenge that pretty much everyone has had to face on some level in the past 18 months. Where is this all heading? How much longer will this go on? Should I stay on the same path or take a leap into the unknown? IS THERE ANYBODY OUT THERE? Those sorts of questions underpin a unique new film and science project that’s emerged from London called The Uncertainty Experts (which Time Out is happy to be supporting as a media partner having been given a sneak preview of the project at pilot stage earlier this year). The Uncertainty Experts is an experimental film event, but it’s also a live science project designed in tandem with scientists at UCL to test and stretch each of our abilities to withstand uncertainty in our lives. If it has a mission, it’s to turn uncertainty into a positive rather than something which stops us sleeping well at night. The Uncertainty Experts will be screening online over three Tuesdays this November, and everyone taking part is expected to watch all three episodes and to get involved by taking part in digital surveys and virtual tasks. It’s a tough project to explain, but as someone who took part in the project’s pilot earlier this year along with 500 others, I can tell you that it’s a challenging and surprising experience. It’s in one way a bold live film event and, in others, it’s a community wellness project. It’s hectic and invigorating. It challenges you to ask some hard and rewarding questions about

‘The Crown’ Season 3 review: long may this royal soap opera reign

‘The Crown’ Season 3 review: long may this royal soap opera reign

Verdict: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The third series of ‘The Crown’ brings with it an almost wholesale change of cast and new problems to pile on old as we meet the British royal family in 1964. The challenges of the newly permissive 1960s are met almost entirely by a largely drunk Princess Margaret (an entertaining, if unfocused Helena Bonham Carter) dealing with her philandering husband Lord Snowdon (Ben Daniels). Elsewhere in the royal household it might as well be the 1860s when it comes to moral matters – not counting the high cut of the skirt worn by Princess Anne (a deliciously dry Erin Doherty). Prince Charles makes his first appearance in the series as an adult, with Josh O’Connor playing him as a gentle but haughty idiot, and he suffers the full weight of The Firm when his desire to marry Camilla Shand (Emerald Fennell) is well and truly nixed by the joint efforts of the Queen Mother (a near-silent performance by Marion Bailey) and Lord Mountbatten (Charles Dance, of course). Yet there is one very twentieth-century phenomenon lurking in this series: the midlife crisis. As Olivia Colman takes over from Claire Foy, her Queen is more settled and forthright, but also prone to paranoia and anxiety, especially when it comes to Cold War threats, and to the distraction of racehorses. Meanwhile, her husband, Prince Philip (Tobias Menzies), enters a full-on crisis of purpose, brilliantly expressed in an episode when Neil Armstrong and his fellow astronauts visit the Palace and the Queen’s cons

'Rogue One' : que vaut le premier spin-off de 'Star Wars' ?

'Rogue One' : que vaut le premier spin-off de 'Star Wars' ?

Des rebelles qui ont du cran, un méchant ricanant, quelques plaisirs nostalgiques et des troubles politiques : Gareth Edwards livre un prequel de ‘Star Wars’ agréable et grinçant. Ce nouvel épisode de ‘Star Wars’ – dont l’histoire se déroule peu de temps avant celle du tout premier de la saga, sorti en 1977 – ressemble à un conte d'action autonome et dynamique, mettant en scène un groupe de résistants au sein de l'Alliance rebelle. Cette bande de combattants enragés, dirigés par Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones, une héroïne complexe, pas toujours attachante ; ce qui est assez rafraîchissant), se regroupent pour mener une attaque contre l'Empire – dont le plus visible salopard est le militaire Orson Krennic (Ben Mendelsohn, tout en menace tranquille et huileuse). Frénétique, parfois irrévérencieux et un peu décousu, ‘Rogue One’ se plaît à rendre troubles les idées de bien et de mal, créant d’inattendues nuances de gris. En revanche, le film botte en touche les thèmes quasi-spirituels de la saga auxquels on pouvait pourtant s’attendre : ici, la Force n'est pas particulièrement présente, et les habiletés de combat à l’ancienne se révèlent plus importantes. Remonter dans le temps de la saga offre également une jolie possibilité de ressusciter, parfois, les plaisirs des films antérieurs – des bons vieux X-Wings à la présence d’un Dark Vador bien furax. Plus vous vous souviendrez du ‘Star Wars’ de 1977, plus l'histoire de ‘Rogue One’ prendra de sens. Dans le premier film, la princesse Leia

The real story behind ‘Rillington Place’

The real story behind ‘Rillington Place’

If, like us, you cowered behind the sofa watching Tim Roth and Samantha Morton in the BBC's new serial killer series ‘Rillington Place’ last night, prepare for the full, shocking story behind the drama. Warning - potential spoilers abound.   If you mention the name ‘John Christie’ to an older generation of Londoners, they’ll know exactly who you’re talking about. Christie was a serial killer hanged for his crimes in 1953. He’s now being played by Tim Roth in the new three-part drama series ‘Rillington Place’, with Samantha Morton playing his wife, Ethel. But what is the real story behind John Christie’s murders? Who was he? Why did he become notorious? And what happened to the real Rillington Place in west London? What did John Christie do? John Christie killed at least eight women between 1943 and 1953 in his flat at 10 Rillington Place in Ladbroke Grove, west London.         Where is the real Rillington Place? This Ladbroke Grove street was demolished in the late 1970s – after having been renamed Ruston Close in 1954 shortly after the murders were uncovered (at the request of residents). The site of 10 Rillington Place now sits roughly in the area of St Andrew’s Square, which is off Bartle Road. Who was Christie? Originally from a large family in Yorkshire, Christie served in World War One as an infantryman and was gassed – reportedly causing him to speak in a whisper for the rest of his life. He married Ethel in 1920 in Sheffield but they were separated between 1924 and 1

Why Netflix's new show ‘The Crown’ will change everything you think you know about the Queen

Why Netflix's new show ‘The Crown’ will change everything you think you know about the Queen

In November, Netflix will drop its most ambitious Originals series ever, ‘The Crown’ – the first season of a drama that'll tell the story of the entire reign of Queen Elizabeth II. Its creator and writer is Peter Morgan, who has previous with Her Maj – he wrote the movie ‘The Queen’ and the play ‘The Audience’, both starring Helen Mirren. We've had a sneak watch of all ten episodes, and can report that this is as good as it gets – exciting and smart drama. Claire Foy is terrific as young Elizabeth II, who we first meet in her twenties: her father, George VI (Jared Harris) is still king and she’s recently married Philip (Matt Smith). The first series examines how she copes with the responsibility of becoming Queen and explores the major relationships in her life: her husband; her first Prime Minister; her sister Princess Margaret; and her uncle, the former Edward VIII. It’s about power, duty, politics and tradition, and we’re hooked. Here are five things you need to know about The Crown 1. Claire Foy's performance will make you think twice about Queen Elizabeth II Claire Foy, 32, is best known for playing Anne Boleyn in the TV series ‘Wolf Hall’. ‘The Crown’ is going to make her a star. She’s flawless as the young Queen in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Minus the grey rinse, the young princess we meet is a privileged but sensible young woman, struggling with her own inadequacies (her lack of a proper education is a big theme). Foy – working with a genius script by Peter Morga

Why Netflix's new show "The Crown" will change everything you think you know about Queen Elizabeth II

Why Netflix's new show "The Crown" will change everything you think you know about Queen Elizabeth II

In November, Netflix will drop its most ambitious Originals series ever, The Crown – the first season of a drama that'll tell the story of the entire reign of Queen Elizabeth II. Its creator and writer is Peter Morgan, who has previous with Her Maj – he wrote the movie The Queen and the play The Audience’, both starring Helen Mirren. We've had a sneak watch of all ten episodes, and can report that this is as good as it gets – exciting and smart drama. Claire Foy is terrific as young Elizabeth II, who we first meet in her twenties: her father, George VI (Jared Harris) is still king and she’s recently married Philip (Matt Smith). The first series examines how she copes with the responsibility of becoming Queen and explores the major relationships in her life: her husband; her first Prime Minister; her sister Princess Margaret; and her uncle, the former Edward VIII. It’s about power, duty, politics and tradition, and we’re hooked. Here are five things you need to know about ‘The Crown’ 1. Claire Foy's performance will make you think twice about Queen Elizabeth II Claire Foy, 32, is best known for playing Anne Boleyn in the TV series ‘Wolf Hall’. ‘The Crown’ is going to make her a star. She’s flawless as the young Queen in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Minus the gray rinse, the young princess we meet is a privileged but sensible young woman, struggling with her own inadequacies (her lack of a proper education is a big theme). Foy – working with a genius script by Peter Morgan –

The actress playing the Queen in Netflix’s ‘The Crown’ thinks 'the royal family could be massively pissed off'

The actress playing the Queen in Netflix’s ‘The Crown’ thinks 'the royal family could be massively pissed off'

Claire Foy, who plays the Queen in ‘The Crown’, Netflix’s new ten-part drama series covering the early years of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, has revealed to Time Out that she doesn’t care very much what the real royal family thinks of the show. ‘They could be massively pissed off,’ Foy told us ahead of the series’s release this week. ‘But I’m not going to bump into the royal family in Covent Garden! I’d be more concerned if I could walk down the street and meet someone who could say: “You’re a fucking liar! I hated sitting there watching you!” That’s not going to happen.’ Set in the late 1940s and early 1950s, the first two series of ‘The Crown’ are said to have cost the streaming service £100 million. It’s Netflix’s biggest gamble to date. The first ten episodes cover just a few years and see Elizabeth marry Philip (Matt Smith) at 21, lose her father, King George VI (Jared Harris), at 25 and deal with several national crises and one veteran Prime Minister, Winston Churchill (John Lithgow), before the age of 30. If the first two series are successful, ‘The Crown’ could run and run, covering events up to the present day. Foy might not be worrying what the royal family thinks of ‘The Crown’ – but how would she vote if we had a referendum on the monarchy? ‘Oooo! Whether to keep them or get rid of them? Of course I’d want to keep them! That’s literally my heart just going, “No, don’t get rid of them, that’s not necessary at all. They’re lovely!” But I realise that’s not a vie