Get us in your inbox

Articles (93)

5 ways to experience nature and culture in Ise-Shima

5 ways to experience nature and culture in Ise-Shima

Craving some adventure away from the big city? If you’d rather slip into a wetsuit and go under the surface than hike a mountain or spend time on a farm, picturesque Ise-Shima in Mie prefecture makes the perfect destination. Home to Ise-Shima National Park, the area is famed for its natural beauty, maritime lifestyle and rich history – and with a fairly mild climate year-round, it’s a welcoming place to visit whatever the season. Located in central Japan, less than an hour and half by train from Nagoya, Ise-Shima is best known as the home of Ise Grand Shrine, an ancient sanctuary considered the holiest site in Shinto. Equally historic is the area’s diving culture, centred on ama women divers who gather shellfish and other treasures of the sea in shallow waters near the coast. Traditional life in Ise-Shima is best experienced together with a local guide, such as one from Kaito Yumin Club. Based in the city of Toba, in the northern part of the Shima Peninsula, this long-established tour operator offers a wealth of opportunities for visitors to participate in the area’s traditions and culture in sustainable ways. Read on for our picks of five essential experiences in Ise-Shima, from strolling through a fishing village and meeting the residents to going for a swim with hundreds of sea bream.

駐日ハンガリー大使に聞く、ハンガリーの都市活性化と人口減少解消への取り組み

駐日ハンガリー大使に聞く、ハンガリーの都市活性化と人口減少解消への取り組み

コロナ禍に課されてきた規制が世界中で撤廃されつつある今、コロナ終息後の東京の新しい方向性を示す斬新なアイデアやインスピレーションが求められている。 タイムアウト東京では2年間、「Tokyo meets the world」シリーズを通して東京在住の20人以上の駐日大使へインタビューを続け、文化、観光、都市生活に関する意見を紹介してきた。 今回は、日本に20年近く滞在しているハンガリーのパラノビチ・ノルバート駐日大使に話を聞いた。大阪の関西外国語大学へ留学生として来日した後、11年間名古屋に滞在し、2016年から現職に就いている。この経歴が、日本の多様性に対する洞察を深めてくれたと大使は言う。 インタビューの中で大使は、およそ20年間の滞在中に日本がどのように変化したかを語り、東京でハンガリーを味わうことができる場所も紹介してくれた。また、コロナ後に都市を活性化させたハンガリーの取り組みから日本が学べる点や、日本にとって喫緊の課題である人口減少を解消するためのハンガリー政府の取り組みが、着実に実を結びつつあることについても紹介した。 関連記事『Tokyo meets the world』

Tokyo meets the world: Hungary

Tokyo meets the world: Hungary

As the pandemic recedes and the search for a new, post-Covid style of urban life begins in earnest, many Tokyoites are hungry for the kind of fresh ideas and inspiration needed to plot a new direction for the capital in the years to come. Over the past few years, we’ve sought to highlight a wide range of innovative views on culture and city life through Tokyo meets the world, a series of interviews with more than two dozen ambassadors to Japan who call Tokyo home. For our latest conversation in the series, we caught up with Norbert Palanovics, ambassador of Hungary, who has lived in Japan for nearly two decades. Having first arrived in the country as an exchange student at Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Palanovics resided in Nagoya for 11 years and has held his current position since 2016 – a background that provides him with deep insight into Japan’s diversity. For Tokyo meets the world, the ambassador shared his thoughts on how the country has changed during his stay and revealed where to get a taste of Hungary in Tokyo. He also highlighted what Japan might learn from Hungary’s efforts to re-energise cities in the wake of the pandemic, and how the Hungarian government’s efforts to reverse population decline – another pressing issue for Japan – are bearing fruit.

Dutch documentary about autism and old age headlines EU Film Days 2023

Dutch documentary about autism and old age headlines EU Film Days 2023

Photo: Courtesy of The Dutch Embassy in Tokyo'A Place Like Home' This year’s edition of the annual EU Film Days, a celebration of European cinema that brings together films from across the continent and is presented by embassies and cultural organisations of European Union member states in Japan, kicked off on June 2. Among the programme’s highlights is ‘A Place Like Home’, documentary entry from the Netherlands that follows the life of Kees Momma, a 57-year-old autistic man. Screened in Japan for the first time, the film examines the often funny and sometimes heart-wrenching process through which Kees seeks to become independent and move out of his parents’ house. Set for screenings at four venues in Tokyo, Kyoto, Fukuoka and Hiroshima respectively, the documentary will be shown at the National Film Archive in Kyobashi on June 22. On the same day, the NFA will also be showing ‘Only the best for our son’ (2014), another documentary about Momma by the same team, in which the protagonist’s aging parents are depicted caring for their son and worrying about his future. That film has been seen by more than three million people in the Netherlands and won the 5 years 2Doc prize, the country’s most prestigious award for documentary filmmaking. We caught up with Monique Nolte, director of both ‘A Place Like Home’ and ‘Only the best for our son’, and Kees Momma himself to talk about their work, the challenges faced by those with autism later in life, and how their insights and experie

駐日タイ王国大使が語る、東京で本場のタイカルチャーを満喫する方法

駐日タイ王国大使が語る、東京で本場のタイカルチャーを満喫する方法

コロナ禍の終わりを見据え、世界中で規制が撤廃されてきた今、コロナ終息後の東京の新しい方向性を示す斬新なアイデアやインスピレーションが求められている。 タイムアウト東京は「Tokyo meets the world」シリーズを通して、東京在住のさまざまな国の駐日大使へのインタビューを続け、都市生活に関する幅広い異なる視点を紹介。とりわけ環境に優しく、幸せで安全な未来へと導くための持続可能な取り組みについては大きく取り上げてきた。 今回は、日本の高校、大学、大学院に通い、累計で20年以上この国で暮らしているタイ王国のシントン・ラーピセートパン大使に話を聞いた。同大使は1970年代後半から80年代にかけて東京と横浜で学び、2019年の大使就任までに2度、東京で外交官として働いた経験があり、首都圏に精通した知識と視野の広さをを持つ。今回のインタビューでは、東京の桜と紅葉の名所、本格的なタイの味を探すコツ、ムエタイのジムなど東京でタイ文化を体験するためのポイントや、昭和から令和にかけての日本社会の変化、タイの経済哲学について語ってくれた。 関連記事『Tokyo meets the world』

Tokyo meets the world: Thailand

Tokyo meets the world: Thailand

As the pandemic recedes and the search for a new, post-Covid style of urban life begins in earnest, many Tokyoites are hungry for the kind of fresh ideas and inspiration needed to plot a new direction for the capital in the years to come. With Tokyo meets the world, our ongoing series of interviews with ambassadors to Japan who call Tokyo home, we’ve sought to highlight a wide range of innovative views on culture, travel and city life, from sustainability and ecological initiatives to diversity and inclusiveness. For this edition of the series, we chatted with Singtong Lapisatepun, ambassador of Thailand, who received his education in Japan and has lived here for a total of more than two decades. Having studied in Tokyo and Yokohama from the late 1970s through the ’80s and worked in Tokyo as a diplomat twice before assuming the ambassadorship in 2019, he possesses both a rare breadth of perspective and an intimate familiarity with the capital area. During our discussion, Lapisatepun kindly shared his picks of the best Tokyo spots for cherry blossoms and the autumn foliage, let us in on what to look for when hunting for authentic Thai flavours, and gave a few pointers on how to experience Thai culture in Tokyo – from cooking classes to Muay Thai sparring.

駐日ポルトガル大使が語る、持続可能な海洋管理の重要性と500年におよぶ日葡関係

駐日ポルトガル大使が語る、持続可能な海洋管理の重要性と500年におよぶ日葡関係

コロナ禍の終わりを見据え、世界中で規制が撤廃されてきた今、コロナ終息後の東京の新しい方向性を示す斬新なアイデアやインスピレーションが求められている。 タイムアウト東京は「Tokyo meets the world」シリーズを通して、東京在住の駐日大使へのインタビューを続け、都市生活に関する幅広い異なる視点を紹介。とりわけ環境に優しく、幸せで安全な未来へと導くための持続可能な取り組みについては大きく取り上げてきた。 今回の「Tokyo meets the world」では、2022年3月に就任したばかりのポルトガルのヴィットル・セレーノ大使に話を聞いた。ポルトガルは、カステラやサッカーのク リスティアーノ・ロナウドで知られる、南欧の国であり、2025年に大阪にやってくる「タイムアウトマーケット」の発祥の地でもある。環境に配慮した先進的で競争 力のある経済国家であり、日本との間にある古くからの絆を誇りに思っていることをアピールするため、南欧諸国の大使の中でも最年少の一人、セレーノ大使は精力的に活動している。 プライベートでは、愛車の「ドゥカティ」にまたがり東京の街を走るのが好きだという。そんなセレーノ大使に、日本とポルトガルの関係、海洋を守るために両国が協力できること、おすすめのポルトガル料理店などについて聞いた。

Tokyo meets the world: Portugal

Tokyo meets the world: Portugal

As the pandemic recedes and the search for a new, post-Covid style of urban life begins in earnest, many Tokyoites are hungry for the kind of fresh ideas and inspiration needed to plot a new direction for the capital in the years to come. With Tokyo meets the world, our ongoing series of interviews with ambassadors to Japan who call Tokyo home, we’ve sought to highlight a wide range of innovative views on culture, travel and city life, from sustainability and ecological initiatives to diversity and inclusiveness. For this edition we caught up with Vítor Sereno, ambassador of Portugal, who is still getting settled in Tokyo after assuming his post in spring. One of the southern European nation’s youngest envoys here ever, the enthusiastic Sereno is eager to promote his country – best known on these shores for castella cakes and Cristiano Ronaldo – as a forward-looking and competitive economy with a concern for the environment and proud of its deep and time-honoured ties to Japan. While pouring his professional energy into that effort, the ambassador is also finding time to explore the capital, including on the back of his Ducati motorcycle. Read on for Sereno’s views on the Portugal-Japan relationship, including how the two countries can work together to save the oceans, plus a few can’t-go-wrong restaurant and café recommendations. Portugal is also the birthplace of Time Out Market, which is coming to Osaka in 2025. Read more about Time Out Market Osaka here.

Tokyo meets the world: Latvia

Tokyo meets the world: Latvia

As the pandemic recedes and the search for a new, post-Covid style of urban life begins in earnest, many Tokyoites are hungry for the kind of fresh ideas and inspiration needed to plot a new direction for the capital in the years to come. With Tokyo meets the world, our ongoing series of interviews with ambassadors to Japan who call Tokyo home, we’ve sought to highlight a wide range of innovative views on culture, travel and city life, from sustainability and ecological initiatives to diversity and inclusiveness. Environmental progress and gender equality alike are close to the heart for Latvia’s Dace Treija-Masī, ambassador of one of the greenest countries in Europe, which also has an enviable record in promoting women’s empowerment. Though Japan’s efforts in these areas aren’t always held in high regard internationally, Treija-Masī, who is set to leave Tokyo at the end of June after representing her country here since 2017, says she has noticed clear steps forward. For this latest installment of Tokyo meets the world, the ambassador took time to speak about the many facets of sustainability, all while sharing her thoughts on how Tokyo has changed since the mid-’90s and revealing how to get a taste of Latvian cuisine and culture in the capital.

駐日ラトビア大使に聞く、SDGsへの取り組みや東京でラトビア料理と文化を知る方法

駐日ラトビア大使に聞く、SDGsへの取り組みや東京でラトビア料理と文化を知る方法

コロナ禍の終わりが見え、世界中で規制が撤廃されてきた今、コロナ終息後の東京の新しい方向性を示す斬新なアイデアやインスピレーションが求められている。 タイムアウト東京は『Tokyo meets the world』シリーズを通して、東京在住の駐日大使へのインタビューを続け、都市生活に関する幅広い革新的な意見を紹介。とりわけ、環境に優しく、幸せで安全な未来へと導くための持続可能な取り組みについては大きく取り上げてきた。 ヨーロッパで最も環境に優しい国の一つであるラトビア共和国のダツェ・トレイヤ=マスィー大使は環境保護と男女平等を重要視しており、女性の地位向上を推進していることでも知られる。 日本のこうした分野における取り組みは国際的に評価されているとは言いがたいが、トレイヤ=マスィー大使は、2017年に就任して以来、明らかな前進を実感しているという。大使はこのほかにも、サステナビリティに関するさまざまな側面について話すとともに、初来日した90年代半ば以降の東京の変化や、東京でラトビア料理や文化を味わう方法について語ってくれた。

Tokyo meets the world: Tunisia

Tokyo meets the world: Tunisia

As the pandemic recedes and the search for a new, post-Covid style of urban life begins in earnest, many Tokyoites are hungry for the kind of fresh ideas and inspiration needed to plot a new direction for the capital in the years to come. With Tokyo meets the world, our ongoing series of interviews with ambassadors to Japan who call Tokyo home, we’ve sought to highlight a wide range of innovative views on culture, travel and city life, from sustainability and ecological initiatives to diversity and inclusiveness. For this edition we visited with Mohamed Elloumi, ambassador of Tunisia, whose more than eight years in Tokyo – first as an embassy councillor and since summer 2018 as ambassador – have given him an extensive perspective on the city and Japan as a whole. Over a serving of punchy coffee and delicious ‘judge’s ears’ – a Tunisian pastry made of thin, honey-coated strips of dough and traditionally eaten during the holy month of Ramadan – Elloumi listed his favourite Tokyo spots and revealed where to find Tunisian flavours in the capital, plus gave us a comprehensive introduction to Japan-Tunisia relations and shared one particularly joyful moment for his country during last year’s remarkable Olympics.

駐日チュニジア大使に聞く、東京で楽しむチュニジアフードと日本との多層的な関係

駐日チュニジア大使に聞く、東京で楽しむチュニジアフードと日本との多層的な関係

コロナ禍の終わりが見え、世界中で規制が撤廃されてきた今、コロナ終息後の東京の新しい方向性を示す斬新なアイデアやインスピレーションが求められている。 タイムアウト東京は『Tokyo meets the world』シリーズを通して、東京在住の駐日大使へのインタビューを続け、都市生活に関する幅広い革新的な意見を紹介。とりわけ、環境に優しく、幸せで安全な未来へと導くための持続可能な取り組みについては大きく取り上げてきた。 今回は、チュニジアのモハメッド・エルーミ大使に話を聞いた。大使館の参事官として来日し、2018年夏からは駐日大使に就任。合わせて8年以上東京に滞在しているエルーミ大使は、東京と日本全体について幅広い視点を持つ。 パンチのきいたコーヒーとおいしいチュニジアの伝統菓子を振る舞いながら、彼は東京のお気に入りスポットやチュニジアの食が味わえる店を紹介。さらに日本とチュニジアの関係を幅広く伝え、『東京2020オリンピック・パラリンピック』で記憶に残った瞬間も話してくれた。

News (18)

タイムアウトニューヨークの記者による東北探索の連載がスタート

タイムアウトニューヨークの記者による東北探索の連載がスタート

今年で、3.11の東日本大震災から5年という長い年月が過ぎたことになる。震災は、東北地方沿岸を広範囲にわたり徹底的に破壊し、東京を含めた東日本全域で人々の生活を突如として不安定なものにした。復興への道は長く険しいが、被災地は着実に立ち直りつつあり、旅行者もまた、自然が美しく歴史のある、美味しい食べ物も豊かなこの地域に徐々に戻りつつある。 今年の1月、福島県、宮城県、岩手県の現在の状況をレポートするために、タイムアウトニューヨークの同僚とともに東北へ向かった。復興過程を調査するだけでなく、今の東北地方ですべきこと、見るべきこと、体験すべきことなどを知りたかったからだ。この4週間にわたる旅の様子は、タイムアウトニューヨークのウェブサイト、紙面、タイムアウト東京の日英サイトで連載中だ。 NHKワールドと共同で制作した東北地方シリーズの記事は、3月10日(木)から12日(土)までニューヨークのグランドセントラル駅で開催される『ニューヨークジャパンウィーク』ともタイミングを合わせている。ビッグアップルに立ち寄ることがあれば、チェックしてほしい。   『Following the samurai in western Fukushima』の原文はこちら 東北探索 第1回『武士の歴史を追って 福島県西部』はこちら

この夏、行くべきナイトミュージアム6選

この夏、行くべきナイトミュージアム6選

In association with Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture 美術館を訪れる時間がなかなか作れないという読者も多いのではないだろうか。大抵の美術館は平日は18時前に閉館するので、仕事帰りにアート鑑賞するのは困難だ。一方で、週末には展示を見る人たちで混み合っている。そんな事情もあり、美術館に行くことが億劫(おっくう)になっていたアート好きに朗報がある。今年の夏は、都立や国立の美術館6館で「サマーナイトミュージアム」が開催される。期間は、2017年7月20日(木)から8月26日(土)まで。 サマーナイトミュージアムに参加する美術館や博物館は少なくとも週1日、2日は21時まで開館する。この夏はバーに行く前に展覧会に立ち寄ったり、帰宅ラッシュを避け、夜の涼しい美術館や博物館でアート鑑賞をゆっくりと楽しむのもいいだろう。 ©東京都江戸東京博物館 期間中には、トークショーやミニコンサートなども実施される。東京都美術館、江戸東京博物館のカフェ、レストランでは17時30分から、東京都写真美術館では18時から、それぞれ展覧会チケットを提示すると飲食代が割引になるサービスも。東京国立近代美術館では、夏限定ガーデンビアバーも登場する。 各美術館の夜間開館時間と詳細は以下。いずれも入館は閉館の30分前まで。なお、小金井市にある江戸東京たてもの園でも夜間特別開園が実施されるが、2017年8月5日(土)と6日(日)は20時30分まで開園する。サマーナイトミュージアムの詳細は東京都歴史文化財団公式ウェブサイトで確認してほしい。 サマーナイトミュージアム開館時間・開催イベント 1.東京都美術館 2017年7月21日(金)〜8月25日(金)金曜のみ21時00分まで開館 2017年7月28日(金)〜8月25日(金)金曜のみ17時30分以降は『杉戸洋 とんぼ と のりしろ展』は学生無料。一般の観覧料は割引。 2017年7月28日(金)18時00分〜/19時00分〜 企画棟ホワイエにて無料ミニコンサート(企画制作・東京文化会館) 2017年8月11日(金・祝)17時30分〜/18時30分〜 「ヘブンアーティスト」による屋外でのチェロ演奏 2.東京都写真美術館 2017年7月20日(木)〜8月25日(金)木・金曜のみ21時00分まで開館 ※金曜18時00分以降は学生無料、一般、65歳以上の観覧料は割引。(『世界報道写真展2017』を除く) 2017年8月25日(金)18時00分〜 無料ミニコンサート(企画制作・東京芸術劇場) 3.東京都江戸東京博物館 2017年7月21日(金)〜8月25日(金)金曜のみ21時00分まで開館 ※金曜17時30分以降は常設展の観覧料が学生無料、一般、65歳以上の観覧料は割引 2017年7月28日(金)15時00分〜21時00分 ※2017年NHK大河ドラマ『おんな城主直虎』特別展『戦国!井伊直虎から直政へ』当日券100円割引 毎週金曜18時30分〜 えどはく寄席(45分間)   4.東京国立近代美術館       2017年7月21日(金)〜8月26日(土)金・土のみ21時00分まで開館 ※企画展『日本の家 1945年以降の建築と暮らし』は、17時以降一般200円割引、学生は100円割引。金・土曜は所蔵作品展『MOMATコレクション』は17時以降一般200円割引、学生は8月のみ無料 2017年7月28日(金)~8月26日(土)金・土曜夜のみ夏限定ガーデンビアバーが芝生

Six Tokyo museums to visit at night this summer

Six Tokyo museums to visit at night this summer

In association with Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture Having trouble finding time for Tokyo’s museums? We’ve all been there: most of them close before 6pm on weekdays, making post-work art appreciation impossible, while going on a weekend usually means elbowing your way through a sea of humanity just to get a glimpse of the exhibits. But there’s hope on the horizon: this summer, six national and city-run museums in the capital are teaming up for Night Museum, an extravaganza of events and extended opening hours running from July 20 to August 26. During said period, all participating institutions will stay open until 9pm on at least one day of the week, with most extending their hours on two days weekly. And that, in turn, opens up all kinds of exciting possibilities: how about taking in an exhibition before hitting the bars, or avoiding the evening rush hour by admiring art long past sunset? However you choose to take advantage of the longer hours, there’s plenty to look forward to: in addition to the events listed below, the programme includes a slew of gallery talks and lectures (all in Japanese, natch), plus discounts for exhibition ticket-holders at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and Edo-Tokyo Museum’s cafés and restaurants after 5.30pm. You can also save money on drinks at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum, which offers similar discounts after 6pm, and sip on a cold one at the National Museum of Modern Art, where beer, wine and snacks can be enjoy

北欧の味は六本木で。フィンランドレストランが期間限定オープン

北欧の味は六本木で。フィンランドレストランが期間限定オープン

2017年3月1日(水)にフィンランドレストランがオープン。さっそくタイムアウト東京のフィンランド人エディターが行ってきたので、彼の感想をレポートする。 ムーミンカフェや輸入もののドーナツショップ、その他様々なポップアップショップはあるが、本物のフィンランドレストランはない。つい最近まで、東京でフィンランドの味を楽しみたいと思ってもそれは叶わなかった(おかげで今日までスリムなままでいられたわけだが)。しかし、北欧諸国最東端であるフィンランドのデザイン、ファッション、さらには音楽(ほぼメタルを意味する)さえも、過去10年の間に日本国内のその界隈ではかなりの人気を博しているので、グルメの世界でも同じように人気が上昇しても不思議ではない。 先陣を切るのは、2017年3月1日(水)に六本木ヒルズでオープンし、2018年1月末まで限定で(これはフィンランドの独立100周年記念日と一致する)フィンランド料理を提供する、落ち着いた雰囲気のとても素晴らしいレストラン、フィンランドキッチン タロだ。メトロハットの地下2階に入居するタロ(フィンランド語で家の意味)は、北欧諸国について広く知ってもらうことを目指している。例えば、使用している食器は『イッタラ』と『アラビア』のものだったり、家具はミニマルなデザインのものだったりする。店内は樺の木の枝で装飾されており、隣接する居酒屋と寿司屋の賑やかさといい意味で鮮やかなコントラストをなしている。   なにかとフィンランド産のものが多い店内だが、やりすぎといった印象は受けない。ムーミンの存在感は最小限に抑えられ、提供されるメニューはフィンランドの大使館の公式シェフ、エレナ・エダが監修した。エダが考案した『ビーツソース添えのローストポーク』や、心のこもった豆のスープ(木曜のみ)、そして『マカロニキャセロール』は、常駐シェフの松本勲の手に任されており、彼自身のオリジナルメニューもまた何種類か提供される。筆者は特に『ラピンクルタ』のビールを使った、香り豊かで家庭的な風味のビーフシチューが気に入った。   ドリンクメニューも面白く、輸入醸造として注目を集めるフィンランドのウォッカを効かせたカクテルなどを中心に、スカンジナビアの紅茶、フィンランドの大手コーヒー業者であるロバートコーヒーのサイフォンコーヒーなどがある。値段は850円とコーヒーとしては少し厳しい値段のように聞こえるかもしれないが、一口飲めば許容範囲と思ってしまうだろう。コーヒーはポットでサーブされ、たっぷり2カップ分以上は入っている。 デザート好きのことももちろん忘れてない。注目すべきは、創業160年になるヘルシンキのベーカリー、エクベリ直伝のとびきり美味しいベリーのタルトと、アイスクリームとフィンランドのベリーを添えた、シンプルでフワフワなオーブン焼きのパンケーキの2つだ。紹介したアラカルト料理とドリンクはすべて14時30分から注文可能、ラストオーダーは毎日22時となっている。一方、11時からのランチタイムでは、選べる3つのコースがあり、メインやサイドを組み合わせることができる。 タロは明らかにフィンランドの観光局にとって便利なPR手段で、レストランの見た目と雰囲気を可能な限り「本物」にするために、年予算のかなりの部分を使ったに違いない。しかし、現時点でこの街で最高のフィンランドの食べ物を提供し、非常にリーズナブルな価格で楽しめるという事実は揺るぎようがない。東京にあるミャンマー、ウズベキスタン、ベラルーシのレストランに行ったことがある人は書き留めてほしい。「東京

Savour the flavours of the cold north at Finland Kitchen Talo

Savour the flavours of the cold north at Finland Kitchen Talo

Moomin cafés, import doughnut shops and multifarious pop-ups, yes, but no real restaurants – until very recently, the pickings have indeed been slim for those looking to sample the flavours of Finland in Tokyo. But with design, fashion and even music (read: metal) from that easternmost of Nordic nations winning considerable popularity on these shores over the past decade, it’s no surprise that the gourmet side of things appears to be improving as well. Leading the way is this modest but very competent eatery, opened at Roppongi Hills on March 1 and set to serve a diverse menu of Finnish cuisine until the end of January 2018 – a period that coincides with Finland’s celebrations of its 100th birthday as an independent country. Tucked away on the second basement floor of the Metro Hat, Talo (‘house’) aims for a comprehensively Nordic experience – think Iittala and Arabia tableware, minimalist furniture and branches of birch trees decorating the premises – that makes for an almost laughably acute contrast with the neighbouring izakayas and sushi joints.   But it manages to stay well out of kitsch territory: Moomin characters are kept to a minimum, and the menu is curated by Elena Ada, the Finnish embassy’s official chef. Her recipes for dishes like roast pork with beet sauce, hearty pea soup (available only on Thursdays) and macaroni casserole are then put into practice by resident chef Isao Matsumoto, who also contributes a few of his own creations. We’re especially fond of the

Riding Tokyo taxis just got cheaper – but only if you aren’t going far

Riding Tokyo taxis just got cheaper – but only if you aren’t going far

Think travelling by taxi in the capital is too expensive? Well, the prices have just gone down significantly – assuming you’re only choosing cabs for quick rides around the city centre. Beginning today (January 30), the initial fare within the 23 wards (plus Mitaka and Musashino cities) has been lowered from ¥730 to ¥410. Quite the discount, huh? Well, of course there’s a catch: this rate only applies to the first 1.052 km, whereas the old starter fare covered 2km. Once the roughly 1km limit has been reached, the meter in your cab will start ticking up by ¥80 every 237m (or every 90 seconds when you’re moving at 10km/h or slower). That adds up to lower fares for anyone travelling 2km or shorter, while those riding 6.5km or longer can expect to pay more than before. Journeys in between those thresholds will cost roughly the same as previously. Touted as a change meant to encourage more frequent taxi rides (read: get all those cheapskate tourists to jump in), the revision is unlikely to please Tokyoites who rely on cabs to get home after missing their last train or getting so utterly wasted as to make a journey on public transport unfeasible. They really couldn’t wait for spring before all this fare-fiddling, could they? New in town? Find out how to catch a cab in Tokyo

Michelin Guide 2017 in 3 minutes

Michelin Guide 2017 in 3 minutes

December is almost here, and with it the commotion that always surrounds the unveiling of the Michelin Guide. Published annually since 2008, the gourmet bible's Tokyo edition has rightfully ranked our dear city as the food capital of the world every year from 2009 onwards, so it's hardly news that Tokyo still stands high above the competition in 2017. Unveiled on November 29, the latest version of Michelin Tokyo lists 12 three-star restaurants – two more than the 10 found in Paris – 54 two-star joints (up from 51 last year) and 161 one-star places (153 in 2016), giving Tokyo a total of 227 starred restaurants. That's far more than double the number of closest challengers Kyoto (96) and Paris (92). However, the gap between Paris and Tokyo at the very top is closing at an alarming rate: Tokyo again dropped one three-star, and the heady heights of 17 back in 2012 are looking more and more like an anomaly. The unlucky loser was Aoyama's Esaki, which for some reason fell to two stars – while the likes of Sukiyabashi Jiro and Kanda maintained top marks despite predictions to the contrary.  Although the three-star list appears to be turning into a victim of conservatism and comfort, Michelin Tokyo 2017 is admittedly packed with interesting details in the less flashy categories. For one, Sugamo's Tsuta was joined by Minami-Otsuka shop Nakiryu in the hallowed hall of Michelin-starred ramen, with the innovative tantanmen specialist blindsiding most of the capital's eager slurpers (incl

The 100 best Tokyo restaurants – here comes our drool-inducing autumn issue

The 100 best Tokyo restaurants – here comes our drool-inducing autumn issue

  Art direction and food design: Steve Nakamura. Photography: Naohiro Tsukada. Chef: Takashi Aoki Tokyo is home to anywhere from 80,000 to 150,000 restaurants and boasts more Michelin stars than any other place on earth. So, the question becomes, how the hell are you going to choose only 100 restaurants to represent this gourmand nirvana? While admitting the inherent futility of our task, that's exactly what we’ve gone ahead and done in our autumn issue, on shelf from October 1. Behold, the ultimate guide to Tokyo’s very best food, from the taste bud-bending sushi creations of Ginza’s Aoki (who were so kind to help out with our cover) to melt-in-your-mouth wagyu, the washoku of dreams and the most slurpable ramen in the galaxy.  And once you've chewed yourself through the irresistible restaurant lineup, we're serving you dessert in the form of an overview of the season's tastiest sweets, plus a look at the best depictions of Japan's culinary culture in cinema. All filled up and satisfied, you can then flip the page to find an expert's guide to the grooviest jazz joints in and around Tokyo, suggestions for Sideways-style winery tours in the Kanto region, a roundup of the city's finest skate parks and an in-depth anthropological report from Tokyo's craziest otaku bars. Pick up a free copy at any of our distribution points in the city or get the mag sent straight to your door by placing an order here. Release details: Title: Time Out Tokyo Magazine no. 12Publication frequency: 

Secret City – don't miss out on our summer issue

Secret City – don't miss out on our summer issue

  ART DIRECTION: STEVE NAKAMURA. PHOTOGRAPHY: KATSUMI OMORI, HAIR AND MAKEUP: MINAKO SUZUKI, STYLING: YASUHIRO TAKEHISA (MILD), CLOTHING: UEMULO MUNENOLI   Think something's off with that lady on the cover? You're right – and the mysteries don't stop there in our summer issue, which will take you underground, high up and down narrow alleyways, into black baths, an industrial fridge and face to face with a genuine humanoid. Yes, the time has come to uncover the hush-hush side of Tokyo, its hideout boozers, oases of greenery, street art, waterfalls and vibrator bars. The Secret City issue, on shelf from July 1, points you in the direction of 50 confidential spots and is your ultimate guide to city sights, eats and experiences known only to the initiated – until now, that is. We're also bringing you a bonanza of rather less classified but equally exciting news from the restaurant world with a roundup of the five best new openings in town this year, plus the lowdown on why all-night dancing has finally been legalised (!) in Japan, the only guide to Fuji Rock you'll ever need, and a recap of the Tokyo landmarks Godzilla has laid waste to over his 62-year career of destruction. Pick up a free copy at any of our distribution points in the city or get the mag sent straight to your door by placing an order here. Release details: Title: Time Out Tokyo Magazine no. 11Publication frequency: Four times per year (planned issues: 2016 - September, December)Format: 297 mm x 225 mm (slightly

Sip sake and shochu for Kumamoto

Sip sake and shochu for Kumamoto

Rescue and aid efforts are continuing in earthquake-hit Kumamoto, where tens of thousands of people are still living in temporary shelters. Last week, we outlined how to help those affected through donations – often the most efficient way to do your bit, as the local authorities reportedly have more than enough volunteers on site. Now, another admirable channel of support has emerged among Tokyo restaurants and watering holes specialising in eats and drinks from the Kyushu region: as reported by lifestyle mag Crea, more than a dozen city bars, izakayas and eateries have started booze-fuelled donation schemes that see the businesses part with a portion of their earnings in order to assist the recovery effort. The concept is simple: the more patrons at participating joints consume Kumamoto- and Kyushu-made wares – mainly nihonshu and shochu, both famed specialities of the region – the more these boozers will donate to earthquake relief. Getting drunk for a good cause – sounds like something we can get behind. Here's a full list of businesses taking part in the donation drive (visit Crea's website for address and contact details in Japanese): Juban Ukyo, Kakyo (both Azabu-Juban), Kasumicho San Maru Ichi no Ichi (Nishi-Azabu), Chiaki (Tsukiji), Renshan (Shirokane), Noyashichi (Arakicho, Shinjuku), Sonoyama (Ebisu), Itamae Bar, Sushi Saisho (both Ginza), Kappo Funyu (Honjo, Sumida), Vineria Hirano (Sendagaya), Kanogawa (Ogawamachi), Sushi Shun (Okachimachi).

Watch Tokyoites plug their favourite spots in the city

Watch Tokyoites plug their favourite spots in the city

What's the one place in our great city you like the most? That's the question posed to 30 Tokyoites by the creators of Tokyo Talk, a new video project documenting daily life in the capital and shining a spotlight on superb spots all across town, from Odaiba all the way to the wilds of Okutama. The answers are provided in the form of 30 fifteen-second clips, browsable by tags like 'waterfront', 'diversity', 'bicycle-friendly', 'global city', 'public transport' and 'walkable'. Check out the project's flashy site and take a moment to think about your favourite Tokyo location.       Tokyo Talk is operated by Time Out Tokyo, and the videos are produced in collaboration with the Play Tokyo project. The background tunes come courtesy of Jemapur, composer for up-and-coming electronic music duo Young Juvenile Youth.  

Hop aboard – our four-part Tohoku travel series starts here

Hop aboard – our four-part Tohoku travel series starts here

A couple of weeks from now, five long years will have passed since the triple disasters of 3.11, which devastated large swaths of the Tohoku coast and threw lives off balance all across eastern Japan, including Tokyo. The road to recovery has been long and steep, but the disaster-affected region is squarely on the mend, with travellers also slowly returning to an area rich in natural beauty, history and tasty edibles. Accompanied by a fellow Time Outer from New York, we headed up to the northeast for a week in January to see with our own eyes how Fukushima, Miyagi and Iwate prefectures are doing at present. In addition to studying the state of the recovery process, we were eager to learn about all there is to do, see, experience and eat in Tohoku right now. The results of our quest will be published over four weeks in both the print and online editions of Time Out New York, as well as on our own website. The first part, where we follow the samurai in Fukushima’s Aizu-Wakamatsu, is out now – read the article here. Produced in association with NHK World, our Tohoku article series is also timed to coincide with New York’s Japan Week, held at Grand Central Terminal from March 10 to 12. If you’re in the Big Apple on any of those three days, make sure to check it out – additional information can be found here.