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Keith Uhlich

Keith Uhlich

Keith Uhlich is the Film staff writer at Time Out New York. Like the bearded lady in Spaceballs, he's one of the freaks. Follow him on Twitter @keithuhlich.

Articles (12)

The 50 most-deserving Oscar winners of all time

The 50 most-deserving Oscar winners of all time

To the victor goes the spoils – and to the losers goes the social media outrage. That’s effectively how the Oscars operate. As the actual telecast honours the year’s standout cinematic performances, viewers jump on Twitter to express righteous anger over just how wrong the voters got it. It makes sense: the Academy has screwed up often enough that you almost expect it to happen half the time. Every once in a while, though, the Academy gets it spot-on – and those instances deserve recognition. Here are 50 times when they nailed the bullseye. Recommended: 👎 The 20 worst Oscar winners in history👍 The best films of 2022🙌 The most anticipated movies coming out in 2023đŸ”„ The 100 best movies of all time

The 50 best war movies of all time

The 50 best war movies of all time

War, what is it good for? Absolutely nothing – well, except for movies. Military conflict has formed the background of many great films, including some of the best of all time. It’s not a surprise. Few events are such natural conduits for drama, suspense, horror, heroism and examination of the human condition. It’s the basis for exploring a slew of existential questions. Why do we fight? Why do people enlist? What happens afterward? Is war ever justified? Is it ever worth it in the end?  Even if there’s rarely ever any clear answer, the best war movies attempt to examine combat from all sides. Simply asking those questions in the right way can produce compelling, often harrowing cinema. For this list, we’ve compiled films that span the historical and fictional gamut, from both World Wars to Vietnam to Iraq to imaginary interplanetary conflict. (Although we did not count Star Wars – sorry, nerds.) If you’ve seen battle yourself, many of these movies will resonate somewhere deep within you. And if you haven’t, perhaps it will give you some small measure of understanding for what those who’ve fought have seen, experienced and felt. Written by David Fear, Keith Uhlich, Joshua Rothkopf, Andy Kryza, Phil de Semlyen and Matthew Singer đŸŽ–ïžÂ The best World War I moviesđŸ’„ The 50 best World War II moviesđŸ”„Â The 100 best movies of all-time💣 The 101 best action movies ever made

The 50 best foreign films of all time

The 50 best foreign films of all time

In cultural shorthand, enjoying foreign films has long been a euphemism for snootiness. It’s a hacky stereotype that’s acted as a barrier between American audiences and some of the greatest movies ever made. It’s also wholly inaccurate. Sure, plenty of movies from non-English-speaking countries explore complex themes and big ideas, sometimes using methods far different from what viewers are accustomed to. But you’ll find just as many over-the-top action flicks, ridiculous comedies, heart-swelling musicals and stomach-knotting thrillers. Obviously, the world of international film is broad. So, In compiling this list of the best foreign movies of all-time, we had to set some parameters. We omitted silent films and determined that the movies had to be in a language that wasn’t English: so goodbye Britain and Australia. Other than those caveats, consider this your cinematic passport.  Written by David Fear, Keith Uhlich, Andy Kryza, Joshua Rothkopf & Matthew Singer  Recommended: đŸ”„ The 100 best movies of all-timeđŸ‡«đŸ‡· The 100 best French movies of all-time, rankedđŸ‡°đŸ‡· The best Korean movies of all-timeđŸ„‹ The 25 best martial arts movies of all-time 

The 100 best animated films of all time

The 100 best animated films of all time

No matter how snooty and highfalutin their taste in movies gets, every cineaste has to start somewhere. And we’re going to bet that, in most cases, it starts with a cartoon. Whether it’s a classic of Disney’s Golden Age, a more recent Pixar heart-tugger for the young’uns or something weirder that your parents thought was age-appropriate when they picked it off a video store shelf, most first cinematic loves are animated.  Of course, that doesn’t mean that animation is only a realm for children. On the contrary, the best animated movies work on multiple levels, for broad audiences. In composing this list, we polled Time Out writers and experts including Fantastic Mr Fox’s Wes Anderson and Wallace and Gromit’s Nick Park, and the results show just how expansive the genre can be. Our list incorporates everything from Disney to Studio Ghibli, stop-motion nightmares to psychedelic headtrips, illustrated documentaries to however-the-hell you classify the work of maverick Jan Ć vankmajer. Take a look and massage your nostalgia receptors – and maybe find something mindblowing you’ve never seen before. Written by Trevor Johnston, David Ehrlich, Joshua Rothkoph, Tom Huddleston, Andy Kryza, Guy Lodge, Dave Calhoun, Keith Uhlich, Cath Clarke and Matthew Singer Recommended: 🐭 The 50 best Disney moviesđŸ‡ŻđŸ‡” The 20 best anime movies of all-timeđŸ€Ł The best family comedy movies🩄 The 50 best fantasy movies of all-time  

The best Los Angeles movies of all time

The best Los Angeles movies of all time

Despite being the home of Hollywood, ‘LA movies’ seem less exalted as a subgenre than ‘New York movies’, or London movies, or Paris movies, or Rome movies. Maybe it just seems a bit too meta, or perhaps it’s because the city occupies such a polarising spot in the collective consciousness. (To love Los Angeles is to hate it, and to hate it is to really, really hate it.) In any case, the list of truly great LA movies is a bit tighter than those taking place in other large metropolises. But those films cover a lot of ground, from dramas set in the showbiz world to gritty thrillers depicting the inner city, fizzy-headed musical comedies to shadowy noirs that make the most of that twinkling, imposing skyline. Here’s our ranking of the 57 best Los Angeles movies of all-time. Recommended:Â đŸ”„ The 100 best movies ever made.đŸ“œïž The best LA movie theaters to visit.🌕 LA’s best outdoor movies to see this summer.

Os piores e os melhores filmes da Disney

Os piores e os melhores filmes da Disney

SerĂĄ que os filmes da Disney sĂŁo sensatos, divertidos e visualmente estimulantes – perfeitos para toda a famĂ­lia? Ou sĂŁo uma lamechice que sĂł serve para fazer uma lavagem cerebral Ă s crianças? Toda a gente tem uma opiniĂŁo sobre os mais de 50 filmes de animação que foram lançados ao longo dos anos pela empresa fundada por Walt Disney, a começar pela Branca de Neve, em 1937, atĂ© Ă s galinhas dos ovos de ouro que foram Frozen: O Reino do Gelo e a sua continuação. Mas quais sĂŁo afinal aqueles que merecem um lugar de destaque na prateleira? E quais os que mais valia serem esquecidos? ElencĂĄmos os piores e os melhores filmes de animação da Disney, disponĂ­veis no serviço de streaming Disney+. Recomendado: Filmes de animação que ganharam um Óscar

Os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre

Os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre

O potencial cinematogrĂĄfico (e nĂŁo sĂł) da ficção cientĂ­fica Ă© quase infinito. É nestes filmes que os nossos maiores pesadelos podem tornar-se realidade e os nossos sonhos concretizar-se, ao mesmo tempo que Ă© dito e posto em causa algo sobre o nosso presente. E o gĂ©nero sempre fez as delĂ­cias do pĂșblico, desde o tempo dos efeitos especiais bĂĄsicos e rudimentares dos filmes mudos ao excesso digital dos blockbusters contemporĂąneos. Hoje, no entanto, Ă© a prĂłpria crĂ­tica quem aplaude e celebra muitos destes filmes, tal como acontece com os super-herĂłis e o terror. A pensar nisso, elegemos os 100 melhores filmes de ficção cientĂ­fica de sempre. Recomendado: Filmes em cartaz esta semana

Os piores e os melhores filmes da Disney

Os piores e os melhores filmes da Disney

SerĂĄ que os filmes da Disney sĂŁo sensatos, divertidos e visualmente estimulantes – perfeitos para toda a famĂ­lia? Ou sĂŁo uma lamechice que sĂł serve para fazer uma lavagem cerebral Ă s crianças? Toda a gente tem uma opiniĂŁo sobre os mais de 50 filmes de animação que foram lançados ao longo dos anos pela empresa fundada por Walt Disney, a começar pela Branca de Neve, em 1937, atĂ© Ă  galinha dos ovos de ouro que foi Frozen: O Reino do Gelo e a sua continuação. Mas quais sĂŁo afinal aqueles que merecem um lugar de destaque na prateleira? E quais os que mais valia serem esquecidos? ElencĂĄmos os piores e os melhores filmes de animação da Disney, disponĂ­veis no serviço de streaming Disney+ a partir de 15 de Setembro. Recomendado: Os melhores filmes para toda a famĂ­lia

The best and worst Disney movies

The best and worst Disney movies

Are Disney films wise, funny and visually stunning – perfect for all the family? Or are they sappy and sentimental, brainwashing kids with all-American values? Everyone has an opinion of the 53 animations released over the years by the Walt Disney Company, beginning in 1937 with ‘Snow White’ and hitting new heights with last year’s box office bonanza ‘Frozen’. What cannot be denied is how loved these films are in every corner of the globe. But which Disney movies deserve a place on your DVD shelf, and which are best forgotten? We count down the best and worst Disney animated movies.

The 50 best sports movies of all time

The 50 best sports movies of all time

In ranking the 50 best sports movies of all time, we stuck to traditional athletics. (Please, chess and billiards fans, save the fury for another comments board.) That said, here are some of the best action movies of all time—and even an Oscar winner or two. To get in shape, we pounded the heavy bag, swore off sweets and drank plenty of raw eggs—by which we mean we watched a lot of Blu-rays. Surely there are titles we’ve missed. Raise a penalty flag if that’s the case. Remember, it’s not about winning, unless you’re counting backward in a ranked list. What’s the mightiest sports film of all time? Dive in and find out. RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

Take five: Wim Wenders

Take five: Wim Wenders

German filmmaker Wim Wenders, 66, is well-known for stirring performance docs like 1999's Buena Vista Social Club. Now the director adds a literal extra dimension to his oeuvre with Pina, a 3-D feature about the work of the late choreographer Pina Bausch. It's both an immersive spectacle and a fitting tribute to a great artist. TONY talked with Wenders during the most recent New York Film Festival, where the movie received a rapturous reception.Your first encounter with Pina Bausch's work was in 1985, correct?Yes. It was in Venice—a double-bill of Caf Mller and Le Sacre du Printemps. My girlfriend insisted we go. Anytime I had seen dance before, it had not touched me, so I went expecting to be bored. But that evening changed my life. After five minutes, I was completely shaken; I sat on the edge of my seat and was weeping uncontrollably.Did you meet Bausch during these performances?We met for a coffee the day after. Our conversation was pretty one-sided: Pina didn't say much, and I just babbled on enthusiastically. But we did mention that we should make a film together one day.It took a long time for the movie to come to fruition. How did 3-D become the key to getting it made?I had no clue it was going to be the solution. For years, I tried to figure out how to film Pina's dances. I looked at a number of dance films, trying to come up with ideas, and I just kept hitting a wall. Then, in 2007, I saw U2 3D. As soon as it started, I knew I'd found the missing link. The movie was

Listings and reviews (2)

The Blue Room

The Blue Room

3 out of 5 stars

The pieces are more intriguing than the whole in Mathieu Amalric’s jaggedly alluring murder thriller, adapted from a novel by prolific Belgian mystery writer Georges Simenon. The film deconstructs a soured love affair in which a man, Julien (Amalric), finds himself caught between his mistress Esther (StĂ©phanie ClĂ©au) and his wife Delphine (LĂ©a Drucker). It opens in sensuous and near-absurd fashion as Julien and Esther share an afternoon of passion in the eponymous room, their bodies abstracted – a breast in the corner of the frame, saliva-flecked lips shot in extreme close-up – and their orgasmic cries building. A drop of blood falls on the sheets: Esther has bitten Julien (to his baffled delight), but you might also say she’s vampirically infected him. Come what may, they will not be separated. No sooner has erotic bliss subsided than we’re in a sterile magistrate’s chambers where Julien is being interrogated about his involvement in some murderous business. We don’t find out the specifics of his alleged crime immediately. Instead, the film jumps around in time, from Julien and Esther’s first sexual encounter, to the cheating husband’s increasingly temperamental interactions with his spouse, back to that inviting blue-walled hotel room and forward to the oppressive courthouse where Julien and Esther’s fate will be decided. Shame and regret hang over every scene, and these feelings only deepen the longer the movie goes on. This is less of a whodunit than a psychological portr

Almayer's Folly

Almayer's Folly

5 out of 5 stars

It begins with a murder: A sparkle-suited pimp lip-synching to a Dean Martin ditty is stabbed in a Cambodian nightclub. Everyone scatters. Then a luminous young woman steps forward, looks directly into the camera and sings a haunting solo rendition of a Mozart choral. This preamble is surely a contender for scene of the year—and the rest of Chantal Akerman’s loose adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s novel about a merchant sailor (Stanislas Merhar) and his half-caste daughter (Aurora Marion) more than lives up to its defiantly strange opening. Imagine the Belgian writer-director’s latest as the inverse of her celebrated study of a French housewife on the edge, 'Jeanne Dielman' (1975), working backward from, and oftentimes around, the narrative’s confrontational denouement. Akerman’s formal control is, as always, astounding: Long takes abound, and the sound design, with its symphonic mix of chirping creatures, ambient buzzing and otherworldly music cues, is so immersive that you can almost feel the oppressive humidity of the occidental setting. But it is the richly evocative performances of Marion (aggressive yet enticing) and Merhar (wearing world-weariness like an aged suit) that cut deepest. They’re the perfect vehicles for Akerman to explore the heart-of-darkness existentialism so integral to Conrad, and you understand why—as in the two lengthy close-ups that bookend her uniquely enthralling feature—she lingers on both actors every chance she gets.

News (11)

Movie night with Baz Luhrmann (and Susan Sarandon): The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Movie night with Baz Luhrmann (and Susan Sarandon): The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Rejoice, fans of The Rocky Horror Picture Show! This Saturday 11 at 8:15pm, the IFC Center is hosting a special screening of the 1975 cult movie musical.Though it takes place earlier in the evening rather than at midnight, talking back at the movie is still surely encouraged (though we can't speak for throwing rice and other objects at the screen). However, the real news is that Baz Luhrmann, the musical-obsessed director of Moulin Rouge! (2001), will be in attendance with Rocky Horror star Susan Sarandon (who you might remember guest-edited our mag a few months back). The duo will discuss the film after it screens, and it should be fun to geek out along with them.

Who ya gonna call, ladies? Ghostbusters reboot is a go

Who ya gonna call, ladies? Ghostbusters reboot is a go

First Twin Peaks. Now news comes that a new installment in the phantom-fighting horror-comedy series Ghostbusters is officially greenlit. But there's a twist (isn't there always?): According to director-cowriter Paul Feig, it'll be a quartet of gals trying desperately not to cross the streams while bringing down the 21st-century equivalent of Gozer the Gozerian (see image above). Once your disappointment in the potential lack of Bill Murray and company subsides (and who's to say they won't make cameos?), this is a very intriguing development. With so many talented film comediennes out there, the casting possibilities are endless: Melissa McCarthy and Tina Fey? Kristens Wiig and Schaal? Maybe get indie darlings Jenny Slate and Lake Bell to strap on the famed ghostbusting packs. Who would you like to see take on the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man (or Woman)?

To boldly go or not?: William Shatner in Star Trek 3

To boldly go or not?: William Shatner in Star Trek 3

Oh Twittersphere, how we love thee. Earlier this morning, William Shatner posted a now-deleted tweet ("I'm baaaaccckk!!!") on his official account. The folks at the Hollywood Reporter coupled this with a prior story from Badass Digest and took it to mean that the Shat was returning to the role that made his career (Capt./Admiral James T. Kirk) in the third installment of the rebooted Star Trek franchise. (Read our own reviews of the first two films in the new series: Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek: Into Darkness (2013).)  Bill S. quickly worked to debunk the rumor in a followup tweet, but the story had already blown up to "print the legend" proportions. And let's admit, there's some giddiness-stoking fun to be had in the possibility (however remote) that old Captain Kirk may be back to share the screen with his younger self, played by Chris Pine. (If Leonard Nimoy and Zachary Quinto can do it
) Only time will tell if Shatner might really know more than he'd prefer to let on. Let's dream until then.

Twin Peaks: Back in Style on Showtime

Twin Peaks: Back in Style on Showtime

No television series has had quite the iconic and long-lasting influence as Twin Peaks, which brought surrealist filmmaking maestro David Lynch to the small screen. Along with his cowriting partner Mark Frost (not to mention a never-to-be-equaled ensemble cast), he promptly exploded the possibilities of long-form TV narrative, paving the way for network series like The X-Files and pay-cable discussion magnets like The Sopranos and True Detective.  "It is happening again," says the Giant (Carel Struycken)—one of the supernatural denizens of Twin Peaks's otherworldly Black Lodge—to our lawman hero Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan). And that's turned out to be prophecy: Twenty-five years after the series ended its run on ABC (a highly underrated feature film, Fire Walk With Me, was released in 1992), it's been announced via Deadline that Twin Peaks will return as a limited 9-episode series on Showtime in 2016. All installments will be written by Lynch and Frost, and directed by Lynch. (Aside from shorts and commercials, the latter hasn't made a proper feature since 2006's masterful Inland Empire.) In this interview with Michael Ausiello, Frost promises new and old faces will appear, and goes into some general specifics about the origins of the project. The first official teaser for the series is embedded below. 2016 can't come soon enough.    

Titles announced for the 2014 New York Film Festival

Titles announced for the 2014 New York Film Festival

Yesterday the powers-that-be at the Film Society of Lincoln Center announced the main slate for the cinematic event of the fall—the 52nd New York Film Festival. Previously we'd heard about the Opening Night feature (David Fincher's adaptation of author Gillian Flynn's massively popular thriller Gone Girl, pictured above, starring Ben Affleck as an unhappy spouse accused of murder); the Centerpiece selection (Paul Thomas Anderson's take on Thomas Pynchon's delightfully strange novel Inherent Vice, starring Joaquin Phoenix as a pot-addled private investigator); and the closing night film (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's batshit-looking black comedy Birdman or the Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance with Michael Keaton riffing on his former Batman persona). Now we get a look at the full list of 30 movies that will be screened in this exclusive, highly-regarded fest, several of which are world premieres, others that have screened at Sundance and Cannes.  Start your planning today by checking out our reviews of 2014 New York Film Festival titles we've already seen and reviewed on the circuit: Clouds of Sils Maria (Olivier Assayas), Foxcatcher (Bennett Miller), Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard), Maps to the Stars (David Cronenberg), Mr. Turner (Mike Leigh), Saint Laurent (Bertrand Bonello), Timbuktu (Abderrahmane Sissako), Whiplash (Damien Chazelle) and The Wonders (Alice Rohrwacher). 

Today in Richard Linklater news: Leaving 'Limpet' for 'Dazed and Confused' sequel, plus 'School of Rock' series

Today in Richard Linklater news: Leaving 'Limpet' for 'Dazed and Confused' sequel, plus 'School of Rock' series

Team film are big fans of Richard Linklater's latest, Boyhood, and while the film is showing pretty remarkable box office staying power, we can't help but wonder: What's next? The rumor was that the Texas auteur would be moving on to a redo of the 1964 live-action/animated feature The Incredible Mr. Limpet. (The original starred Don Knotts as—we kid you not—a talking fish.) But word comes now from the Hollywood Reporter that Linklater is exiting that project and moving on to something even more exciting, namely a sorta-sequel to his great teenage hangout movie Dazed and Confused (1993). Tentatively titled That's What I'm Talking About, the film transposes Dazed's day-in-the-life structure from a '70s high school to an '80s college. It's purportedly based on Linklater's own experiences, and we for one can't wait to see what he comes up with. (Maybe there's even a place for Boyhood's talented star Ellar Coltrane.) And if that weren't enough on the Linklater front, word has also come down that cable network Nickelodeon has ordered a 13-episode series based on the director's 2001 hit School of Rock. Casting hasn't been announced yet, though we doubt star Jack Black (who was also in R.L.'s 2011 black comedy, Bernie) will be returning to teach a new gaggle of kids about the best in rock-'n'-roll. Still, Linklater is executive producing the series, so hopefully its infectious spirit can live on in the transition from big-screen to small.

Watch the action-packed trailers for Mad Max: Fury Road and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1

Watch the action-packed trailers for Mad Max: Fury Road and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1

The movie-hype machine was in a post-apocalyptic kind of mood this weekend as the trailers for two highly anticipated dystopian thrillers premiered. Fans have been longing for a new entry in the seminal Mad Max series, and now—just about thirty years since Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (1985)—the former cop-turned-outlaw is back to wreak some bone-crunching, car-crushing havoc. Tom Hardy takes over for Mel Gibson in the title role, and his costars include seasoned celeb Charlize Theron (sporting what looks like a killer mechanical hand) as well as fresh-faced up-and-comers Nicholas Hoult and Rosie Huntington-Whitely. Perhaps most excitingly, though, series creator George Miller is back in the director's chair, and based on the the jaw-dropping trailer (a gearhead chase sequence set during a calamitous sandstorm? Yes, please!), it looks like he's still got a killer eye for action. Look for the movie sometime in 2015. And then there's Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence). When we last saw Panem's celebrated warrior—in 2013's The Hunger Games: Catching Fire—she was being airlifted to a secret base, home to an army rising up against the totalitarian government led by the vicious President Snow (Donald Sutherland). In the just-released teaser trailer for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1, we finally get a glimpse of her new environs, populated by characters old (the late Philip Seymour Hoffman's slippery double-agent Plutarch Heavensbee) and new (Julianne Moore's haunted-looking r

If you see one movie this week, go to


If you see one movie this week, go to


Dead Man (1995) This provocative and mesmerizing black-and-white Western from Jim Jarmusch (Only Lovers Left Alive) is arguably his masterpiece. A pre-Pirates of the Caribbean Johnny Depp stars as meek accountant William Blake (yes, he shares his name with the famous Romantic Age poet), who travels to the wild, wild west for a job and instead gets a bullet to the chest. Slowly dying, he embarks on a spiritual quest with the aid of Nobody (Gary Farmer), a hilariously condescending Native American with a killer catchphrase ("Stupid fucking white man") and prime survival skills. Jarmusch's oddball humor is fully evident; ready yourself for the Iggy Pop/Jared Harris/Billy Bob Thornton campfire sequence with its cross-dressing shenanigans and sudden bursts of slapstick violence. But this is also his most trenchant film for the way it confronts America's troubled (and troubling) history. All that a killer Neil Young guitar score! Nitehawk Cinema in Williamsburg is presenting the movie in 35mm on Fri 25 and Sat 26 at midnight, so you're sure to get an appreciative crowd for this cult classic.

New to home video and streaming: The Immigrant, Snowpiercer and Under the Skin

New to home video and streaming: The Immigrant, Snowpiercer and Under the Skin

It’s been a banner summer for cinephiles; this weekend was no exception. Viewers saw an army of CGI simians raging against their human masters (Dawn of the Planet of the Apes) as well as the vividly emotional spectacle of watching a Texas kid grow into a college-bound adult (Boyhood). But there were great things happening off the big screen, too, as three of our favorite recent movies now arrive on streaming services and Blu-ray. We’re big fans of writer-director James Gray (Two Lovers) and he outdid himself with his period melodrama The Immigrant, starring Marion Cotillard as a Ellis Island refugee who gets involved with a con artist in 1920s Manhattan. Beautifully photographed by the great cinematographer Darius Khondji, the film debuts on Netflix after a limited theatrical run. (Check out our list of other recent additions to the streaming service here.) Over the weekend, another movie came to home video—though, in a unique twist, not as it was losing theatrical venues, but gaining them. You can watch Bong Joon-ho’s inventive dystopian thriller Snowpiercer—which features Captain America himself, Chris Evans, as the leader of a revolution aboard a train populated by the last remnants of humanity—in the multiplex or on your personal monitor of choice via Amazon and other such services. This is all part of a new release strategy being tested by the film’s American distributor, The Weinstein Company. Though the movie is a thrilling big-screen experience, it’s nice to know you

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