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Sophia Satchell-Baeza

Sophia Satchell-Baeza

Articles (1)

This Londoner designed gig posters for Jimi Hendrix

This Londoner designed gig posters for Jimi Hendrix

‘I was born in India during WWII. My father was in the RAF and after the war ended, he and some fellow officers formed an airline. I spent my early childhood in Buenos Aires. When I was 12, my father lost all his money, my parents got divorced and my mum and I moved to London. I quickly became a north London boy, living between my aunt’s in Edgware and my mum’s in Stanmore. At school I was part of a high-spirited bunch of sixth formers: if we weren’t protesting politically, we would be visiting exhibitions, theatre productions or jazz clubs. Living in north London really shaped my taste in music. I met the singer Long John Baldry at Dino’s Café by Edgware station, and stayed talking to him for hours about the blues. ‘Our shop was a magnet for anybody with creative leanings’ At the start of the ’60s I was studying at UCL and getting into freelance journalism. My girlfriend at the time had a large collection of vintage clothes, and regularly scoured secondhand markets like Portobello or Caledonian Road. When the building on King’s Road where I worked as a journalist went belly-up, the landlord asked if I’d like to take it on to sell the clothes. I and my two partners, Sheila Cohen and John Pearse, opened the Granny Takes a Trip boutique in 1966. These were the days of the so-called “alternative culture”. London was at the epicentre, and we wanted to be part of that revolution. Our shop was a magnet for anybody with creative leanings. We didn’t want to be seen in a sharp unifor

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