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Trevor Johnston

Trevor Johnston

Articles (11)

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

A few years ago, a debate arose on social media about sex scenes in movies. ‘Sex scenes in movies are usually completely unnecessary, add nothing to the plot or character development, and just make me feel uncomfortable’, one Reddit user boldly stated. It seemed like an opinion that would instantly get shouted down by the commentariat. Instead, the vast majority of responses agreed with the post.  Well, allow us to retort, in 101 different ways. It’s certainly true that, in some ways, sex is superfluous. Those are what we call ‘bad movies’. You won’t find any of them on this list of cinema’s greatest sex scenes. What you will find are examples of sex as character development, or sex as a significant plot point. In some cases, sex is a punchline. In others, it’s downright horrifying. Indeed, cinematic sex is sometimes designed to make you feel uncomfortable. Other times, it’s simply meant to be arousing. And even if it only exists for pure titillation, there’s value in that, too. Turn off the lights, take the phone off the hook and slip into something more comfortable. Here are the 101 best sex scenes of all time. As the man once said: let’s get it on. Written by Dave Calhoun, Joshua Rothkopf, Cath Clarke, David Ehrlich, Phil de Semlyen, Daniel Walber, Trevor Johnston, Andy Kryza, Daniel Walber & Matthew Singer Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time❤ The 100 best romantic films of all-time😬 The 50 most controversial movies ever made💪 The 100 best feminist films of a

The Best Movies On Disney Plus To Watch Right Now

The Best Movies On Disney Plus To Watch Right Now

Disney Plus isn’t just about Avengers and Anakin Skywalker. There’s plenty of well-loved classic movies as well as some buried treasures, a fair stack of proper oddities and one of whatever the heck ‘Darby O’Gill and the Little People’ is on this new Mickeypedia. We’ve taken a tiny pickaxe to Mickey’s vast new movie collection to separate the great from the goofy.

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

What makes a great comedy? It could be the joke-laden script (obvs), performances that have comic timing down to a fine art, or the perfect chemistry of a vintage double act. It might be the way they’ve aged, deepening in pathos with every passing decade in ways their creators never imagined (see: Chaplin’s The Great Dictator). Equally, it could be a sense of fearlessness, of noting the likely scruples of audiences and critics and just telling their subversive jokes anyway (see: Mel Brooks’ entire CV). Sometimes, it’s about volume: throwing so many ridiculous gags at the screen that the overall effect leaves you gasping for air in between the belly laughs. There’s a reason Top Secret!, Airplane and The Naked Gun all make our list of the 100 Greatest Comedy Movies of all time.But it’s not just high-gag-rate spoofs that fill this list – there are great romcoms, satires, gross-out and teen comedies (there’s overlap there), screwballs… you name it, it’s here. With the help of comedies like Diane Morgan and Russell Howard, actors (thank you John Boyega and Jodie Whittaker, among others), directors like Richard Curtis and a small army of Time Out writers, we’ve painstaking scoured the genre’s history to cherry-pick the finest laugh machines in existence. Every taste and sense of humour is catered for here, no matter how silly or sophisticated. But if you’re not in the mood for a good chuckle right now, allow us to point you towards a few classic horrors, thrillers and action movies

The 100 best animated films of all time

The 100 best animated films of all time

Long before your love of sci-fi or romantic movies took wing, we’re betting you were friendly with talking animals. Chances are, the first movie you saw was animated: a Disney movie or a toon about a pig on TV. Animation is where we call come from, as we learn the building blocks of narrative storytelling from the simplest forms. But the genre has long been a refuge for adults as well. In researching the best animated movies ever made, we encountered plenty of Oscar winners, along with darkly imaginative foreign films from Japan, France and beyond. Our polled experts included Fantastic Mr. Fox’s Wes Anderson and Wallace & Gromit’s Nick Park. Dive in to our authoritative list and you’ll find nostalgia and new horizons alike. Written by Trevor Johnston, David Ehrlich, Joshua Rothkoph, Tom Huddleston, Andy Kryza, Guy Lodge, Dave Calhoun, Keith Uhlich and Cath Clarke. RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

The absolute best sex scenes of all time

The absolute best sex scenes of all time

What are the greatest movie sex scenes? The ones you really don’t want to come on when you’re enjoying a quiet night in front of the telly with your parents? It can be tough to avoid. From cinema’s seemingly chaste early days through a century-and-a-bit of shadowy film noirs, swooning romances, erotically charged ’80s thrillers and just about every film with Marlon Brando in, sex is there, ready to engulf us in its sweaty embrace. Some filmmakers chose to cut tastefully around the deed itself; some have thrown caution (and clothes) to the wind to let it all hang out. Others, like Michael Winterbottom with his explicit indie bonk-athon 9 Songs, take it even further. We’ve put together 101 of the most groundbreaking sex scenes of all time to chart how the movies have chosen to put the moves on. A fair few of these films have won Academy Awards; some are classic feminist movies; controversy has stalked many of them. Let us know which ones we’re missing.RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

Os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre

Os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre

O potencial cinematográfico (e não só) da ficção científica é quase infinito. É nestes filmes que os nossos maiores pesadelos podem tornar-se realidade e os nossos sonhos concretizar-se, ao mesmo tempo que é dito e posto em causa algo sobre o nosso presente. E o género sempre fez as delícias do público, desde o tempo dos efeitos especiais básicos e rudimentares dos filmes mudos ao excesso digital dos blockbusters contemporâneos. Hoje, no entanto, é a própria crítica quem aplaude e celebra muitos destes filmes, tal como acontece com os super-heróis e o terror. A pensar nisso, elegemos os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre. Recomendado: Filmes em cartaz esta semana

The 100 best comedy movies

The 100 best comedy movies

The best comedies in the history of cinema achieve more than just making you laugh (although, granted, it’s not a great comedy if it barely makes you crack a smile). Classic romcoms like ‘Notting Hill’ have us yearning for true love while teen movies like ‘Mean Girls’ get us cringing at memories of being too dorky to join the cool gang at school (and ‘10 Things I Hate About You’ ticks both boxes). Then there are the political satires, like ‘The Death of Stalin’, which serve up uncomfortable truths alongside the funnies. And finally, when we need to get into the festive spirit, the Christmas film archives are crammed with titles that leave you giggling into your eggnog.  All of which makes choosing the 100 best comedies of all time a little tricky. To help us with the task, we enlisted the help of comedians (such as Russell Howard and Diane Morgan), actors (John Boyega and Jodie Whittaker, among others), directors and screenwriters (including Richard Curtis), as well as several Time Out writers. So the next time you need something to turn that frown upside down, you’ll know where to start. RECOMMENDED:  London and UK cinema listings, film reviews and exclusive interviews

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

Nooky. Rumpy pumpy. Slap and tickle. Fourth base. La whoopsy-daisy. Whatever you call it, sex runs through cinema like an electric charge. From its seemingly chaste early days through a century-and-a-bit of shadowy film noirs, swooning romances, erotically charged ’80s thrillers and just about every film with Marlon Brando in – up to and very much excluding Apocalypse Now – it’s there, ready to spark chemistry into actual fireworks. Some filmmakers chose to cut tastefully around the deed itself; some have thrown caution (and clothes) to the wind to show it in all its glory. Others, like Nagisa Oshima with his notoriously explicit In the Realm of the Senses, take it even further. We’ve put together 101 of the most groundbreaking sex scenes of all time to chart how the movies have chosen to put the moves on. A fair few of these films have won Academy Awards; some are classic feminist movies; controversy has stalked many of them. Let us know which ones we’re missing.RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

Fuga de Pretoria

Fuga de Pretoria

⭑⭑⭑✩✩ Los miembros sudafricanos blancos del ANC también tuvieron su papel en la lucha por la libertad. En este drama de la vida real, vemos el desprecio en el que se retiene a los activistas Tim Jenkin y Stephen Lee, interpretados por Daniel Radcliffe y Daniel Webber, cuando en 1979 los condenan por distribuir panfletos contra el régimen. Tienen todo el derecho a estar nerviosos cuando llegan a una prisión solo para blancos en las afueras de Pretoria, y se encuentran en grupo junto con los otros detenidos políticos. Con pocas perspectivas de excavar un túnel o escalar las altas paredes, se les ocurre un plan de escape muy loco. Si pueden cortar las llaves de madera como las que cuelgan de los cinturones de los carceleros, deberían poder desbloquear la salida... ¡Claro!, ayuda que el circuito cerrado aún no había llegado a las instalaciones. Esto les permite correr por la noche mientras se enfrentan a las 11 puertas que necesitan abrir. Aún así, el director británico Francis Annan presenta una creciente tensión con un agarre de acero, ya que evadir la detección es una tarea tan importante como crear las llaves a partir de los recortes de un taller de carpintería. Dejando sus días mágicos aún más atrás, Radcliffe es muy persuasivo como el intenso y concentrado Jenkin, que está carcomido por la ansiedad cuanto más se prolonga el proceso. Webber tiene poco con lo que trabajar a su lado, y su volátil cohorte francés (Mark Leonard Winter) es una construcción ficticia, aunque dado q

The 50 best sports movies of all time

The 50 best sports movies of all time

In ranking the 50 best sports movies of all time, we stuck to traditional athletics. (Please, chess and billiards fans, save the fury for another comments board.) That said, here are some of the best action movies of all time—and even an Oscar winner or two. To get in shape, we pounded the heavy bag, swore off sweets and drank plenty of raw eggs—by which we mean we watched a lot of Blu-rays. Surely there are titles we’ve missed. Raise a penalty flag if that’s the case. Remember, it’s not about winning, unless you’re counting backward in a ranked list. What’s the mightiest sports film of all time? Dive in and find out. RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

Five actors stealing the limelight at the Edinburgh Film Festival

Five actors stealing the limelight at the Edinburgh Film Festival

Newly appointed artistic director Mark Adams brought a glitzier, more audience-friendly approach to this year’s Edinburgh Film Festival, which closed on Sunday. After smashing the box office at home, Pixar’s latest animation ‘Inside Out’ arrived in the Scottish capital for its UK premiere to open the festival. What followed was a mix of Hollywood glamour and homegrown talent. Here are the actors who set Edinburgh buzzing

Listings and reviews (84)

Il Buco

Il Buco

3 out of 5 stars

The cave opening frames the blue sky like a human smile, as we angle upwards to spot a couple of cows peering down over the edge. It might remind some viewers of that old Oscar Wilde zinger about some of us being in the gutter but looking up at the stars, and it's certainly an opening image that's both earthbound and cosmic.Yep, this is a film about a massive hole in the ground, in Calabria, in 1961 – and if there's anyone who could even think of doing that it’s surely director Michelangelo Frammartino, the man who turned mounds of charcoal, an old shepherd, and cute baby goats into the stuff of arthouse entrancement with 2010’s Le Quattro Volte. Carefully composed and paced, this certainly looks like the work of the same filmmaker. The wind whistles and cowbells clang in a remote, verdant valley as another grizzled old geezer watches over his livestock. A timeless scene, but at night the local bar has the village's only TV set beaming in black and white images of Italy's economic miracle, which has built the country's tallest building in Milan and left the distant south far behind.  We are, in effect, watching a historical reconstruction, underlined when an official party of Piedmont speleologists bring their gear to the very same valley to explore an uncharted cave system. As their lorry negotiates its way off-road, it's like invaders have arrived from another planet. Don’t come looking for some simplistic ‘tech = bad’ vs ‘green = good’ smackdown We expect the film to dram

Koko-di Koko-da

Koko-di Koko-da

3 out of 5 stars

If you go down in the woods today, prepare for several nasty surprises. A Swedish couple have already been through a lot, having lost their daughter just before she could unwrap a vintage music box they’d picked out for her eighth birthday. Time has moved on, and they’re still together, though bickering constantly, when they decide to go off-road in deep countryside and camp out in a clearing. Where their nemesis will pounce in the form of an oddly-matched trio – a boater-topped variety entertainer, a hulking giant and a kimono-wearing lady – whose scary dog is hungry for fresh meat. Writer-director Johannes Nyholm is keener on unsettling suggestion than outright gore, although, as these terrifying events rewind and repeat, like some weird fusion of Groundhog Day and Funny Games, it seems as if the ill-fated duo are trapped in some howling feedback loop of grief and paranoia. Which doesn’t answer the question of why the three psychos are the same distinctive figures painted on the side of the aforementioned music box, whose single nursery-rhyme song about a dead cockerel (pronounced ‘koko-dee koko-day’, by the way) haunts the soundtrack like an aggressively invasive earworm. Whether all this adds up to anything is a seriously moot point, since the film gestures towards psychological portraiture before veering off into dark fable territory, and seems to be open to multiple interpretations rather than a single coherent throughline. Still, while it’s often as exasperating as its

Escape from Pretoria

Escape from Pretoria

3 out of 5 stars

The ANC’s white South African members played their part in the struggle for freedom, too. In this true-life drama, we see the contempt in which activists Tim Jenkin and Stephen Lee – played by Daniel Radcliffe and Daniel Webber – are held when in 1979 they’re convicted of leafleting against the regime. They’ve every right to be nervous when they arrive at a tough whites-only prison on the outskirts of Pretoria, and find themselves lumped together with the other political detainees. With little prospect of tunnelling out or scaling the high walls, they come up with an admittedly bonkers escape plan. If they can cut wooden keys the same as those hanging from their jailers’ belts, they should be able to unlock their way out... Okay, so it helps that CCTV hasn’t yet come to the facility. This gives them the run of the place at night as they face the eleven doors they need to open. Still, black British director Francis Annan presents the escalating tension with a steely grip, since evading detection is as much of a task as creating the keys from woodwork shop offcuts. Putting his wizarding days even further behind him, Radcliffe is very persuasive as the intense, focused Jenkin, who’s gnawed by anxiety the longer the process goes on. Webber has little to work with beside him, and their volatile French cohort (Mark Leonard Winter) is a fictional construct – though given that the script is based on Jenkin’s memoir, we’re not too far from the truth. That said, while the historical co

A Paris Education

A Paris Education

3 out of 5 stars

They chuck learned quotes from Pascal and Flaubert at one another, while swooning over obscure Russian movies. Welcome to the world of film students at Paris 8 uni, where no one actually wears a beret, but they smoke a lot, knock back copious amounts of red wine and sleep around, all in chic black and white. Pretentious, nous? Well, absolutely, but that’s the point of this expansive coming-of-age drama from writer-director Jean-Paul Civeyrac, who knows what’s he’s talking about since he teaches at one of Paris’s top film schools. From that brief description you’ll already know whether this sounds indescribably up itself, or a deliciously Gallic survey of a would-be artist’s formative years. It takes itself all very seriously, but ‘A Paris Education’ has strong insights into the vulnerability of lanky Lyonnais new arrival Etienne (newcomer Andranic Manet, spot-on), who comes under the potentially destructive influence of an opinionated film snob (Corentin Fila), whose supposedly wonderful films no one, of course, has ever seen. There’s a lot of pensive chat about why you’d even want to make films when the world’s obviously falling apart, and while much of the action feels hermetically timeless to a counter-productive extent, we do cumulatively get drawn into Etienne’s unfolding intellectual micro-crises. It may not have quite the emotional impact of similarly themed titles like Olivier Assayas’s ‘Late August, Early September’ or Mia Hansen-Løve’s ‘Eden’, yet the film’s quiet s

Quezon’s Game

Quezon’s Game

2 out of 5 stars

An under-recognised area of Holocaust history gets an airing with this Filipino-made historical drama chronicling President Quezon’s struggles to offer Jewish families refuge from the Nazis in the early part of World War II. It’s a little-known story which means writer-director Matthew Rosen’s debut feature has to strain to explain the specific political context, to the film’s detriment. We start in 1938 when the Philippines is two years into a decade-long transition to gain full independence from the US, so America still controls visa restrictions on new arrivals. The country’s elected leader, Manuel Quezon, needs to keep Washington sweet since invasion by the Japanese is a very real prospect, but tension looms when a Jewish cigar-maker in Manila suggests inviting Jewish professionals from Germany to help the Philippines’ much-needed modernisation. The US administration has already refused entry to German Jewish refugees, so can they be persuaded to allow them into the Philippines? It’s an intriguing set-up, though the movie unfortunately makes heavy weather of moving the drama forward. There’s lots of clunky dialogue exchanges in the corridors of power, but little action to go with it, and fake vintage newsreels with not-altogether-convincing narration to help Rosen get his points across. Raymond Bagatsing is a handsome, if dramatically inert, presence as the earnest Quezon, and the movie’s reverent portrayal loses much sense of an actual human being behind the worthy aspir

Long Day’s Journey into Night

Long Day’s Journey into Night

4 out of 5 stars

Start chasing after memories and you risk disappearing down a rabbit hole, suggests this virtuoso Chinese drama. Back in his hometown after 20 years away, Luo (Jue Huang) decides to find the girl who left him all those years ago. It’s always raining in China’s tropical south-east, and while Luo’s voiceover and the roving camera echo the work of Wong Kar-wai, the surrounding urban wasteland provides a setting straight out of Andrei Tarkovsky’s ‘Stalker’. Meanwhile, the moody atmosphere showcases a story split in two. Firstly, we cut between Luo’s quest and his possibly addled memories of the girl in question (Wei Tang from ‘Lust, Caution’). Then Luo, maybe on the verge of tracking down his elusive prey, goes to the movies, slips on his 3D glasses and the film turns into a gobsmacking extended single take in 3D. From there, things only get stranger. If you like everything cut-and-dried it might prove a slog. But as Luo’s life seems to loop back on itself, a hypnotic spell is cast. If he can just get to the end of this corridor, or up these stairs, perhaps the answer awaits? Writer-director Bi Gan has a marvellous eye for scuzzy, rainswept visual poetry. His tracking shots entice you into a miasma of memory from which there seems no escape. You may not have a clue as to the whys and wherefores of it all, but you’ll certainly know you’ve seen something. 

The Gangster, The Cop, The Devil

The Gangster, The Cop, The Devil

3 out of 5 stars

Sylvester Stallone was impressed enough to commission a US remake of this niftily plotted Seoul-set crime movie. Not only that, but he’s signed its burly Korean lead Ma Dong Seok to reprise his starring role as a gang boss hunting down the serial killer who nearly offed him. The part is the kind of brawny showcase that might have been suited to Sly’s own skillset – here’s a guy who can pull out a rival’s front teeth with his bare hands – which gives a hint of the impact Ma makes. The Korean-American former mixed martial arts trainer boasts a steely-eyed, barrel-chested charisma endearing him more to the audience than the story’s nominal hero cop. This ambitious low-ranking detective has connected a series of seemingly random fatal knifings, but needs the ganglord’s help to identify the perpetrator, and the latter’s myriad henchmen to work the case. There’s a strong element of contrivance here, but we go with it, drawn in by the don’s determination to seek vengeance on the miscreant who’s tarnished his daunting reputation. Underworld enmities spark significant collateral carnage along the way, including one mass rumble with blades and iron bars that’s seriously hair-raising. Meanwhile, lurid splashes of neon illuminate the Seoul backstreets, delivering visual allure for fans of Korean genre fare. Rumination over the whys and wherefores of legal punishment compared with the crime fraternity’s own ruthless methods proves fairly superficial, though with his chillingly creepy smil

Hero – Inspired by the Extraordinary Life & Times of Mr. Ulric Cross

Hero – Inspired by the Extraordinary Life & Times of Mr. Ulric Cross

3 out of 5 stars

This film’s lengthy full title reads ‘Inspired by the Extraordinary Life & Times of Mr Ulric Cross’, and this blend of biopic and documentary does indeed tell the story of a remarkable individual. Trinidadian war hero, lawyer and subsequent post-imperial political fixer, Cross was never a name familiar to the public at large, but played his part in pivotal historical moments as colonial rule gave way to independent African states. We see a little of the man himself in his final days, before he passed away aged 96 in 2013, but the focus here is on his youthful prime, played by actor Nickolai Salcedo. As WWII’s most decorated West Indian in the RAF, he later qualifies in law, yet his ambitions soon hit a career colour bar in peacetime Britain.Writer-director Frances-Anne Solomon works wonders on a tight budget, blending newly-shot interiors with some wonderfully atmospheric archive footage to trace Cross’s subsequent path across Ghana, Cameroon and Tanzania where his idealism and legal expertise makes him just the man to help set up new independent administrations. The film’s strongest suit is showing how existing tribal loyalties proved as much of an obstacle to progress as the economic muscle of former colonial powers, and if it’s not exactly crowd-pleasing subject matter it’s certainly alert and engaging on a BBC4 level. Sadly, it fades slightly in the wrap-up, attempting to show how a father’s achievements inspired his daughter, yet we’re still left feeling we’ve had a good

Arifa

Arifa

2 out of 5 stars

She’s restless, anxious, even angry at times, because 28-year-old Londoner Arifa just doesn’t have the life she wants. In this UK indie character drama, Shermin Hassan’s protagonist is toiling in a self-perpetuating cycle: understandably eager to move away from her Pakistani parents, yet the longer the relationship search goes on, the likelier she is to say the wrong things to prospective suitors and leave herself stuck on the shelf. It’s a situation which will doubtless strike a chord with viewers, yet while there’s so much that’s relatable about the film, first-time writer-director Sadia Saeed also turns out to be her own worst enemy. A sympathetic lead is one thing, but without a fully developed story and a convincing supporting cast, it falls somewhat short overall. We can all be sympathetic, for instance, towards Arifa’s tendency to put her foot in it, but the men she chooses fall so obviously into the ‘avoid’ category, it’s exasperating to see her even bothering with them. Moreover, while debutant Hassan absolutely nails her part, from mouthy volatility to tearful vulnerability, both Rez Kempton (her slightly creepy boss) and Luca Pusceddu (a mysterious Italian ‘professional gamer’) deliver wooden, unconvincing turns in the love interest department. The movie just spends too much time stalling, and even though there are certainly valid insights into the way Asian women constantly feel judged by their background, there’s a decided lack of comic or dramatic oomph in the t

Kusama Infinito

Kusama Infinito

3 out of 5 stars

Sus pinturas y esculturas cubiertas de lunares han colocado a la japonesa Yayoi Kusama entre las artistas vivas más populares del mundo, pero tuvo que trabajar duro para llegar hasta ahí. Esa es la clave de este documental biográfico, convencional, pero esclarecedor, que muestra cómo el arte —a menudo brillante— de Kusama es una respuesta a las profundas cicatrices que su vida le ha infligido.  Con 89 años de edad, con una peluca carmesí y una túnica a juego, parece que acaba de salir de una de sus propias obras de arte; sin embargo, mientras se ocupa de un nuevo y extenso lienzo, también sabemos que su estudio está muy cerca del hospital psiquiátrico, donde ha estado bajo cuidado (por elección) desde un intento de suicidio en 1977. Kuzama Infinito parece cautelosa de no entrometerse de más, pero nos brinda un esquema suficientemente amplio para captar el impacto psicológico de su educación provincial represiva; el racismo y sexismo de la escena artística de Nueva York y sus performances al desnudos en Estados Unidos en protesta contra la Guerra de Vietnam que escandalizaron a los medios de comunicación.  Con un tema tan jugoso, tal vez un cineasta más valiente hubiera sacado algo más intenso de la historia retorcida de Kusama, pero si todo parece un poco subestimado, el enfoque sobrio y objetivo ofrece un manual fácil de usar. Sobre todo, enmarca la agotadora trayectoria de Kusama, desde el rechazo hasta la adulación, como una historia verdaderamente inspiradora del mundo de

Eating Animals

Eating Animals

4 out of 5 stars

Meat might well be murder, but it doesn’t have to be torture as well. That’s the message of this documentary, which showcases the efforts of small-scale American farmers to raise rare-breed pigs, chicken and turkeys with compassion, in stark contrast to the brutal standards of factory farming. Clandestine filming of the horribly euphemistic Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) – huge sheds where juiced-up poultry and pigs balloon like their corporate masters’ profits – is distressing enough to turn you vegan. However, this adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer’s 2009 treatise doesn’t set out to put you off your pork chop. Instead, producer Natalie Portman’s articulate narration guides us towards more informed choices about what we put on our plates. On the one hand, director Christopher Dillon Quinn captures bucolic footage of hand-raised happy porkers and frisky turkeys providing high-quality fare for high-end consumers. Meanwhile, factory farming pumps America’s rivers full of shit, commits myriad cruelties against animals and traps farmers in contractual servitude. What’s more, legislation now makes it a felony to film inside CAFOs, preventing the public seeing how its food is produced. ‘Eating Animals’ encourages us to seek a better way of doing things, whether via veggie meat substitutes or paying more for ethically sourced produce. It’s vital viewing for concerned carnivores as well as vegan converts. 

El pueblo y su rey

El pueblo y su rey

3 out of 5 stars

La Revolución Francesa da lugar a una película ampulosa, lenta, que comienza en 1789, con la toma de la Bastilla, para seguir toda la serie de acontecimientos que llevaron al rey a la guillotina. El problema es que el director y guionista Pierre Schoeller parece algo despistado a la hora de disponer los hechos en una narración dinámica y atractiva. Pretender condensar cuatro años del derribo del Antiguo Régimen en dos horas de metraje resulta en un resumen superficial que no es ni una lección de historia ni un drama desgarrador. Muchas caras conocidas del 'star system' francés copan el casting, mientras la atención de la cámara se debate entre un grupo de parisinos sorprendentemente bien articulados y los políticos de la Asamblea Nacional, cada vez más poderosos.