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Walker Schulte Schneider

Walker Schulte Schneider

Contributor

Walker is a third-year law student, a New York City historian, and a former professional ghost tour guide. 

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Seven haunted spots in the Village that’ll give you chills

Seven haunted spots in the Village that’ll give you chills

Greenwich Village is the crown jewel of New York City—an exciting and eccentric neighborhood covered in leafy trees and beautiful old buildings. Although it lies at the halfway point between the bustling density of the Financial District and the glass-covered skyscrapers of midtown, the Village has tenaciously maintained its independent spirit over the centuries—perhaps a bit too tenaciously... RECOMMENDED: Behind the screams: A look behind The Village Halloween Parade Greenwich Village is one of New York City’s most haunted neighborhoods. Tales of murder, witchcraft and grave robbing are etched into its streets. The prosperous, the impoverished, and the free-spirited have all called it home… and many have decided to stick around long after their deaths. These are the seven spookiest spots to visit in Greenwich Village this fall. CHECK OUT: This NYC artist made life-sized ‘Hocus Pocus’ puppets for the Village Halloween Parade

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Five hidden secrets of McSorley’s Old Ale House

Five hidden secrets of McSorley’s Old Ale House

Down in the heart of the East Village, tucked around the corner from the imposing Cooper Union, lies McSorley’s Old Ale House, arguably the greatest Irish pub in New York City.  Since its establishment in 1854, McSorley’s sawdusted floors and tchotchke-covered walls have beckoned countless New Yorkers and visitors alike. It’s been home to presidents and poets, scallywags and scribes—and just about everyone in between.   RECOMMENDED: The best St. Patrick’s Day events in NYC The bar is known for many things: its unchanging appearance (the last time its decorations were changed was in 1910 when the founder “Old John” McSorley died); its limited drinks selection (patrons are challenged with a choice of light or dark beer); its literary fame (New Yorker essayist Joseph Mitchell called it a “Wonderful Saloon” while e.e. cummings described it as “snug and evil”); and a certain magic that its communal tables seemingly conjure every night when they manage to turn strangers into close friends—if only for a fleeting moment or two.  But that’s what is commonly known about McSorley’s. After nearly two centuries of operation, the bar has compiled its own canon of secrets. Now, just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, I’m going to share of few of my favorites with you. 1. An original John Wilkes Booth “wanted” poster  Photograph: Walker Schulte Schneider High on the wall above the bar, angled a few degrees towards the ground, hangs an original wanted poster for John Wilkes Booth, the actor and

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