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Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney

Articles (5)

The most haunted places in NYC

The most haunted places in NYC

In the city that never sleeps, there are haunted places in NYC whose inhabitants might keep you up at night or heading home early. From historic haunted houses to long-time taverns, the tenants at these venues might give off an eerie feeling or prompt a sudden urge to change your plans. Fact or fiction, these personas of paranormal activity will put you on high alert if you’re brave enough to pay a visit or take ghost tours. So keep your eyes wide open while reading about some of the spookiest places in NYC and deciding what to do for Halloween. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Halloween in NYC

New Yorkers’ share their New Year’s resolutions for 2016

New Yorkers’ share their New Year’s resolutions for 2016

With 2016 right around the bend, it’s once again time for us all to decide how we plan on bettering ourselves in the New Year whether it's trying new fitness classes or eating healthier. Granted, most New Year’s resolutions fall by the wayside by President’s Day, but it’s worth giving it a shot. That said, figuring out what your New Year’s resolution should be can be trickier than you think. So to give you a kick-start, we hit the streets and found 17 New Yorkers willing to share their own self-improvement plans for 2016. RECOMMEDED: See the full guide to New Year's Eve in NYC

Six Christmas Day movies to see in theaters

Six Christmas Day movies to see in theaters

The days leading up to Christmas in New York offer plenty to do, including Christmas concerts and festive holiday markets. This year, film lovers are in for a special treat, with December 25 falling on a Friday. Check out our guide to six Christmas Day movies to see in theaters on opening day, and be sure to browse through our list of the best upcoming movies for regular updates. RECOMMENDED: Our full guide to Christmas in New York

10 cool things to do in NYC after dark

10 cool things to do in NYC after dark

The switch back to standard time means night will soon fall across NYC before most of us get out of work—or before socially acceptable drinking hours (boozy hot drinks, anyone?). But New Yorkers don’t let a little darkness (or cold weather) stop them. While you’re enjoying the fall foliage and out trying to check off all of the best things to do this fall, here’s a few more to add to your list.

The 10 best CSAs in New York

The 10 best CSAs in New York

If there’s one downside to living in NYC (beyond the sky-high rent), it’s that many virtues of the country—fresh air, open roads, food straight off the farm—often seem so far out of reach. Luckily, CSAs are changing that last one by connecting farmers and city residents, giving the former a steady, direct source for their products and the latter easy access to the bounty of the land. This means no more dealing with those color-coded lines at Whole Foods or other grocery stores. Much of the food CSAs provide is organic and almost all of it is from small, (fairly) local farms—so while you may pay a little more for this food than you might at Key Food, you can be sure your dollars are doing a lot more good, and your dishes are becoming a bit more delicious.

News (23)

10 things you probably didn’t know about Manhattan

10 things you probably didn’t know about Manhattan

As a New Yorker, you probably think you know everything about this great city we all call home. Well, wrong-o, bucko. We rounded up a list of 10 facts—starting with Manhattan—that we bet will be news to you.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Manhattan, NY 1. It wasn't wild when Peter Minuit showed up Before Peter Minuit popped by in 1609 and bought Manhattan for $24 worth of beads (it was actually around $1,050 in modern-day money, but that's still a steal), the city was a verdant wonderland where Native Americans lived in harmony with deer and beaver, right? Not quite. Manhattan, like much of the area, was fairly heavily colonized by the Lenape Indians, who were using slash-and-burn agricultural techniques, harvesting large amounts of seafood from the waters, and pounding down thick foot trails—one of which would become Broadway.  2. Grand Central Terminal is at 42nd Street for a specific reason Back in the mid-1800s, Manhattan—then as now—was largely dependent on trains. But back then, locomotives were loud, steam- and soot-belching monsters—which was fine for use in the countryside, but a nuisance in the crowded, noisy streets of lower Manhattan. So in 1854, the city banned locomotives south of 42nd Street (which was pretty far north in those days). But the Hudson, New Haven, and Harlem Railroads still wanted to expand, so they joined forces to build a new joint train station right at the southern end of the line—and Grand Central Terminal was born. 3. You can catch a run of gre

10 insider tips for doing Times Square on New Year's Eve

10 insider tips for doing Times Square on New Year's Eve

So, you've decided—against your friends' advice and all common sense—to brave the madness that is Times Square on New Year's Eve. Maybe you like the idea of being butt cheek-to-butt cheek with nearly one million strangers, maybe it's your lifelong dream to get within spitting distance of Ryan Seacrest, maybe you're just a masochist. We're sure you have your reasons...even if we don't understand them. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Times Square New Year’s Eve But since you've decided that there's no better place to kick off 2017 than the Crossroads of the World, we've put together a few suggestions to help grease the skids of your Times Square New Year's Eve experience. Follow these tips, and you should be able to watch the ball drop with a minimum of stress. 1.) Get there early.Sounds obvious, no? But seriously, get there earlier than you think you should. The NYPD closes off blocks as they fill up with gawkers, starting at 43rd Street and making their way up the square as it fills. (Which ties in to tip #2 below.) If you want a prime viewing spot, the city recommends arriving before 3pm; the best spots usually start filling up by noon.  2.) Enter from the north.Make like the White Walkers and come down from the north. Since the ball drops at the southern end of Times Square, the area fills up from the bottom, so filtering down from the top lets you ease your way into the crowds, rather than trying to punch in where they're most dense.  3.) Don't take the subway to Times Square.T

25 marvelous things to do in NYC this weekend

25 marvelous things to do in NYC this weekend

September 11 The Society Boutique Fall Opening Sale The Society Boutique; Sept 11–13 at 10:30am; freeFighting cancer, saving the planet and scoring a new wardrobe—all at once? It's as easy as heading to this UES secondhand shop's sale, where you can score classy new (to you) duds like pearl necklaces, Manolo Blahnik heels and Tory Birch skirts. And all the proceeds from this weekend's sale go to the MSK Cancer Center. Renegade Craft Fair Brooklyn Expo Center, Brooklyn; Sept 11–13 at 11am; freeThere are few better ways to while away a few weekend hours than perusing this collection of handmade products, with everything from toys to jewelry to clothing to pet wares on sale. Plus, there's food from delicious local eateries like Jessy's Pastries and Curry Station, a free photo booth and, in case all that shopping wears you down, Cafe Grumpy coffee. Feast of San Gennaro Little Italy; Sept 11–13 at 11:30am; freeYeah, Little Italy's become a tourist trap, but admit it—you love it when they close down Mulberry Street for this annual party. There's live music, cannoli-eating competitions and every kind of greasy and/or fried food imaginable (Italian or otherwise). Plus, it's a good opportunity to buy some cheesy "I♄NY" T-shirts to give your relatives in Minnesota for Christmas. Refinery 29's 29Rooms, 29Rooms, Brooklyn; Sept 11, 12 at noon; freeTo celebrate its 10th anniversary, Refinery29 is opening up a giant interactive fun house in Greenpoint. It's a rolling warehouse party with 29

Come out to plaaaaayyy with The Warriors at their Coney Island reunion this Sunday

Come out to plaaaaayyy with The Warriors at their Coney Island reunion this Sunday

Thirty-six years ago, The Warriors leapt onto the screen, searing its depiction of the post-apocalyptic '70s-era NYC and its gangland culture into our collective consciousness. These days, the city is, shall we say, a fair degree more civilized. But in spite of that sea change (or maybe because of it), the movie has grown to iconic status in the years since. Well, the Warriors are heading back to Coney Island once again—and this time, you're invited. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Coney Island in NY The Warriors Last Subway Ride Reunion goes down this Sunday, with 20 members of the film's cast gathering together right by the boardwalk at the Surf Pavilion to sign autographs, answer questions and hang with die-hard Warriors fans. There'll be a cosplay contest, food and drink, and of course, a screening of the film. The whole event kicks off at 10am and goes until 11pm; tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for tweens and fire/police/military personnel. Just be sure you have some Joe Walsh cued up for the subway ride out there—we hear it can be a pain. 

America's most and least desired celebrity neighbors both live in New York

America's most and least desired celebrity neighbors both live in New York

New Yorkers know all about having celebrity neighbors. Not only is the city jam-packed with famous people, but unlike L.A. with its gated mansions, NYC living means the folks who populate People tend to sleep in the same building as not-so-famous folks. You never know who you could bump into in the hallway, or who could knock on your door at 11pm because he/she ran out of paper towels. Maybe they'd invite you to their next house party! Maybe they'd keep you up all night with their screaming! Either way, it'd be a lot more entertaining than weird old Mr. Heckles downstairs. And as it turns out, New York is home to the person Americans think would make the best famous next-door neighbor...and the one they think would be the worst.  According to Zillow, Taylor Swift is America's Most Desirable Celebrity Neighbor, scooping up 12 percent of the vote in the real estate website's "most desirable neighbor for 2016" poll. In case you've spent the last two years living in the abandoned City Hall subway station, Taylor came to New York—which had been waiting for her—in early 2014, moving into a seven-bedroom Tribeca loft apartment she picked up for $19.95 million and has subsequently filled with sparkling water and, by her own admission, cat hair.  America's Least Desirable Celebrity Neighbor, on the other hand, is none other than New York's own ambulatory embarrassment factory, Donald Trump. The Republican front-runner (seriously, still with this, America?) took 24 percent of the vote

Sounds everyone else hates that New Yorkers find comforting

Sounds everyone else hates that New Yorkers find comforting

Living in New York takes thick skin—and eardrums. Life outside on the streets of NYC is anything but muted. How you react to the hubbub is one of the ways NYC separates its wheat from its chaff; the wheat learns to love the roar, the chaff moves back to Ohio. As a result, New Yorkers have come to love certain sounds that cause people from other places to slap their hands over their ears and curse loudly. Honking horns The symphony of overlapping automobile horns just might be the sound most identified with New York City. It’s the New Yorker’s constant companion, whether at 2pm in midtown or 2am in the East Village. The city has attempted to crack down on the noise in recent years, threatening unnecessary honkers with a $350 fine; in reality, this has done as much good as Mayor de Blasio standing on Fifth Avenue and shaking his fist at the traffic. Sirens These electronic wails are designed to be obnoxious—they’re supposed to cut through background noise to tell inattentive drivers and pedestrians to make way for the emergency vehicle coming through. And in most places, they do a fine job. Here in NYC, though, heavy traffic means first responders use them constantly. As a result, sirens become so ubiquitous, they often go unnoticed—or even, on occasion, enjoyed. People talking to themselves Everybody talks to themselves sometimes—but there’s a big difference between rehearsing what you’re gonna say to your office crush under your breath and that guy on the subway rambling on a

25 fantastic things to do this week

25 fantastic things to do this week

Monday 21 Origami Holiday Tree American Museum of Natural History; Dec 21–Jan 10, 10am; suggested donation $19, seniors and students $14.50, children 2–12 $10.50This UWS institution's holiday evergreen sticks around into the second week of 2016, but c'mon, go see it before Christmas. Festooned with more than 500 hand-folded paper ornaments, the tree is inspired by the museum’s “The Power of Poison” exhibit, meaning you’ll spot toxic mushrooms, poison ivy, spiders and jellyfish.  Santastical Clemente Soto Velez Cultural and Educational Center; Dec 21–24, times vary; $20–$40Put a little spice in your Yuletime with a trip through this zany holiday house, which offers up a very adult-themed twist on everyone's favorite Christmas traditions. There's an interactive nativity, a fake skating rink, a forest of mistletoe—but the piĂšce de rĂ©sistance comes at the end, when you have to choose which of the weird Santas you want to have your picture taken with. Sexy Mrs. Claus? Black Santa? Bernie Santas? Good luck deciding. Works & Process at the Guggenheim: Holiday Concert Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; 7pm; $8–$40Add a little bit of class to your Christmas week by heading over to Frank Lloyd Wright's circular museum to hear George Steel conduct the Vox Vocal Ensemble through a performance of holiday music. If you're looking to do it on the cheap, wear comfy shoes; standing tickets are a lot less expensive than ones that score you a seat. Klea Blackhurst, Jim Caruso and Billy Stritch: A Sw

25 excellent things to do this weekend

25 excellent things to do this weekend

Dec 11 ¡PRESENTE! The Young Lords in New York El Museo del Barrio; 11am; freeFrom the late ’60s through the ’70s, Spanish Harlem was watched over by the Young Lords Organization, a collective of Puerto Rican community members who assembled to improve the lives of their neighbors. Learn about the group’s cultural legacy at this visually striking exhibit which includes photos of the Young Lords in action and archived issues from their weekly newspaper, Palante.   Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Dec 11–13, times vary; $35In what might be the finest narrator Prokofiev's tale has found since David Bowie recorded it, fashion designer and general dandy Isaac Mizrahi reads Peter and the Wolf, abetted by the excellent Ensemble Signal and John Heginbotham's choreography. Glow-in-the-dark Chanukah Dinner 92nd Street Y; 6pm; $30Grab a flashlight and a yarmulke for this celebration of the Jewish Festival of Lights. Latkes and other traditional Hanukkah dishes are served by the light of the menorah and glow sticks. The night’s festivities also include live music and singing.  Henry IV St. Ann's Warehouse, Brooklyn; Dec 11–13, times vary; $50–$70It's your final weekend to see this groundbreaking production (where Shakespeare's play is actually a show-within-the-show, set inside a women's prison) at the new-and-improved DUMBO performance space. If you've been meaning to check it out, do it now. Z100's Jingle Ball 2015 Madison Square Garden; 7:30pm; $51–$351I

25 super-sweet things to do this weekend

25 super-sweet things to do this weekend

December 4 Fashion Underground: The World of Susanne Bartsch The Museum at FIT ; Dec 4–5, times vary; freeCatch this exhibition on nightlife legend and Haute Couture diva Susanne Bartsch while you can; there are few opportunities to see 80 of her most iconic looks in person. You'll be able to gag over custom looks by designers like The Blonds, Alexander McQueen, Vivienne Westwood and Jean Paul Gaultier. Step into the shoes of one the city's most creative gals-about-town. Crafts at the Cathedral Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine; Dec 4–6, times vary; $6, weekend pass $7Now in its 17th year, this annual holiday artisan market, held at the palatial Cathedral of St. John the Divine, provides a space for more than 60 local crafters to hawk their handmade wares. All admission proceeds go toward the Cathedral and its programs. Neko Case + Sþren Juul Apollo Theatre, 7pm; $40, at the door $45Neko Case, a razor-sharp alt-country songwriter with a golden voice, headlines this night at the Apollo Theater (moved from its previous date at the Brooklyn Masonic Temple). She released her last solo album, The Worse Things Get, the Harder I Fight, the Harder I Fight, the More I Love You, in 2013 (yeah, it’s a mouthful), and it’s every bit as knockout ambitious as the defiant title suggests. Baby Jane Dexter: It's Personal! Metropolitan Room; 7pm; $25 plus two-drink minimumNightclub legend Baby Jane Dexter connects with each song on a visceral level; if you’ve got the balls to join a red-h

25 awesome things to do this week

25 awesome things to do this week

November 30 Get Your Knit On with Wool and the Gang Tutu's, Brooklyn; 5pm; $45–$50Knitting newbies and longtime woolites can join hands and needles at this night of yarn, alcohol and new friends. Get your hands on Crazy Sexy Wool and learn new user-friendly knitting techniques while you chat with the crew from Wool and the Gang. You'll walk away with a soft and fluffy piece of your own, along with a new obsession. 16th Annual Winter's Eve Broadway between Columbus Circle and W 68th St; 5:30pm; freeRing in December with this annual tree-lighting ceremony and New York's largest holiday festival. Along with the arboreal illumination in Dante Park (Broadway at 63rd St), catch live performances, ice-sculpting demonstrations, circus performers and tastings (only $1–$4) from more than 30 Lincoln Square restaurants. Glen Hansard Various locations; times vary; $45Glen Hansard is known for his work in gentle, folky Irish band the Frames, the Swell Season and—of course—from the hit movie-musical Once. Tonight the troubadour plugs his second solo album, Didn't He Ramble. Featuring a host of collaborators including Iron & Wine's Sam Beam, the album retains the singer's history of elegant subtlety while adding horn and string instrumentation to the pensive mix. Lesli Margherita: Broad Birdland; 7pm; $30–$40 plus $10 minimumLesli Margherita is not a fan of the small gesture. Currently swanning nastily in the retro Broadway musical Dames at Sea, she goes solo tonight with a collection of sex

25 excellent things to do this weekend

25 excellent things to do this weekend

November 20 Carol opens in theaters You'll definitely want to catch director Todd Haynes's beautiful exploration of forbidden lesbian love in midcentury America—it's all but guaranteed to lock up plenty of Oscar nods. Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara light up the screen with their performances as the two leading ladies who struggle to express their feelings.  The Night Before opens in theatersIf your taste in cinema runs more toward the comedic than the dramatic, then this delightfully over-the-top holiday laugh-fest—starring Seth Rogen, Anthony Mackie and Joseph Gordon-Levitt—will probably be right up your alley. Spoiler alert: There will be drug humor. Nerd Nite Littlefield, Brooklyn; 7:30pm; $10–$14Braininess meets booziness at this monthly lecture series, where intelligent people talk about ridiculous-yet-educational subjects. This installment features talks on bedbugs, the history of James Bond gadgets, and why people like big boobs. The Wonderful World of Boning Union Hall, Brooklyn; 7:30pm; $8Relive those halcyon days of your life when sex was a weird, alien thing at this comedy show, where Lux Alptraum, Tiara Francis and Rojo Perez show off old-school sex videos that will take you back to the humor in humping.  The Hip Hop Nutcracker United Palace Theater; November 20 at 8pm, November 21 at 2pm; $10–$100If the Tchaikovsky ballet always seemed a little outdated to you, this modernized hip-hop update might be just what you've been looking for. It's only in town for two pe

26 fantastic things to do this week

26 fantastic things to do this week

November 23 Turkeys for Thanksgiving BAM Rose Cinemas; Nov 23–27, times vary; $14Not that you needed an excuse to watch some of Hollywood's biggest failures, but if you catch them at BAM, you'll see them the way they were meant to be seen: by paying theatergoers. Hit the link to see which movies are playing when, but we have to recommend Southland Tales on Nov 23.  "Through the Eyes of the Homeless" Department of Homeless Services; 9am; freeBy having their photographers collaborate with the city's homeless population, Heart Gallery NYC has helped create a remarkable look at the city through the eyes of the less fortunate. It's both incredible art, and a reminder of everything to be thankful for.  "Dear Christy: The Christy Brown Collection" American Irish Historical Society; Nov 23–24, noon–5pm; $10No discredit to Daniel Day-Lewis, but My Left Foot memoirist Christy Brown's life was so incredible, it's worth looking at beyond the big-screen version. Catch this exhibition featuring never-before-seen work by the author and painter before it closes on Tuesday. Swing Dancing and Lindy Hop Workshop Q.E.D., Queens; 6:30pm, 7:10pm; $13–$15Start out the (short) week on a fun note at this definitely-for-beginners dance class, where you'll learn the basics of some of the Roaring Twenties' most popular dance moves. Hey, if it was good enough for Grandma, it's good enough for us. Celebrity Autobiography Stage 72; 7pm; $40–$80 plus two-drink minimumWhat's better than reading a famous pers