Thinking The Museum: Egyptian Mummies Now And Then

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Thinking The Museum: Egyptian Mummies Now And Then
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Washington University Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts says
This new series features curators and educators from the Kemper Art Museum in conversation with nationally renowned scholars and museum professionals. Programs will focus on a wide range of museum-centered topics, including curating exhibitions and collecting artworks. What are the challenges, limitations, and cultural values of museums in the 21st century? How are museum professionals rethinking the institution and their own practices? What is the particular role of a university museum? These and other questions will be discussed in a conversational atmosphere in the Museum’s atrium.

The first program in this ongoing series, Egyptian Mummies Now and Then, will focus on three ancient Egyptian mummies, two owned by the Museum and one owned by the Saint Louis Art Museum. These mummies were recently transported to Barnes-Jewish Hospital where a team of Washington University radiologists preformed computerized tomography, or CT, scans on them. The discussion will revolve around the scientific insights gained from this advanced technology and the ethical concerns of the original and religious meanings of mummies. In addition, this program will inquire into how the mummies might function today as artworks, removed from their original context and site.

Participants include:

Karen K. Butler, associate curator, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum

Lisa Çakmak, assistant curator of ancient art, Saint Louis Art Museum

David Friedel, professor of archaeology, Department of Anthropology in Arts & Sciences

Vincent Mellnick, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine

Thinking the Museum: Egyptian Mummies Now and Then will be moderated by Sabine Eckmann, director and chief curator, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.

Image credit: Photo by Robert Boston.
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