News / City Life

After cherry blossoms: other spring flowers to see in and around Tokyo right now

Nemophilia Hitachi Seaside Park
Photo: hitachikaihin.jp

Sakura season may be over in Tokyo, but that doesn't mean the flower gazing ends here. Luckily enough, Japan is home to many a bloom with different flowers popping up each and every season.

Nemophila

One eye-catching spring bloomer that seems to be garnering quite the attention on social media is the pretty blue nemophila, otherwise known as 'baby blue eyes'.

Nemophila are especially eye-catching in Fukuoka's Uminonakamichi Seaside Park, where the blue flowers are blooming right next to the pink cherry blossoms. However, you can also see them around Tokyo. The best place to catch these blue flowers is at the Hitachi Seaside Park in Ibaraki, located about 90 minutes by train from Shinagawa Station. Currently, the flowers are just starting to bloom, but you can keep track of the progress on the park's official website here. This park also has fields of tulips, narcissus and Christmas roses, but the best time to head over is between mid-April and early May to catch the sea of blue nemophila.

Shibazakura 

Also known as 'pink moss', this pretty floral 'carpet' comes around every spring, covering the grounds in a blanket of purple, pink and white florals. 

 

Shibazakura at Hitsujiyama Park in Chichibu, Saitama

 

The top two destinations to see these flowers are the Fuji Motosuko Resort during the annual Fuji Shibazakura Festival (the view of Mount Fuji in the background is an added bonus), and the Hitsujiyama Park in Chichibu, Saitama. Best head there towards the end of April and early May, when most of the flowers are at their peak bloom. You can follow the live camera footage of the Fuji Shibazakura Festival here to help you plan the best time to visit.

Azaleas

A more common flower found within Tokyo, azaleas are scattered all over the city from sidewalk bushes to parks dedicated to this colourful flora. Azaleas start blooming as early as mid-April and last until the beginning of May (pending weather, of course), and they make for gorgeous photo ops. 

 

Bunkyo Azalea Festival at Nezu Shrine

 

A great spot to catch these colourful bushes is at Nezu Shrine's Bunkyo Azalea Festival. The park is home to 3,000-odd azalea plants, with roughly 100 varieties in total. The festival also has a number of food stalls, performances and activities throughout the fest, making it a fun day out with the family.

If you're still keen on seeing the cherry blossoms, you'll find them in other parts of Japan. Just follow our guide here

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