Trek Talks: Mae Jemison On Star Trek And The Future

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Trek Talks: Mae Jemison On Star Trek And The Future
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Trek Talks: Mae Jemison On Star Trek And The Future says
See astronaut, physician, and chemical engineer Dr. Mae Jemison discuss how sci-fi as can carve out a space for often-excluded voices, on Monday, December 5, in an onstage conversation.

Head here for more infomartin: tiff.net/events/trek-talks-mae-jemison-on-star-trek-and-the-future

While Star Trek was set 300 years in the future, it was quite intentionally a reflection of the social and political issues of 1960s America. Using the science-fiction form as a vehicle to explore themes of cultural identity, diversity and tolerance, Gene Roddenberry and his collaborators offered commentary on issues such as feminism, environmentalism, and race relations. (The series has the famous distinction of airing the first interracial kiss on television, when Uhura and Captain Kirk locked lips in the episode "Plato’s Stepchildren.")

The progressive values underlying Trek, and the series’ attempts to grapple with problems that remain pressing to this day, continue to resonate not only with fans, but with scientists, social justice advocates, politicians, activists, educators, and artists alike. In the face of such fraught contemporary issues as widespread migration and displacement, racially motivated killings, and LGBTQ human rights, the utopic promise of Star Trek — not only its vision for a future founded on justice and equality, but its use of popular media to bring such issues into mainstream discussion — is all the more inspiring, and vital.
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By: TIFF