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Our guide to Frieze London and Frieze Masters

The Time Out Art team's expert guide to London's most important art fairs

Frieze is back for a 13th year, with 160 galleries from over 25 different countries gathering in Regent's Park on October 14-17 2015 for the biggest contemporary art event of the year. 2013's fair saw a redesign which featured more sizeable public areas, plus the return of the Frieze Sculpture Park. Find out more on our Frieze Art Fair listing. The Frieze Art Fair is at the south end of Regent's Park. Take the Bakerloo Line to Regent's Park tube station, cross to the north side of Marylebone Road and walk down Park Square West, at the end of which you will find the entrance to the fair.

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Frieze London

Critics' choice

The biggest contemporary carnival in London’s art calendar hits its thirteenth year in 2015. With last year's redesign and rebranding (now Frieze London), the fair returns to the south end of Regent's Park with 160 international galleries from over 25 countries exhibiting special presentations and emerging talent. Annual highlight include the Frieze Projects, Focus section of the fair and the Sculpture Park.

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Regent's Park, Regent's Park Wednesday October 14 2015 - Saturday October 17 2015

Frieze Masters

Critics' choice

While Frieze London sells work made mostly after 2000, this sister fair, now in its fourth year, features over 130 international galleries selling high-end art made from the ancient era to the end of the twentieth century.

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Regent's Park, Regent's Park Wednesday October 14 2015 - Sunday October 18 2015

Find more art fairs in London

Art fairs in London

You might be just browsing, you might have a collection to start; however big your artistic interests there's a London art fair that will catch your eye.
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Where to eat near the Frieze Art Fair

The Providores & Tapa Room

Peter Gordon is on a roll. His funky, relaxed fusion café and restaurant Kopapa has been going great guns, and summer 2013 saw him taking the famous Sugar Club kitchen back to his native New Zealand for a starry hotel launch. None of this has taken the shine off The Providores & Tapa Room, his flagship Marylebone project.

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Marylebone

Honey & Co

A bijou delight, Honey & Co has a floor tiled in ivory and indigo mosaic. Its walls hold shelves of own-made pastries and jewel-like jars of preserves. The small tables and chairs are packed closely together; there are only 20 covers, so finding a spare seat at short notice is rare. The kitchen is run by an accomplished Israeli husband-and-wife team: he trained in Tel Aviv, she worked at Ottolenghi and NOPI. This pedigree shows up in a daily changing menu that draw influences from across the Middle East. 

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Fitzrovia

Galvin Bistrot de Luxe

Critics' choice

The first of the Galvin brothers’ restaurant empire, this polished, much-loved Marylebone bistro is classically French (veloutés, soufflés, purées) with the occasional nod to Italy (risottos, lasagnes, panna cottas). The dining room is an inviting place and lunch from the à la carte and £19.50 prix-fixe menus is high on comfort.

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Marylebone

The Attendant

Venue says: 10% off evening hire at Attendant when you quote 'Time Out'! Email info@the-attendant.com for more information.

Opened in January 2013, Attendant occupies London’s most original location for a coffee bar: a late-nineteenth-century gents’ toilet. The urinals provide seating with small tables, and there’s additional seating at a banquette at the back. Be warned: this place is tiny, and rammed at a weekday lunchtime. But that was the only problem apparent. 

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Fitzrovia
See more places to eat near the Frieze Art Fair

Read the latest art features

Art fairs in London

Our guide to London art fairs and what you can expect to find at them. Mid-October is the busiest time of year for art buying in London, but check back all year round for more events.

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'Soundscapes' at the National Gallery: your ultimate guide

This season, the galleries in the National Gallery's Sainsbury Wing will be offering a feast for the ears as well as the eye as the likes of musician/producer Jamie XX, Turner Prize winner Susan Philipsz and Oscar-winning film composer Gabriel Yared curate one-off soundtracks to paintings from the collection.

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By: Elizabeth Darke

'Joseph Cornell: Wanderlust' at Royal Academy of Arts: a preview

Although he never ventured beyond New York State, the American artist Joseph Cornell (1903-72) toured the world, travelled across time, encountered different cultures and even embarked on space expeditions. All through his intriguing and complex shadow boxes – glass-fronted cases containing arrangements of the objects and images he amassed. 

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By: Freire Barnes

London art college degree shows

Find the art stars of tomorrow graduating from London's top art and design colleges. Highlights this year include Free Range at the Truman Brewery, Camberwell ILlustration at Off-site venue, Hoxton Arches and Goldsmtihs Postgraduates.

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The Serpentine Pavilion: which is your favourite?

The task of transforming the lawn outside the Serpentine Gallery with a multi-purpose temporary Pavilion isn't an easy one. There's the pressure to think of something new, the pressure to think of something interesting and the pressure to not totally balls things up like back in 2004, when the Pavilion plans proved too advanced and too intricate to physically pull off. This year's challenge falls on the Spanish architectural duo SelgasCano, who have delivered a multi-coloured, angled Pavilion. We're asking you to pick your favourite Serpentine Pavilion from years gone bys

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By: Elizabeth Darke

Comments

1 comments
DMC London
DMC London

Road Cone Gonks They say that “Art is for everyone , but my experience of the Frieze on Sunday was more that “Anyone can be an artist”. In a veritable smorgasbord of styles, sizes and thought provoking oddities it seemed that most nations and most genres were on offer at one of the biggest collections of modern art and sculpture that one could wish to see. At £35.00 for standard tickets, it was a little bit steep, but for those on a budget, the open air ( and free of charge) sculpture garden within one corner of Regents Park was a good alternative. Within the marquees, the first and most eye catching collection had to be ( for me at least) the collection of 17 care worn traffic cones, fresh from service on a local motorway to have the “red carpet” treatment as conduits for the fickle flow of public opinion. Bedecked with what I am old enough to term “Gonks” ( anyone who was a kid in Britain in the 70’s will know what I mean) the cones were transformed with the addition of little capes, little travelling creatures, long hair and smiles to create a fun space and atmosphere of creative craziness. Croatian artist Vlado Martek cleverly recycled jeans and trouser fabric pockets to create intimate spaces within which to display his poetry and creative writing. Using different styles of media, the mounted messages were profoundly personal yet also quirkily quaint. I felt compelled to “steal” the letters and furtively read them…perhaps this was the main point ? I tried hard to get excited by “Eggs – White” and “Truck Doors – Closed” but my marrow and soul were neither moved nor stirred. Moby Dick, complete with grinning teeth and suspension ropes was, on the other hand and inspired artistic rendition of a literary classic hybridised with the concept of the old school gymnasium vaulting horse. Whilst Eduardo Basualdo’s “Theory” ( or in my own words “Big Black Rock on Rope”) was startling and strangely mesmeric. Apparently a newly commissioned work, created from black aluminium foil for the main part of the piece ( the “rock”) with a small framed drawing sitting in its shadow ( literally as well as metaphorically). The pamphlet accompanying Mr Basualdo’s work claimed that his installations and other works “evoke theoretical reflections that start from deep subconscious impulses”. I agree. I don’t know why, but then is that not part of the mystery of art ? Other reflections, of a more distinctly physical kind, created nausea and wonderment in equal measure for those brave enough to enter the window whorl, created from multiple reflecting arcs of Perspex or some other type of plastic or plasticized “glass-like” material. At the end of the tunnel a visual reflection unlike a mirror astounded the viewer by creating a non-reverse image. Quite quite weird, but wonderful ! And for anyone who got bored with the art…well the people watching was almost as educational and stimulating to the senses !