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Eddy Frankel

Eddy Frankel

Eddy Frankel is Time Out London's Art & Culture Editor. He joined Time Out way back in 2014 as a lowly listings writer and has somehow survived, like an artsy cockroach. His whole schtick is writing simply about complicated art, and has used the word 'boner' at least eight times in eight separate art reviews. Something he's very proud of, for some reason. What he lacks in maturity, he more than makes up for in his ability to wear shorts long into the winter months.

Connect with him on Twitter @eddyfrankel or Instagram @eddyfuckingfrankel

Articles (77)

Top 10 art exhibitions in London

Top 10 art exhibitions in London

London’s major galleries and museums are all open as usual, but check on the galleries’ websites before visiting, you may need to book a slot in advance. This city is absolutely rammed full of amazing art galleries and museums. Want to see a priceless Monet? A Rothko masterpiece? An installation of little crumpled bits of paper? A video piece about the evils of capitalism? You can find it all right here. Post-Covid, London’s museums are all back to normal, and the city’s independents have been back in business for ages. So here, we've got your next art outing sorted with the ten best shows you absolutely can't miss. 

11 London art exhibitions we can’t wait to see in summer 2022

11 London art exhibitions we can’t wait to see in summer 2022

London’s art museums and galleries kicked back into life in early 2022 with a brilliant series of exhibitions, including big hitters like ‘Francis Bacon: Man and Beast’ at the Royal Academy and Hew Locke’s wild carnival installation at Tate Britain. But the summer is looking just as good. Whether you’re after ecological explorations, immersive environments, classic modern painting or just an exploding shed, summer 2022 has got some art for everyone.

Nine art exhibitions we can’t wait to see in early 2022

Nine art exhibitions we can’t wait to see in early 2022

After two years of delays and cancellations, London’s museums and galleries look like they’re gunning for a year of full-force, all-out, no-holds-barred art in 2022. We’ve already had our first proper blockbuster in what feels like forever thanks to the five-star extravaganza that is ‘Francis Bacon: Man and Beast’ at the Royal Academy, and there’s even more to get excited about in the coming months. Whether you fancy a critical look at sex work at the ICA, an exploration of international surrealism at the Tate, or an exploded shed by Cornelia Parker, early 2022 is going to provide a feast for the eyes. 

NFTs are art at its dullest – but in 2022 that might all change

NFTs are art at its dullest – but in 2022 that might all change

NFTs were everywhere in 2021, a metaphorical plague to accompany the literal one we were all dealing with. They were ubiquitous, hyped, and very annoying. Non Fungible Token? More like No F’in Thanks.  But they’re here, and they’re here to stay, so let’s do a little primer, because NFTs are a complicated, convoluted mess of a concept. A large part of that is by design – artists and investors want their thing to feel special, unique, alluring. Creating an impenetrable linguistic framework is part of the propaganda of art.  But it’s actually fairly simple. For a start, an NFT in itself is not art. An NFT is a contract, which you can use to sell art. Let’s say you have an image you’ve made, and you want to make some money off it. You can create an NFT to function as a traceable contract for the image, proving who made it, and showing who bought it. The image itself is just an image, the NFT is the contract that’s created and exchanged to prove ownership of the image. MORE 2022 TRENDS:🚆 Why train travel is going to be on your 2022 bucket list🌳 From parklets to urban forests: how cities will get a whole lot greener in 2022🧙 Why 2022 is going to be the biggest ever year for fantasy on screen But people are constantly talking about NFTs as if they’re art, rather than contracts for art. So is there an NFT aesthetic? Yes, definitely. And when people talk about NFTs as if they are works of art in their own right, they’re often talking about things like CryptoKitties or Bored Ape, c

Unmissable Galleries: The Perimeter

Unmissable Galleries: The Perimeter

What makes it so special? This beautiful mews house near King’s Cross has been converted into a miniature museum, designed to showcase the art collection of Alexander Petalas. He puts on two shows a year and lets us grubby members of the public swan about the gaff (shoes off though, so wear your nicest socks) and ogle his wares. Considering it’s a totally domestic setting, this is as far removed from your granny’s living room as you can get. We’re talking cast concrete floors and swooping staircases, here. Real nice stuff. What’s on show? It opened in 2018, and past shows have included ceramics by Ron Nagle, paintings by Carmen Herrera and a group show of paintings by young black artists. Right now, there’s a whole show dedicated to Sarah Lucas, one-time YBA and now one of the UK’s most important and influential living artists. There are glistening bronzes, cast resin toilets, blobby soft constructions and some melons for boobs. It’s some seriously classic Sarah Lucas, which is a surprisingly rare thing to find in London. How do I get in?  It’s free to visit, you just have to book via www.theperimeter.co.uk. There are also guided tours – usually led by Petalas himself – every Thursday. RECOMMENDED: Discover more venues you’ve never been to in London.

The 50 best art galleries in London

The 50 best art galleries in London

Art plays an essential role in London’s unparalleled and inimitable culture scene. It’s one of the city’s greatest and most vibrant creative scenes, and you can see it almost everywhere. There are an estimated 1,500 permanent exhibition spaces in the capital, most of them free. Whether you’re looking for contemporary or classical, modernism or old masters, there’s a gallery catering to your next art outing. But after you’ve exhausted the latest art exhibitions in London, choosing a gallery can be tricky business. So we’ve created a shortlist of all the London galleries you need to visit. Organised by size and including institutions like the National Gallery and independent stalwarts like the White Cube, we present the 50 best galleries in London.  RECOMMENDED: All the best art, reviews and listings in London.

17 autumn art exhibitions in London we can’t wait to see

17 autumn art exhibitions in London we can’t wait to see

The end of summer is a quiet time in art, everyone’s off sunning themselves in Saint-Tropez or drinking champers with curators called Klaus in Lake Como or something. But come September, it’s back to business, and the exhibition schedule this autumn is looking pretty damn snazzy. From big famous names to relative unknowns, huge paintings to little immersive installations, the art shows taking place this autumn are going to be worth putting on a jumper and finally leaving the house for.

The return of figurative painting

The return of figurative painting

Painting has always happened. Other art trends might come and go – big conceptual installations, video, performance art, ceramics – but figurative painting always ticks along in the background, bobbing in and out of fashion across the years. And right now, it’s big. The Hayward Gallery’s major autumn exhibition, ‘Mixing it Up: Painting Today’, proves it: this sprawling exhibition of contemporary painters working in the UK isn't all big names and art megastars, instead, most of the wall space is given over to young, relatively-undiscovered artists from across the country. It’s a celebration of painting’s enduring staying power, and it’s brilliant. Painting has been around for so long that anyone working in the medium today has to acknowledge its past  Those younger artists are the most exciting bit of the show, and they are just the tip of the figurative painting iceberg. Gareth Cadwallader, Issy Wood, Somaya Critchlow and Lydia Blakeley are just some of the London artists on display. Then over at GCCA in New Cross there’s a brilliant show of Olivia Sterling’s beautiful, humorous, political canvases, and down in Brixton, you’ll find Dale Lewis’s big paintings of gory everyday life at Block 336. Olivia Sterling Those are just the artists with big shows, we haven’t even spoken about artists like Luke Burton, Shadi Al Atallah, Marcus Nelson, etc. etc. etc. The list is seriously long. All these artists mine the history of painting - it’s impossible not to, painting has been aro

How to get into open-world video games

How to get into open-world video games

It’s hard to imagine how a functioning, healthy adult human can fit video games into their life in normal times. Between work, exercise, commuting, going to the pub and having to pretend to be interested when your partner tells you about their day at the office, you don’t have a lot of spare time for killing Nazis or hunting zombies. But lockdown has changed all that, and video-game sales have gone through the roof. As lockdown comes back for another swipe at your freedoms, you might be considering filling your evenings with Xbox instead of Netflix, so here’s a little primer on the most immersive gaming out there: open worlds. Where would you rather be: stuck in your damp flat in Barnet or sweating in ancient Greece? Exactly. This isn’t the rigid platformer of your youth, there are no levels or even set tasks, necessarily. Instead, you get a whole world to explore, with no walls or barriers to where you can go. It makes for a seriously absorbing experience when done well, halfway between a film and a ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ novel – and you are totally in charge. ‘Red Dead Redemption 2’, the biggest hit of the past few years, has you playing a cowboy meandering around the Wild West. It’s popular and very beautifully made, but it’s also painfully slow. Maybe hours of horse husbandry is your thing, maybe it’s not. My little pony – ‘Read Dead Redemption 2’. Photograph: Rockstar Games. Games like ‘Assassin’s Creed Origins’ and its follow-up, ‘Odyssey’, place you in ancient wor

The 24 best weed songs ever

The 24 best weed songs ever

Weed, pot, herb, bud, dope, skunk, hash, ganja, marijuana, indo, cheeba, chronic, dank, spliff… it's been celebrated for hundreds of years, under hundreds of names. No wonder hundreds of musicians have written songs in its illicit honour too. From reefer-puffing jazz pianists through red-eyed rockers and ripped rappers, right up to the bong-toking skate-punks of the 2010s, weed's been the catalsyt for all sorts of great music. We're not advocating drug use, obviously, but if you are getting blazed on 4/20 (a day traditionally associated with getting mellow) here's your ideal soundtrack. Did we miss out your favourite? Let us know in the comments box below or tweet us at @TimeOutMusic.

6 art exhibitions worth leaving London for

6 art exhibitions worth leaving London for

It’s hard to believe, but there is stuff to do outside of London. And not just stuff like walks in big fields and going to a Harvester, but, like, culture and art and junk. The UK is full of incredible museums and art spaces, all within pretty easy reach of the capital, so here are six shows that are definitely worth getting on a train for. 

Os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre

Os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre

O potencial cinematográfico (e não só) da ficção científica é quase infinito. É nestes filmes que os nossos maiores pesadelos podem tornar-se realidade e os nossos sonhos concretizar-se, ao mesmo tempo que é dito e posto em causa algo sobre o nosso presente. E o género sempre fez as delícias do público, desde o tempo dos efeitos especiais básicos e rudimentares dos filmes mudos ao excesso digital dos blockbusters contemporâneos. Hoje, no entanto, é a própria crítica quem aplaude e celebra muitos destes filmes, tal como acontece com os super-heróis e o terror. A pensar nisso, elegemos os 100 melhores filmes de ficção científica de sempre. Recomendado: Filmes em cartaz esta semana

Listings and reviews (270)

Future Shock

Future Shock

4 out of 5 stars

They’re just showing off at this point, the folks behind 180 The Strand. They’ve got the cavernous space, they’ve got the mind-bending artists, and they’ve got the experience of putting on the best immersive art exhibitions in London over the past decade. They don’t even need to try. But they’re doing it anyway. And this new show is peak 180. It’s room after room of dizzying technological AV wonders that will clog your Instagram feed for months. The most effective installations are the ones that emphasise physical sensation. Returning stars UVA (they had a solo show here a few years back) trip you up with lights that bisect the space, slicing through the room and leaving you feeling like you’re melting through the floor. Nonotak try to give you seizures with strobing cubes of light, Hamill Industries send waves of smoke pulsing at you, Tundra chop you up with holograms.  Then you get Gaika’s brilliantly, threateningly intense robo-installation, Weirdcore’s room of coloured ribbons and throbbing lights – soundtracked by Richard D James aka Aphex Twin – which feels like being stuck inside a psychedelic computer, and Ben Kelly’s room of gyrating totems and columns that look like Brancusi raving at the Haçienda, which makes sense, because Ben Kelly designed the Haçienda.  It’s not that the other works here – the films and clever AI installations – aren’t good, it’s just that they get lost in the maelstrom of experiential art.  So what’s this show about, what’s the big conceptual

Andreas Gursky

Andreas Gursky

4 out of 5 stars

Size matters in art. A few hundred years ago, the only subjects you were allowed to paint really big were scenes from the bible or history. Big meant important, it meant special.  German photographer Andreas Gursky works on a ‘history painting’ scale, creating vast, brain-bending, eye-twisting, perfect images, but what he captures isn’t biblical or of much historical importance, his is the art of the endless everyday, of the mundane juggernaut of normal life. The first work here is a huge photo of people standing on snowy fields and skating on a frozen river. Each one of the hundreds of people here is totally focused on themselves, on their exercise, their play, their conversations. But in this modern, Breughel-like landscape, you see that they’re all part of a mass; individual cells in a vast organism. They all feel unique and special, but they aren’t.  Next there are photos of models on a catwalk, all forced into near-identical outfits with their near-identical faces, all in a manipulated, mediated version of ideal beauty. There’s a photo of German politicians arranged like ‘The Last Supper’, a terrifyingly enormous cruise ship with its countless cabins, a crowd at a gig, the hoardings of a bank building, a display of Apple products. One jaw dropping photo shows a professional ski run, its slope empty, big screens showing the moment of a crash. Everything here is spectacle, it’s all specks of humanity engaging in capitalism, desperate for diversion, but getting totally lost

Walter Sickert

Walter Sickert

5 out of 5 stars

Walter Sickert is disintegrating. He’s melting into nothing, disappearing right in front of you in a staggeringly good, muddy, sombre early self-portrait from 1896. This neatly encapsulates what makes the English painter (1860-1942) so interesting: it’s not his handling of paint or how he captures light or anything, it’s the bubbling undercurrent of darkness that courses through his work. Because where the impressionists and their successors exalted in the effects of natural light, found ecstasy in the beauty of nature (easy enough when you live in the South of France instead of north London), Sickert’s work is caked in the filth and thick smog of the city, the grime and decay of Camden. This show of art from across his long career takes in portraiture, landscapes, urban scenes, nudes and a whole bunch of murder. His early work owes hefty debts to his mentors James Whistler and Edgar Degas. He took the muted tones of the former, and the fascination with everyday life from the latter.  It’s deliberately provocative and disconcertingly morbid Sickert, a former actor, repeatedly paints the stages and music halls he loved. There are actors frozen in searingly bright spotlights, draped in luminescent red and white dresses, trapeze artists caught mid-flight, singers caught mid-song. So far, so Degas, but the real gold is in the crowds. Sickert’s masses of rapt bodies are trapped in the gloom, shadowy observers that smudge into one another, becoming big anonymous, amorphous globs o

Seth Price: ‘Art is Not Human‘

Seth Price: ‘Art is Not Human‘

4 out of 5 stars

The human eye is desperate for patterns and familiarity, we seek out the recognisable, it’s what the brain wants. And Seth Price does not care.  The New York-based artist’s latest series of paintings is an experiment in diving as deep as possible into the uncanny valley. He first paints on canvas, then takes a photo of the painting and manipulates it digitally, then reprints it back on itself. The result is big glossy paintings smeared with bright paint, all overlaid with perfectly rendered 3D objects. A smudged woman’s face smiles out at you from one work, with two neat, cold, golden metal cylinders leering out of the canvas above her. Text is reflected in the metal in another, or a man’s face, or just globs of paint. Each painting is reflecting and distorting bits of itself.  The result is that you as a viewer spend your time trying to untie the physical from the digital, attempting to figure out what's 'really' painted and what's printed. It's like spotting shapes in clouds, or looking for figurative elements in abstraction. Our eyes really want that meaning, and in Price's work that desperation becomes a hunt for the physical in a world that has become indecipherably digital.  There’s a bit of a whiff of big trophy art for rich bankers to the whole thing, but Price’s art is clever, pretty and it makes your brain ache a little bit. Uncanny.

Everlyn Nicodemus

Everlyn Nicodemus

4 out of 5 stars

Trauma weighs heavy on the body. Everlyn Nicodemus knows that feeling well. After years of enduring racist abuse and humiliation across Europe, the African artist suffered a breakdown, a brutal experience she describes as near-death. The works in this show are how she fought to reclaim her identity, her body and her sense of self. It starts with 12 bare, monochrome, almost-identical images of two figures in a room. They’re stood in silhouette, the atmosphere is menacing and suffocating. The series is called ‘The Widow and the Shadow’, which implies that the threat here is from grief itself, ever-present and looming, but this feels somehow more violent than that.  There’s a recent series of collages on display showing figures dancing across pages of French poetry, but the real heart of the show is ‘The Wedding’, a collection of bright, primary coloured self-portraits from 1991 to 1992, right after her breakdown. They’re big, bold things, filled with vast patches of flat red and blue, with black faces emerging out of the colour. They nod heavily to Matisse and Picasso, but these aren’t just art-historical exercises, they’re private, personal outpourings of unbridled emotion. This is a black woman finding her feet again after untold pain, figuring herself out in paint. I don’t think they’re all great paintings, but each one is undeniably, beautifully moving.

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster: ‘Alienarium 5’

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster: ‘Alienarium 5’

4 out of 5 stars

Turns out, aliens stink. And they’re hairy too. You can see for yourself, because there’s one here at the Serpentine. You peek through a little peephole in the wall and there it is in the dark, a gargantuan hirsute apparition on an undulating golden carpet, its scent wafting through the space, a heady mixture of wood, metal, dust and sweat. This is Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster’s guest, dropping down to earth to visit her purpose-built ‘alienarium’, an environment in which to imagine future encounters with new alien species. The central space is covered by a mural, a ‘Sgt Pepper’-style collage of sci-fi and art figures. You spot David Bowie, Yayoi Kusama and Tilda Swinton in among the satellites, spaceships and portraits of sci-fi authors. Strewn on the floor are cushions covered with the artwork of classic sci-fi novels by brilliant writers like Ursula K Le Guin, John Brunner, Joanna Russ and Stanislaw Lem. I’d love to say I thought there was some big overarching concept at play here, but really this just feels like a super-nerdy, ultra-passionate love letter to science fiction, to its power to make you consider new ideas, imagine new futures and hope for new outcomes. And it’s great: an intense trip into Gonzalez-Foerster’s passion for the genre. There’s a creature floating past you made of millions of luminescent filaments undulating in the vacuum There’s a VR element to the show too, which places visitors inside an alien body, staring out through space at other species.

Olivia Sterling: ‘Manslaughter’

Olivia Sterling: ‘Manslaughter’

4 out of 5 stars

‘I eat pieces of shit like you for breakfast.’ ‘...you eat pieces of shit for breakfast?’ It’s an appropriate quote (from cultural milestone ‘Happy Gilmore’) for this show of new paintings by young English artist Olivia Sterling, because every work here is about devouring men. Specifically, white ones.  In the first big canvas you see, a grotesquely fleshy nude male corpse is being sliced into and pawed at by a whirl of hungry hands. Forks and knives plunge in, feet and legs are severed, the crotch is served up on a plate. Don’t worry though, the man is made of pure Victoria sponge. It’s all cake. In one work, a naked white man runs from grabbing black hands, in another his legs lie prone on the ground as faceless figures around his corpse knock back booze. There’s the deep red of blood in loads of these paintings, being sloshed about in cups or scooped from jars, but it’s all wine or jam or deliciously ripe tomatoes. Sterling’s gory works of cartoony cannibalism are brilliant. She’s making up for millennia of male violence by turning the archetypal white man into a victim, a trophy to be hunted. She’s claiming gleeful, gluttonous dominance over him as a symbol. And all the political, racial points are being made with wild, giggling, humour. These are vicious, maniacal, hilarious, gore-drenched paintings by a young artist who just keeps getting better. But if she ever invites you over for dinner, run.  *full disclosure, I’ve been a huge fan of her work since her show at GCCA,

Flo Brooks: ‘Be Tru To Your Rec’

Flo Brooks: ‘Be Tru To Your Rec’

4 out of 5 stars

Flo Brooks’s new paintings are chaotic microcosms of everyday recreation. Each lumpy, odd-shaped panel is composed of multiple viewpoints out onto a rec area. One work is filled with LGBTQ+ flags, used syringes, coppers, goal posts and snails. Another is made up of joggers and sunbathers, big ripe blackberries and empty condom wrappers.Brooks is collaging all these clashing elements together because it’s what he sees out of his window, it’s the politics of the spaces around him; it’s the coppers and screaming kids and gay protesters and greasy burger vans and litter and sexualty of the spaces we have to share, of the common spaces that belong to all of us. There's a lot of criticism here, but a lot of joy too, and a whole heap of resistance. The life in these paintings clashes because that’s what we do, as a species, and Brooks captures it all with a unique visual style and aesthetic language. Painting it is a way of making sense of the politics of everyday life. Even if it’s dirty and messy and tense, at least it’s ours.

Rooted Beings

Rooted Beings

3 out of 5 stars

You might think plants are just green things you somehow can’t manage to keep alive in your flat, but they’re so much more than that. Plants are political. And the Wellcome wants to show you how.  Where normally with shows at the Wellcome there’s a big focus on science, here they’ve decided to take aim at the societal impact of plants, on how colonial explorers trampled on indigenous culture in the hunt for new species, destroyed habitats, ruined lives all in search of monocultures and profit. There are a few bits of archival material here – an ancient image of a comfrey on papyrus, a nineteenth century drawing of fungi, a beautiful circular depiction of jain cosmology – but most of the show is new contemporary art. There’s a huge passion flower costume and seaweed sculptures by Ingela Ihrman, a plane tree outfit by Edward Navarro and ‘foraged’ sculptures by the Resolve collective. Best of all is a wall of pretty drawings by Joseca, a Yanomami artist from the Brazilian Amazon. But the show doesn't quite work. Most of the art really isn’t great, and the lack of the usual Wellcome science knowledge and archival ephemera throws everything out of whack. It needs context, directness, and most of all – just like nature – it needs balance. 

‘Inspiring Walt Disney’

‘Inspiring Walt Disney’

4 out of 5 stars

There’s a chance – a slim one, but still a chance – that even the grumpiest miserable old bastard will have their heart softened by this show about the influence of European decorative arts on Disney. Not me, though. No way. I walked in confident, resolute: a football lout, an extreme music fan, an expert in serious contemporary art. A tough guy, an intellectual. And I absolutely did not walk out feeling like a Disney princess.  Ok, I did a bit. But that’s not fair, because this show has some sneaky tricks up its voluminously puffy sleeves. Like the music; lush, emotive Disney strings soundtrack the whole thing. You’re looking at a pair of rotating Höchst porcelain dancers next to early Disney animations of them twirling, you hear the swooping chords, and suddenly you think ‘this is magical’ and ah shit, did I just do a twirl like I’m Cinderella?  Walt Disney and his gang loved European art, design and architecture. They found endless inspiration in continental porcelain, glitzy castles and gold-drenched clocks and candelabras. You can see it in clips of Belle and the Beast dancing in a ballroom based on Versailles famous hall of mirrors, or Eliza from Frozen bouncing in front of Fragonard’s ‘The Swing’, the real version of which hangs nearby, and sketches of Cogsworth that sit next to elaborate old clocks. The rococo objects here are given new life by seeing how they inspired the animations of your youth, and the Disney works are given historical context. Combine all that wi

Raphael

Raphael

4 out of 5 stars

It’s best not to think about Raphael’s youth. He’d become one of the biggest artists of the Italian Renaissance by his twenties, the golden boy of the most important patron in Rome by his thirties, and had changed the shape of art for ever by the time he died just before reaching his forties. When I was in my twenties I got rejected from a job in a meat-packing factory. From the start, in this big, bold show of his art, design and architectural prowess, you can see that the Renaissance master knew who he was. His 1502 image of Saint Sebastian, made in central Italy when he was bloody 19, is terrifyingly self-assured. It’s beautifully composed and gorgeously painted, the fabrics are precise, the skin is luminescent. He was already so good. That didn’t go unnoticed. The commissions started coming thick and fast for young Raph: churchmen, bankers and merchants all wanted a slice. There are huge gleaming altarpieces on display, ultra-detailed biblical miniatures, intense portraits, a whole room of Madonnas and some of the ugliest babies in all of art. Raphael was everywhere. A whole room of madonnas and some of the ugliest babies in all of art. It wasn’t all pure God-given natural talent, he worked at it, studying his elders. There’s a little rough ink copy of Leonardo’s ‘Mona Lisa’, and next to it hangs Raphael’s ‘La Muta’, his breathtaking portrait of an incredibly fed-up brown-eyed woman. It’s an unfussy but hugely detailed painting, intimate but aloof, properly jawdropping.

‘Radio Ballads’

‘Radio Ballads’

2 out of 5 stars

Lucky old Barking and Dagenham. While the rest of London’s boroughs had to spend the last three years languishing without a bunch of artists parachuted in to run workshops with local people, Barking and Dagenham was blessed with Helen Cammock, Ilona Sagar, Rory Pilgrim and Sonia Boyce, all sent in to work with the community and make art out of it thanks to the council’s New Town Culture programme. The result is a series of films and installations about care, domestic abuse and health shown at the Serpentine, with a parallel show in Barking. Helen Cammock’s film is based on workshops she ran with care givers and receivers in the borough. She asks them to draw, sing and write and describe things like ‘the colour of care’, and intersperses images of the workshops with clips of grey skies and poetry by Sylvia Plath. There’s a table of books on display too, filled with writing by Deleuze and Camus. The issue here is that the real art for Cammock was working with the carers, so the film feels like a rushed afterthought, and a table full of critical theory texts is no one’s idea of a good gallery experience. It’s proof that art can be about serious topics without being good Sonia Boyce presents a four-screen installation soundtracked by the testimonies of domestic-abuse survivors and their loved ones. The screens show the people who voiced those testimonies dancing, interacting, smiling. It’s a clash of harrowing words and joyful imagery. It speaks of survival, of listening, of fin

News (282)

There's a huge photography fair coming to London next week

There's a huge photography fair coming to London next week

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then how much is a thousand pictures worth? Shitloads, probably, but there's only way way to find out, and that's by going the UK's biggest photography fair. And lucky for you, it's happening next week, because Photo London is back, taking over Somerset House once again for a week of exhibitions, booths and events. The fair attracts the biggest photography galleries in the world, and with them come the biggest photographers. This year, participating galleries include Magnum Photos, the Lee Miller Archives, Goodman Gallery and Christophe Guye Galerie. You can expect to see work by big names like Richard Avedon, Wolfgang Tillmans, Martin Parr and countless others. And guess what, it's all for sale. How much, you ask? Well, if you have to ask, you probably can't afford it, as they say. Lots, basically. It's all very, very expensive. Just find your favourite one, Google it when you get home, then ctrl + shift + p, easy peasy, you're now an art collector, congratulations. It's not all rampant art commercialism though, as each year the fair picks one artist out to celebrate as a 'Master of Photography' with a dedicated exhibition, and this year it's photographer and filmmaker Nick Knight. There are also a whole bunch of events, including tours, readings and talks with artists like Melanie Manchot, Conor McDonald and Polly Braden. Something for everyone, unless you think photography is the lowest of all the arts (yes, even below mime), in whic

There's an exhibition of art by Radiohead's Thom Yorke opening this month

There's an exhibition of art by Radiohead's Thom Yorke opening this month

Thom Yorke is a modern Renaissance man. Not only is he the singer in Radiohead, one of the world's leading bands that sound like Radiohead, but it turns out he's also an artist. Can he do maths or science or design buildings like the Renaissance men of the 1400s? No, but standards for Renaissancing are different in 2022.  Art is nothing new for the singer. He's been drawing for years, working most often with collaborator Stanley Donwood, who he met at university in Exeter in the 1980s. Donwood is responsible for all the Radiohead artwork from 1996's 'The Bends' onwards, but their relationship appears to have been at its most fruitful between 1999 and 2001, when the band was working on their now-classic 'Kid A' and 'Amnesiac' albums. The two would constantly send visual ideas to each other - often using something called a fax machine - and in the process managed to create a body of work, mainly comprised of drawings, that's now going on display at 8 Duke Street.  The drawings range from the cartoonish to the macabre, and are often violent, nightmarish and aggressive, but also tinged with silliness and cutesy humour. Unsurprisingly, considering the lyrical content of many of Yorke's most well known songs, the drawings tackle some big, dark, political ideas, with works about management buyouts, money-burning furnaces, sperm monsters and a stick man getting kicked in the nuts.  The show is on for just a couple of days, so book in quick if you don't want to be left high and dry.

The location of the immersive Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera exhibition has been announced

The location of the immersive Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera exhibition has been announced

Urgh, looking at art is so twentieth century. In the future, we won’t just LOOK at art, we’ll get to be inside of it. And guess what? The future’s here, because things like the immersive Van Gogh experience are real, and they’re damn popular. Ever dreamed of meandering through ‘Starry Night’ or doing shots of absinthe in ‘The Night Café’? Well, dream no more, because you can.  And after the huge success of that Van Gogh experience, it’s Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s turn to be given the immersive treatment. Opening next month, ‘Mexican Geniuses: A Frida and Diego Immersive Experience’ will be your chance to lose yourself in the great couple’s work. How will they treat the more extreme, emotional, violent aspects of both of their work? Probably very sensitively. The whole shebang launches on May 28 at Dock X in London, with tickets starting at £19.90. This will be a 360-degree digital experience, made up of giant screens, VR and sound elements to help you totally lose yourself in this iconic work. Each visit lasts around an hour, which should give you plenty of time to take it all in. Viva Mexico!  ‘Mexican Geniuses: A Frida and Diego Immersive Experience’, at Dock X from May 28. Tickets start at £19.90, available here. Can’t wait? Here are London’s top ten exhibitions on right now. And here are the best free art exhibitions on right now. 

There’s an immersive vomit exhibition by Bompas & Parr opening next week

There’s an immersive vomit exhibition by Bompas & Parr opening next week

It looks like Bompas & Parr, those cheeky experiential mavericks, really want to get stomachs turning with their new immersive exhibition. This time, they’re celebrating spew, with a whole show called ‘The Vomit Vault of London’, and featuring the launch of their book ‘Salute to Puke’, which looks at vom on the city street ‘as a symptom of economic and social recovery’. The exhibition will feature photos of vomit on the streets of London, sick bags on entry, mouthwash cocktails, a slime station and vile perfumes. You might very well be asking ‘umm…why?’ but rest assured, there’s definitely an answer. Bompas & Parr see vom on the streets as a symbol of excess, of binge drinking and hedonism, a clash of capitalism and ‘libertine values’. Now, as London opens back up after lockdown, spew is becoming a symbol of the return to normality. That’s a lot of thinking someone has put into vomit.  Is this London’s most disgusting exhibition? They think so, but then they probably haven’t seen what Damien Hirst has been up to lately.  'The Vomit Vault of London' is at the Crypt Gallery Apr 8-12, more details here. Want less disgusting exhibitions? Here are the top ten art shows in London.  And here are all the free art exhibitions in London.

バンクシーの3作品がサザビーズのオークションに出品

バンクシーの3作品がサザビーズのオークションに出品

オークションハウスのサザビーズに、「匿名アートの巨匠」であるバンクシーの作品が出品されることになった。 今回オークションにかけられるのは、歌手のロビー・ウィリアムスが所有する『Kissing Coppers』『Girl With Balloon』『Vandalised Oil (Choppers)』の3点で、どれもバンクシーの「古典」といえる貴重なもの。『Kissing Coppers』は、ブライトンのパブの壁に描かれたことでよく知られている。落札推定価格は1点につき、200万〜350万ポンド(約3億855万〜約5億3,996万円)になる見込みだ。 バンクシー作品のオークションといえば、同じサザビーズで起きた悪名高き「シュレッダー事件」が記憶に新しいだろう。落札された瞬間に裁断されて大きな話題となった作品は、その後「​シュレッダーで切り裂かれたバージョン」として再びサザビーズでオークションにかけられ、さらに高値で落札された。破砕れたものでも高くなるのが、アート界といえるだろう。 3作品は、2022年3月2日(水)に行われるオークションまで、ロンドンのサザビーズで展示されている 。世界で最も有名なオークションハウスで高額作品として扱われることほど、因襲打破的なストリートアートの反抗を象徴することはないかもしれない。 原文はこちら 関連記事 『原宿で開催中、過去最大級のバンクシー展をレポート』 『発表から2日で破壊されたバレンタイン作品がバンクシー展に登場』 『ついに姿を現したBanksy』 『家で楽しむニューヨークのストリートアート』 『世界で最もクールな30のストリート』 東京の最新情報をタイムアウト東京のメールマガジンでチェックしよう。登録はこちら

Three iconic Banksy works have just gone on display – and they’re for sale

Three iconic Banksy works have just gone on display – and they’re for sale

In great news for street-art fans, Sotheby’s auction house has put three classic, rare works by anonymous art megastar Banksy on display.  Amazingly, all three works belong to the singer Robbie Williams and will be going up for auction next month. The iconic ‘Kissing Coppers’ – originally painted on the wall of a pub in Brighton – is estimated at £2.5-3.5 million, ‘Girl With Balloon’ is estimated at £2-3 million and ‘Vandalised Oil (Choppers)’ is estimated at £2.5-3.5 million. This all follows hot on the heels of Banksy’s infamous shredded artwork, which hit headlines when it tore itself apart just as it was sold at auction, also at Sotheby’s. And then the shredded version went for even more than the non-shredded version, also at Sotheby’s. Totally normal art-world stuff, there. The three Robbie Williams-owned works are on display now until the auction on March 2, because nothing says iconoclastic street-art rebellion like big-ticket sales at the world’s most famous auction house.  The Now Evening Auction is at Sotheby’s, work is on display until Mar 2. Free. Details here.  Want some more? Here are the top ten art exhibitions in London.  Want some more, but free? Here are the best free art shows in town. 

This summer’s Serpentine Pavilion will be a beautiful place of rest and music

This summer’s Serpentine Pavilion will be a beautiful place of rest and music

The Serpentine Pavilion is a highlight of the summer art calendar - a brand new bit of gorgeous, temporary architecture in the middle of Hyde Park to go lounge about in for the two days a year it’s both warm and dry enough to venture outside. And this year’s looks like a doozy.  Designed by American artist Theaster Gates - who recently had a gorgeous show of ceramics at the Whitechapel Art Gallery - ‘Black Chapel’ is inspired by the kilns of Stoke-on-Trent and has been designed in collaboration with brilliant architect Sir David Adjaye.  Made mainly of wood, the church-like structure will feature a working bell from a demolished church in Gates’ native Chicago. In classic Gates-style, the pavilion is intended as a place for music and performance, so expect a program of events and concerts to be announced in due course.  Gates has become one of the most powerful, singular voices in contemporary art, and London’s been lucky to see tons of his art in recent years, but his Serpentine Pavilion might end up being the best thing he’s done in this city. Now it just needs to warm up and stop raining and we’ll be all good. The Serpentine Pavilion 2022 opens on June 10. More details here. Can't wait? Here are the best buildings in London that are already built. Want art? Here are the top ten exhibitions in London.

2022年世界のトレンド:つまらないNFTアートの終わり

2022年世界のトレンド:つまらないNFTアートの終わり

2021年、至る所に出現したものといえば、NFT。まさにどこにでもあり、大げさに扱われ、困惑させられる存在だった。NFTとはノンファンジブルトークン(Non Fungible Token、非代替性トークン)ではなく、ノーファ◯◯インサンクス(No F’in Thanks、マジでノーサンクス)の略かと思うほどだ。 しかしNFTは消えることなく、とどまるだろう。そこで、複雑で入り組んだコンセプトについて、少し学んでみよう。 複雑に「見える」NFT NFTの複雑さは、そのデザインによるところが大きい。アーティストや投資家は、自分たちの資産がユニークで魅力的であると感じてほしいと考え、このアートプロパガンダの一部に、不可解な言語的枠組みを作った。 しかし実際は、かなりシンプルなものといえる。まず、NFT自体はアートではない。NFTは契約書のようなものであり、アートを取引する場面で使われる。 例えば、あなたが作った画像があり、それを使って稼ぎたいとする。NFTを作ると、それが画像の追跡可能な契約書として機能し、誰が作ったものか、誰が買ったのかを証明することができるようになる。画像自体は単なる画像のまま。(繰り返しになるが)NFTは画像の所有権を証明するために作成され、交換される「契約」を示したものというわけだ。 NFTのアート化 にもかかわらず、NFTはアートのための契約ではなく、まるでそれ自体がアートであるかのように語られることが絶えない。例えば、NFTとアートの話題でよく取り上げられる話題に、NFTで大人気のキャラクター『​​CryptoKitties』や『Bored Ape』がある。 しかしこのようなケースでは、ほとんどアートは暗号資産を取引するための口実として存在している。作品には必然性がほとんどない。取引のための顔、その象徴になっていて、最も重要なことは契約。つまり金融投機であり、アートうんぬんではなくなっているのだ。 今肥大化しているのはその種のNFTアートで、想像できる限りの企業がこの「ゲーム」に参加している。見えてくるのは人気、貪欲、悪意といった、NFTの表層的な性質ばかり。そのレベルにあるものは、当然アートとしてもそれほど面白くない。アーティストのラファエル・ローゼンダールが最近言い得たように、まさに「2021年、会計士はアーティストになり、アーティストは会計士になった」というのが実情だろう。 クリプトネイティブによるアート ただその表層の下を見てみると、魅力的なものがたくさん湧き出ているのも確かだ。面白いアートとして「沸騰」してほしいと、希望的な観測を持てる「湧き水」もある。 例えば、NFTに対してよりキュレーション的なアプローチをとる、Feral Fileのようなプラットフォームはすでにある。IX ShellsやZach LiebermanのようにAI(人工知能)によるジェネレーティブアートを制作するアーティストや、Rhea MyersやMitchell Chanのように、「契約」を実際のメディアとして使用するアーティストもいる。 彼らは広い意味で「クリプトネイティブ(暗号資産ネイティブ)」なアーティスト。NFT技術を単に取引プラットフォームとして使うのではなく作品の中心に据えている。また同時にNFTのコンセプトを探求、拡大し、そして弱体化させる方法を見いだそうとしているのだ。 また今後は、NFTアートの「盗難」も起きてくるだろう。サルやネコ、ピクセル化された肖像画が盗まれたり、他人に自分の作品がNFT化されているのをアーティストが

Eight amazing artworks you have to see at Bloomberg New Contemporaries

Eight amazing artworks you have to see at Bloomberg New Contemporaries

Every year, Bloomberg New Contemporaries picks the best recent art graduates and whacks them all in a room together. The results can be messy, but they’re always interesting, and every year you get to have a glimpse of what young artists are making right now, and the chance to try to figure who might go on to bigger things. This year’s selection is the best in years, and is oddly full of horror and gore and nightmares. Here are eight artists that make the trip to the South London Gallery more than worth the bus ride.  Jinjoon Lee’s video of mangled bodies that morph and transform, all soundtracked by deep, ululating throat singing: horrifying and atmospheric. Jinjoon Lee, 'Empty Garden', copyright the artist. Karolina Dworska’s nightmare tapestry is filled with gross bodies, dripping with gore and violence. Karolina Dworska, 'Year Long Dream', copyright the artist. Rafal Zajko’s amazing suspension pod sculpture is a future sarcophagus for a glowing being, peering out from within. It feels like a 1990s kids’ TV vision of the future. Rafal Zajko, ‘Amber Chamber II (Resurgence)’, 2021. Copyright the artist. Davinia-Ann Robinson’s pile of mud and disembodied limbs looks like someone burst into flames and returned to the earth right on the gallery floor. Davinia-Ann Robinson, copyright the artist. Nisa Khan’s photo of a woman in a shalwar smoker a ciggie is austere and quiet. Nisa Khan, ‘Have you been sat there plucking your fanny hair’, 2018 Orsola Zane’s painting of a

There’s an immersive Gustav Klimt experience coming to London

There’s an immersive Gustav Klimt experience coming to London

If you’ve ever seen a painting by Gustav Klimt – one of the great masters of modern art – and thought ‘sure, this is nice, but it would be loads better if it was the size of a building and projected on to a wall and you could, like, walk around in it and stuff’, well your dreams are about to come true. Hot on the heels of the Van Gogh and Frida Kahlo immersive experiences, London’s about to get absolutely Klimted.  Using VR and digital mapping technologies, the new immersive experience will take classic Klimt artworks like ‘The Kiss’ an ‘Judith and the Head of Holofernes’ and put viewers right inside them. It’s 20,000 square feet of immersive Klimt.  If you can’t wait until July, when this is due to open, or you’d like a real immersive Klimt experience, in a way that the artist intended, his Beethoven Frieze in the Secession Building in Vienna is a wrap-around painting that totally surrounds you and is utterly beautiful. No VR headsets in sight, though.  Klimt: The Immersive Experience opens on Jul 21, tickets from £19.90, £11.50 for kids. More details here, and you can book here.  There’s also a Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera immersive experience on the way. And here are the top ten exhibitions you can see in London right now. 

ロンドン自然史博物館、野生生物写真コンテストの最終候補を発表

ロンドン自然史博物館、野生生物写真コンテストの最終候補を発表

ロンドン自然史博物館が主催する野生生物をテーマにした写真コンテスト『Wildlife Photographer of the Year』の2022年版ノミネート作品が発表された。このコンテストは1965年にスタート。毎年自然写真家たちが美的感覚を競い合い、毎年たった一人の独創的な写真家が選ばれる。 今年の応募総数は約5万点。審査員によって絞られた25点のノミネート作品は、当然ながらどれもすてきだ。煙をまとったようなキツネ、飛び跳ねるリス、抱き合って昼寝をしている毛むくじゃらのキンシコウなど、野生動物のちょっとした瞬間を捉えている。 ©Antonio Liebana Navarro, Wildlife Photographer of the Year   ©Karl Samitsch, Wildlife Photographer of the Year   これらの写真は全て博物館で展示されていて、オンラインでも見ることができる。一般の人から選ばれるピープルズチョイス賞へ投票も受付中だ。つまり、誰がこの賞を獲得するか、そして、誰が敗れてライオンの餌食になるのかを決めるのはあなた次第というわけだ。野生生物の世界のように、残酷な競争といえるかもしれない。 受賞者は2022年2月9日(水)に発表される。 ©Zhang Qiang, Wildlife Photographer of the Year 原文はこちら 関連記事 『笑える野生動物写真賞、最優秀作品はどれに?』 『中国政府、パンダ保護のための国立公園を設立』 『約1万匹が生息していると推測、ロンドンに多くのキツネがいる理由』 『動物と触れ合える観光スポット10選』 『動物と触れ合えるグランピング5選』 東京の最新情報をタイムアウト東京のメールマガジンでチェックしよう。登録はこちら

The shortlist for Wildlife Photographer of the Year is here, and it's...wild

The shortlist for Wildlife Photographer of the Year is here, and it's...wild

Wildlife Photographer of the Year - the Natural History Museum's competition that pits nature snapper versus nature snapper in an aesthetic battle to the death, where only one creative can emerge victorious - is back! The jury has whittled down the selection from 50,000 entries down to just 25, and this year there are some doozies. We've got a smokey fox, a bear in therapy, a leaping squirrel and a heck of a lot of furry dudes just settling in for a nice cuddle and a nap. Lovely stuff. You can go see all of these photos for yourself at the Natural History Museum. We've put some of our favourites below, but the full shortlist is online here, and just waiting for your votes. You get to decide who wins, and more importantly, who loses and is fed to lions. It's a cruel, cruel competition.  ©Antonio Liebana Navarro, Wildlife Photographer of the Year ©Jeroen Hoekendijk, Wildlife Photographer of the Year ©Karl Samitsch, Wildlife Photographer of the Year ©Zhang Qiang, Wildlife Photographer of the Year Find out more about the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition right here. Want more photography? Here are the best photography shows in London. And here are the top ten exhibitions you can see right now.