Top ten: Kitchenware stores

Hit these local shops to stock up on cooking accoutrements.

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  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    A Cook's Companion

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    A Cook's Companion

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Leaf- and heart-shaped cookie cutters, $1 each, at A Cook's Companion

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Bowery Kitchen Supply Equipment

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Kiwi-shaped circular glass working top, $26, at Bowery Kitchen Supply Equipment

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Peter Parker sandwich made with mixed greens, avocado, portobello mushrooms, mozzarella and balsamic dressing; $9, at Bowery Kitchen Supply Equipment

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Broadway Panhandler

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Incredible Hulk shot glasses, $4 each, at Broadway Panhandler

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Bodum milk frother, $30, at Broadway Panhandler

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    The Brooklyn Kitchen

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    William Kellogg graffiti spray paint cocktail shaker, $20, at The Brooklyn Kitchen

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    Sagaform jigsaw puzzle coasters, set of four $15, at The Brooklyn Kitchen

  • Photograph: Cinzia Reale-Castello

    Epicurean cutlery-patterned cutting board, $22, at The Brooklyn Kitchen

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Fishs Eddy

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Fishs Eddy Brooklynese Collection Shuguh bowl, $11; and Cawfee cup, $10

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Fishs Eddy Strip Tea highball glass, set of four $22

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Fishs Eddy glass jade cake stand, $45

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Global Table

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Global Table

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Japanese ceramic striped bowl, $10; and plate, $14; both at Global Table

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Thomas Paul melamine sea creature plates, set of four $36, at Global Table

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    The Kitchen Clique

  • Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Red Pomegranate gold flower petal plate, $18, at The Kitchen Clique

  • Photograph:Lindsay Maclean Taylor

    Korin

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Tarzian West

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Swissmar orange ombr fondue set, $70, at Tarzian West

  • Photograph: Marielle Solan

    Metrokane Mighty OJ four-and-a-half pound juicer, $52, at Tarzian West

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Whisk

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Aladdin to-go tumblers with sweat-proof double walls, $9 each, at Whisk

  • Photograph: Alex Strada

    Kitchen Aide mixer, $350, at Whisk

Photograph: Lindsay Maclean Taylor

A Cook's Companion

A Cook's Companion
You'll immediately feel welcomed when you enter this homey store that has seafoam-green walls and warm hardwood floors. Knowledgeable staffers jump at the chance to help you, and owner Jennifer Baron is frequently right alongside them, making sure her well-edited collection of kitchenware is exactly what you're looking for. In fact, she's spent the past 14 years serving Brooklyn denizens and taking all of their needs into consideration when stocking the store. The emporium is brimming with useful and affordable food prep devices such as a set of Chef'n collapsible measuring cups ($15) and Pacific Merchants wooden bowls ($33). Toward the back of the store, you'll discover a small room devoted to knives (sharpening services will run you $3.50 apiece) and a separate section of bakeware that you won't find in chain stores, including Wilton whoopie pie pans ($13) and cookie cutters ($2 each) shaped as snowflakes, dog bones, ghosts and martini glasses. Nifty products like Westmark cherry pitters ($14) and Prodyne fruit infusion pitchers that add a natural fruit flavor to tea or water ($27) are on hand, but budget-minded cooks will love the selection of standby electric cooking appliances that are always discounted, including Cuisinart hand blenders (were $90, now $50) and Breville toasters (once $160, now $129). 197 Atlantic Ave between Clinton and Court Sts, Brooklyn Heights, Brooklyn (718-852-6901, acookscompanion.com)

Bowery Kitchen Supply Equipment
Don't be surprised if you spot Rachael Ray perusing the aisles of this well-stocked store housed in the Chelsea Market, which also happens to be home to the Food Network studios. The original shop on the Lower East Side opened in 1975 to serve the New York restaurant industry, and while it continues to operate exclusively to the trade, owners Howard Nourieli and Robyn Coval opened this second location 15 years ago to cater to the general public. Inside the sprawling space, you'll discover a wide variety of products for the novice cook and professional chef alike. Newbies needing recipe help will appreciate acrylic cookbook holders ($12), while kiwi-patterned circular glass working tops provide the ideal surface for meat prepping and pounding ($26). Bobby Flays-to-be might benefit from pancake dispensers ($29) and jumbo capacity choppers that make cutting onions a less teary feat ($29). A knife sharpening station will get your tools in gear ($3--$20 per blade), and famished shoppers can grab grub from Bowery Eats, an in-store deli serving tasty sandwiches like the Peter Parker ($9), made with mixed greens, avocado, portobello mushrooms, mozzarella and balsamic dressing. Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off in-store purchases (excluding equipment, furniture, special orders and sandwiches) through October 6. 88 Tenth Ave between W 15th and 16th Sts (212-376-4982, bowerykitchens.com)

Broadway Panhandler
The oversize male mannequin dressed as a woman in this store's display window might throw you for a loop, but once you walk inside, the Mrs. Doubtfire look-alike makes sense. Owner Norman Kornbleuth, who opened the business in 1976, is preparing shoppers for a not-so-serious, friendly atmosphere inside his shop, which contains a balanced selection of quirky and classic cooking merch. Customers can depend on a well-informed staff and quality kitchen staples, such as Joyce Chen steamers ($22), American Kitchen frying pans ($50) and Bodum milk frothers ($30). There's also a smattering of cheeky gifts, including old-school cafeteria trays ($1), Incredible Hulk shot glasses ($4) and ice cube molds shaped as dentures ($8). While you're there, take advantage of the free in-store cooking demonstrations from top New York chefs like Tuhin Dutta, who helms the kitchen at Seasons in Brooklyn Heights. Mention TONY to receive a free Broadway Panhandler flexible cutting mat (worth $3) with every purchase over $10 through October 6. 65 E 8th St between Broadway and Mercer Sts (212-966-3434, broadwaypanhandler.com)

The Brooklyn Kitchen
It's hard not to find something to do, eat or buy at this bi-level, industrial-inspired establishment that resembles a renovated auto garage. Aside from the surplus of new cooking contraptions from trusted brands such as All-Clad, Microplane and Vita-Mix, there's a small produce section and butcher, the Meat Hook, in the back of the store. A large room to its left holds classes that cater to at-home cooks—everything from pickling to pie making—and upstairs you'll find DIY beer brewing supplies ($1--$100) and baking tools ($1--$400), along with a working kitchen used for smaller cooking classes. This one-stop-shop feel is exactly what owners Harry Rosenblum and Taylor Erkkinen had in mind when they opened the Brooklyn Kitchen in 2006. And while it may sound a bit overwhelming, there are plenty of hip associates happy to help you find the perfect coffeepot—they suggest the AeroPress espresso and coffeemaker ($30)—or a no-fail knife, like the LamsonSharp eight-inch chef's style ($100). Noncooks who just want cool-looking goods to display will delight in William Kellogg's graffiti spray paint cocktail shakers ($20) and Sagaform jigsaw puzzle coasters ($15). If you can't manage to find anything you need, at the very least you might score a date by leaving your phone number and a short description of yourself on the Single Foodie bulletin board. Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off all in-store purchases through October 6. 100 Frost St between Manhattan and Meeker Aves, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (718-389-2982, thebrooklynkitchen.com)

Fishs Eddy
Eye candy is plentiful at this recently expanded shop that's light on cooking tools but heavy on stylish flatware ($1--$17), dinnerware ($10--$37) and glassware ($5--$22). Packed with nautical references—like wooden display signs held up by sailor's rope and a ship wheel festooned with hanging utensils—the store is an amusing re-creation of the defunct factories and warehouses where owners Julie Gaines and David Lenovitz discovered the dishes they started selling in 1986. Today, Fishs Eddy is home to both vintage finds and new products from the house brand that are inspired by classic American restaurant-ware but designed with a dash of edge. To wit, look for white plates modeled after slices of pizza ($9) from the Shape Shack collection or the witty Shuguh bowls ($11) and Cawfee cups ($10) from the Brooklynese collection. Fervent party throwers will love Strip Tea highball glasses (set of four $22) emblazoned with tasteful female dancers, while serious bakers can use glass jade cake stands ($45) to put their homemade confections on a proper pedestal. Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off all purchases through October 6. 889 Broadway at 19th St (212-420-9020, fishseddy.com)

Global Table
When former stylist Nathalie Smith noticed the bevy of fashion editors hauling ceramics back from their trips to Paris, she decided to open a New York store in 1996 that would bring such worldly wares closer to home. Since then, Global Table has been a go-to spot for simple glassware ($6--$72) and tableware ($8--$60) sourced from around the globe with clean lines and gorgeous glazes. The serene space is flanked by two accent walls—one painted a soft lime green, the other a light yellow—and overflowing with dishes ($8--$60), serving pieces ($20--$80) and candles ($12--$28) that sit on rustic wooden shelves and tables. Impress houseguests with ceramic Japanese bowls ($10) and plates ($14) featuring striking blue stripes, or a large serving bowl made of recycled glass ($46). Shoppers who err on the side of clumsy but still want to be chic would be wise to pick up Thomas Paul nonbreakable melamine sea creature plates (set of four $36) and Pine Cone Hill yellow-and-cream Madeline-cotton napkins (set of four $50). Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off all purchases through October 6. 107 Sullivan St between Prince and Spring Sts (212-431-5839, globaltable.com)

The Kitchen Clique
Husband and wife Martin and Faigie Sprecher spent a year selling cookware and small appliances online before opening this brick-and-mortar business in 2002. Although the trek from the nearest subway station to the Midwood store could satisfy your weekly calorie-burning quota, it's worth the 15 minute walk if you're looking for sheer variety. The shop, which will remind you of a semi-organized basement, is a jumble of useful items such as Kuhn Rikon egg separators ($15), Prepara herb savor pods that keep herbs fresh ($20) and at least eight different kinds of ice cream scoops, including one that dispenses circular yet flat dollops ($15). A dedicated room off to the side holds china from upscale brands like Wedgwood and Nikko, but the pretty gold plates from Red Pomegranate that mimic a delicate flower petal ($18 each) are an affordable option. Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off all purchases through October 6. 3009 Ave L between Nostrand Ave and E 31st St, Midwood, Brooklyn (718-692-2260, kitchenclique.com)

Korin
After 21 years of supplying New York City restaurants with fine Japanese tableware, owner Saori Kawano opened her shop to the public in 2003. Skilled chefs like Eric Ripert, Marcus Samuelsson and Anita Lo frequent the minimalist store, which is best known for its Japanese knife selection and sharpening services ($15--$25 per knife), but it's teeming with beautiful things for the non-Iron Chef, too, including items from brands such as Cook-Zen, Komasuji and Tar Hong. Gorgeous tableware, such as grainy ceramic dishes with a subtle coil texture from Korin's Brown Collection ($4--$18 per dish), are displayed on glass shelves. An alcove houses Zo Jirushi rice cookers ($108--$427), wok and ladle sets ($39), and Noshi Gushi small bamboo skewers ($3) that are perfect for your next grown-up bash. Intimidating display cases filled with top-notch knives ($50--$5,000), including Korin Usuba styles ($166--$680) and Suisin Aya blades ($625--$1,032), are housed at the back of the store. Thankfully, a bevy of friendly associates can help you make the sharpest choice. Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off all purchases through October 6. 57 Warren St between Broadway and Church Sts (212-587-7021, korin.com)

Tarzian West
Judy Kow and Miho Takai bought this 35-year-old Park Slope staple from its previous owner four years ago after doing stints in restaurant management and fine arts, respectively. Though the small, renovated brownstone is only one quarter the size of its big-box competitors, staffers use every inch of space by stacking cookware and a small selection of housewares from the floor to the ceiling on sturdy steel shelves. Along with bright, fun products, such as Swissmar orange ombr fondue sets ($70) and BBQ serving sets that include plastic baskets, gingham-print napkins and classic ketchup and mustard dispensers ($20), there are tons of small appliances perfect for New York City apartment renters. Items like four-and-a-half pound Mighty OJ Juicers ($52) and petite four-quart fryers ($45) won't smother your tiny kitchen. Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off all purchases through October 6. 194 Seventh Ave at 2nd St, Park Slope, Brooklyn (718-788-4213, tarzian-west.com)

Whisk
This charming store was founded by three Brooklyn locals (Natasha Amott, Jocelyn Patten and Stephanie Cohen) who noticed a kitchenware hole in the Williamsburg market and took it upon themselves to fill it three years ago. The quaint spot features endearing Julia Child quotes scribbled on small chalkboards and cozy wooden shelves, tables and hutches that hold an array of foodie-friendly products. You'll find tried-and-true cookware such as raspberry-colored Kitchen Aide mixers ($350) and Rival Crock Pot Stoneware slow cookers ($48), but there are also plenty of handy gadgets that fall under the "didn't know this existed but I absolutely need it" category. Harold Import bamboo toast tongs ($2), Amco Housewares avocado slicers and pitters ($15) and Aladdin to-go tumblers with sweat-proof double walls ($9) are sure to make your must-have list. Since the discerning staff test-drives each item in stock, you won't have to worry about buyer's remorse. Mention TONY to receive 10 percent off all purchases through October 6. 231 Bedford Ave between North 3rd and North 4th Sts, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (718-218-7230, whisknyc.com)

SEE WHAT'S COOKING! The fourth-annual New York City Wine & Food Festival runs September 29 through October 2. For more info and to purchase tickets to events, visit nycwineandfoodfestival.com.

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