The Tony Awards

Follow our coverage for all the nominees, predictions of winners, interviews, reviews and news about Broadway's big night

There is no bigger night in New York theater than the annual Tony Awards, when the best on Broadway are recognized for their outstanding acting, brilliant musical numbers, stellar direction, writing and everything else that makes theatergoers the devoted fans they are. It's a thrill to revisit all the highs of the season, pore overthe Tony nominees list and root for the productions and people that moved us the most. With this ultimate guide to the 2015 Tony Awards, you can revisit every stellar moment from the Broadway season, and get prepped to watch the awards broadcast on Sunday, June 7, 2015.

When are the Tony Awards?

The 69th Annual Tony Awards are on June 7, 2015 at 8:00 PM ET.

Where are the Tony Awards?

The Tony Awards are held at Radio City Music Hall and televised live on CBS.

How do I get tickets to the Tony Awards?

Tickets to the 69th Annual Tony Awards will go on sale in the spring on the Tony Awards website.

The 2015 Tony Awards

Blog

Give the Tony Award to the most deserving: Kelli O’Hara

Two days ago my esteemed colleague Adam Feldman uttered a cri de coeur rallying Tony voters to support Kristin Chenoweth, dammit, because she is so amazing in On the Twentieth Century and it is a crime—a crime—that she has never gotten a Tony Award for Leading Actress in a Musical. He made a strong argument.But I disagree. I believe Kelli O’Hara deserves to win the Tony for her immaculately poised and richly modulated performance as Anna in Lincoln Center Theater’s revival of The King and I. Weighing all the elements—vocal brilliance, acting subtlety, conception of role, support of artistic vision and that X factor of a star challenging herself—I find myself more impressed by O’Hara’s achievement than Chenoweth’s admittedly delightful turn.Of course, like all talent contests at this high a level, the race is inherently silly, comparing apples and oranges—or perhaps, apples of equally complex savor. Chenoweth is in terrific voice, she’s funny as all get-out, and Lily Garland is precisely the kind of role she can do with both hands tied behind her back. What’s more, Chenoweth is clearly, on some intangible level, channeling the wonderful Madeline Kahn—who originated the role in 1978. What’s not to like?And yet O’Hara is giving a smart, deeply felt performance that is by turns radiant and restrained (when it needs to be), centered and nuanced, humor mingled with melancholy. She is the anchor in a production that revisits a Broadway classic that, in 64 years since it opened, has

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Blog

Give Kristin Chenoweth the Tony Award she deserves

The Tony Awards will be broadcast on CBS on June 7, and as is often the case in Broadway-loving circles, much of the talk this year is about the race for Best Actress in a Musical. We are blessed in 2015 with multiple strong contenders—perhaps the strongest field since 2004. But one nominee, despite her small physical stature, stands head and shoulders above the rest. That nominee is Kristin Chenoweth for On the Twentieth Century, and if she doesn’t win, it will be a crime against musical theater. To me, Chenoweth is not just the right choice; she is the obviously right choice. This is a relevant distinction, because a lot of people seem to be overlooking the obvious. Conventional wisdom this season has held that the Best Actress race would come down to Chenoweth and Kelli O’Hara, for The King and I; lately, there has also been a surge of support for Chita Rivera, for The Visit. Both of those women are giving very good performances, but Chenoweth is giving a legendary one. Rivera, of course, is already an icon. Her turn in The Visit draws from that reputation; at 82, she has only to appear onstage, looking regal and sly, and the audience colors her in with nearly 60 years of Broadway history. But she doesn’t have all that much else to do in The Visit, an evocative but slender musical parable, and Best Actress should not be an award for lifetime achievement. (I would be happy to see Rivera get one of those; she could put it next to her other two Tonys, and her medal from the

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Blog

2015 Tony Award nominations

This morning, Broadway-bound Bruce Willis and Mary-Louise Parker announced the nominees for the 2015 Tony Awards. While for us there weren’t a lot of surprises (our pre-nominations were pretty close), there are still lessons to be drawn from the announcement. 1. Choreography is more than dance. Most of the names in this category came as no surprise: Christopher Wheeldon for his gorgeous ballet sequences for An American in Paris and Casey Nicholaw’s boffo Elizabethan England–meets–Las Vegas showmanship in Something Rotten! But less expected was Scott Graham & Steven Hoggett for Frantic Assembly, which created the intricate movement vocabulary for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. In this hyper-stylized drama about a youth on the autism spectrum, no character dance, per se, but every footstep and gyration has been carefully plotted out. Nice to see Tony acknowledging that all movement has a method. 2. Harvey Weinstein snubbed—or was he? The widely panned Peter Pan musical Finding Neverland did not receive a single Tony nomination, which some have seen as a defiant gesture toward the show’s producer, Hollywood superpower Harvey Weinstein. And yes, Weinstein has made a lot of clumsy missteps in his dealings with the Broadway community. But the truth is that Finding Neverland just isn’t very good, and in a year with so much competition—ten original musicals, plus five revivals—it was roundly outclassed. Finding Neverland didn’t need to be snubbed: It earned its

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Blog

Post-Tony nomination massacres

It’s a grim annual ritual: Tony Award nominations come out and snubbed shows start dropping like flies. Yesterday it was Living on Love, the Renée Fleming vehicle that received less than loving responses, struggled at the box office, and then gave up after garnering zero nods. Living on Love goes cold this Sunday.The Heidi Chronicles opted for pre-emptive action: After failing to draw audiences to this Wendy Wasserstein revival—despite casting Mad Men star Elisabeth Moss—producers announced a premature end last week. It also shutters after Sunday’s matinee.So who’s next? All eyes are on Doctor Zhivago, which got some of the nastiest notices of the season (including this pan from yours truly). The show looks expensive to keep going on what must be terrible word of mouth, and it too was completely ignored by Tony nominators. Last week the box office take was $485K—probably shy of the behemoth’s weekly “nut” (the basic cost of running it). But with 50 producers (is that a record?) there might be cash sloshing around to burn. But how long?Hand to God (five nominations) and It Shoulda Been You (zero nominations) each filled 73% of the house last week. The Visit was at 72% capacity. Each is praying to do better business in coming months, either from June Tony wins or an uptick in word of mouth.Otherwise, most of the nominated shows are doing well at the box office: The King and I, Something Rotten!, An American in Paris and Fun Home are playing to full or near-full capacity. Wolf H

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Theater

The 25 best Tony Awards performances

The Tony Awards are not just a celebration of excellence in Broadway theater, but also a national showcase and public record of performances that are otherwise local and fleeting. The most memorable Tony moments can echo in theater history for years or decades to come. But which are the best of the best? We've surveyed every performance of a nominated musical or musical revival since CBS's first Tony telecast (in 1967), and here's our list of the top 25. Note that we're limiting ourselves to Tony-nominated shows in the years they were nominated; don't look here for special material, musical guests, opening medleys and the like. So without further ado—and steeling yourself for the possibility that some of your favorites didn't make the cut—prepare to be razzle-dazzled by the greatest of the Great White Way. Curtain up! RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Theater

Play Time Out New York’s Tony Awards Drinking Game: everybody wins!

Okay, after some internal struggle, you have accepted that Broadway is big enough to accommodate both An American in Paris and Something Rotten! You've alienated workplace colleagues with incessant talk of how British director Stephen Daldry should be nominated for The Audience as well as Skylight. You’ve had sleepless debating if the gold should go to Kelli or Kristin. And for your weekly spin class you use a shuffle mix of On the Town, Fun Home and On the Twentieth Century. You’ve invited all your Tony-obsessed friends to see the broadcast, regularly checking the Time Out New York Twitter feed for witty observations. What's left but to drink? Following are rules for getting royally sloshed on Tony night, which is one guaranteed way of enjoying it. RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage  Round one (8pm-9pm): • Take a polite drink every time there's a celebrity presenter who was on Broadway this year but was not nominated for a Tony but is gamely presenting anyhow because they want to show they're not bitter about not having been nominated.  • Suck bitchily on your white-wine spritzer every time someone gets pitchy. • Two sips for every double entendre.  Round two (9pm-10pm): • Each time co-hosts Kristin or Alan make a joke about Wolf Hall’s length, down a hearty draught of ale. • When Hand to God sock puppet Tyrone is bleeped out for profanity, chug. • For each joke about dysfunctional families (Fun Home, Hand to God, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the

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2015 Tony Award nominated shows currently on Broadway

Theater

Airline Highway

Life spurts out all over the place in the first two thirds of Lisa D’Amour’s Airline Highway. The setting is the parking lot of the Humming Bird, a decaying New Orleans motel that brims with scuffed, muddily colorful characters. 

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Theater

An American in Paris

The arrival of two big musicals derived from classic 1950s movies located in the City of Light (see Gigi) indicates either a resurgent interest in the early film oeuvre of Leslie Caron or a lack of producer imagination.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Theater

The Audience

The teen Elizabeth, fated to wear the crown and wield the scepter as Queen of England, hates her new digs at Buckingham Palace. “It’s like being trapped in a museum,” whines the unhappy girl. Contrast her experience with ours at Peter Morgan’s The Audience. For two hours, we watch a pageant of prime ministers, from Churchill to Cameron, in fictionalized weekly debriefs with their monarch. 

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Theater

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Based on the 2003 best-seller about an autistic teen’s search for the killer of his neighbor’s pooch, this stage thriller comes to Broadway on a wave of acclaim from England. The adaptation is by the prolific Simon Stephens, and the spectacular staging is by Marianne Elliott (War Horse).

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Fun Home

It’s her job to fit stories into boxes. But her own life story resists easy lines. Lisa Kron and Jeanine Tesori’s Fun Home, based on Bechdel’s graphic memoir, gracefully and movingly contrasts two narratives. One is about Alison (played as an adult by Beth Malone, as a college student by Emily Skeggs and as a child by Sydney Lucas) and her nervous, joyous self-discovery as a lesbian.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Gigi

Champagne, as Gigi reminds us, “is not actually a force of nature, but the result of industrial chemistry!” Neither natural force nor chemistry, alas, is much in evidence at this fizzless toast to Parisian romance in the Belle Époque.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Hand to God

Praise be to the angels behind it: Hand to God has made it to Broadway. No need for heavenly choir music, though, because the reception the play deserves is the one it gets nightly at the Booth: roars of gleeful laughter.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Theater

It's Only a Play

A neophyte playwright (Matthew Broderick) anxiously awaits reviews of his Broadway debut in Terrence McNally's bitchy but affectionate homage to show folk, which appeared in various incarnations at Manhattan Theatre Club in 1982 and ’85.

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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More Tony coverage

Theater

The 5 best bars for watching the Tony Awards

Looking for a show while you watch a show about other shows? Then this list is for you.

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Five theater clichés the Tony Awards just can't resist

The familiar is always comforting—especially, it seems, to the members of the Tony nominating committee. There are certain hoary theater conventions they love to reward, if not with actual statuettes then at least with nominations. Here are five of the most egregious. The big black girl with a big voice who belts out a big number Tony doesn’t reward all of these characters—there are just too darn many of them! This season alone, there were four new ones: Capathia Jenkins in Newsies, Kecia Lewis-Evans in Leap of Faith, Liz Mikel in Lysistrata Jones and Da'Vine Joy Randolph in Ghost, who snagged a Tony nod for being the only bright spot in a deadly show. It’s true that some excellent character actors working on Broadway today fit this archetype (see Tony Award winner Lillias White), but just once we’d like to see a thin Asian girl get a chance to bring down the house. 

Actors who provide their own accompaniment Perhaps this is less a cliché than a trend that started when director John Doyle earned accolades and Tony Awards for his mountings of Sweeney Todd and Company (and next, possibly, Merrily We Roll Along). True, the cast of Once pulls impressive quadruple duty acting, singing, dancing and playing various instruments. But while leads Steve Kazee and Cristin Milioti deserved recognition, we had to consult our Playbills to remember Best Featured Actress nominee Elizabeth A. Davis. And even then, we’re not sure what’s so great about her beyond the fact that she really know

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Theater

Ten Tony Blunders

Theater devotees know that the only thing more entertaining than predicting the Tonys is second-guessing them. So without further delay, here is our guide to the worst Tony decisions in each of the past ten years.

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Theater

Tony clip of the day

As the Tony Awards loom on the horizon, what's an obsessive to do? Dig into the past, of course, to relive some of the most memorable moments from past telecasts. We've already compiled a list of the top 25 performances by Best Musical nominees over the years—the Tonys' greatest hits. Now we turn our attention to the B-sides and rarities: a new video each day, all celebrating the quirkier side of the Tonys—the good, the bad and the campy. RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Past Tony coverage

Tony Awards 2014! Winners and losers

Another year, another Tony Awards telecast. In general, the gold went to the most deserving of the season: Few would carp about Bryan Cranston or Neil Patrick Harris nabbing top honors, and relative newcomers (Sophie Okenedo and Lena Hall) were recognized too. 

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2014 Tony Award predictions

As we noted five weeks ago, when the 2014 Tony Award nominations were announced, some of the races were made less interesting than they could have been. 

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Exclusive: The 2014 TONY* nominees have been announced!

Yes, the actual Tony Award nominations will be announced Tuesday at 8:30am. But we just couldn’t wait. So here’s our annual trick—er, tradition: the TONY* (*Time Out New York) nominations! 

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Tony Award forecast 2014: Best Actor in a Play

As part of our run-up to the Tony Awards on June 8, we recently studied the field for Best Actress in a Musical. Now we turn to the big nonmusical acting category for leading men. 

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Tony Award forecast 2014: Best Actor in a Musical

As the theater world girds its loins for the Tony Awards on June 8, we’ll be taking periodic closer looks at the competition for some of the major prizes.

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Tony Awards forecast 2014: Best Actress in a Musical

As part of our run-up to the Tony Awards on June 8, we recently examined the candidates for Best Actor in a Musical. Now we turn to the distaff side to look at the highly competitive field for Best Actress in a Musical—a race that finds three of Broadway’s favorite leading ladies playing catch-up with a newer arrival.

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Theater

2013 Tony winners

In the press room backstage at Radio City Music Hall last night, after winning his Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play, Tracy Letts asked for the two of us by name. Exactly what he wanted to tell us, we don’t know; we were watching at home like regular folks. But we’re guessing he wanted to gloat a bit about his upset win; we had confidently predicted (along with pretty much everyone else) that Tom Hanks would take Best Actor for his performance in Lucky Guy.RECOMMENDED: See all Tony Awards coverage Okay: As far as predictions go, it wasn't our best year on record. We correctly called 18 of the 26 categories, but missed the boat on Letts and his Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf director, Pam MacKinnon—and the night’s biggest winner, Kinky Boots, which nabbed Best Musical over it chief rival, Matilda. Our poll of Time Out readers, in fact, bested us by one point, with 19 correct predictions. Score one for crowdsourcing! (Nineteen was also the highest score achieved by any of the 17 experts featured this year on the Gold Derby site.) It was a night of small surprises. But no one who judged the shows based only on their Tony performances last night would be especially shocked at the Kinky Boots win. Neither musical came off smashingly. Matilda’s intelligent lyrics were largely unintelligible, and Kinky Boots’ “Everybody Say Yeah,” a major crowd-pleaser in the show itself, looked diffuse on the vast stage of Radio City Music Hall, which has been draining life from Tony musical numb

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Theater

2013 Tony Award predictions

After five weeks of buildup, the Tony Awards will be awarded on Sunday—and theater fans should brace themselves for a more suspenseful broadcast than usual. Sure, a few of the winners are gimmes (start practicing your speech now, Andrea Martin), but most of the races are nail-biters. Will Best Musical go to the thorny but cute English import (Matilda) or the precision-tooled American crowd-pleaser (Kinky Boots)? Can the still-running The Trip to Bountiful wrest Best Revival from its already-closed rivals? And who will nose ahead in the tightly matched field for Best Featured Actor in a Play? We’ve gazed into our cloudy crystal ball and we've ranked the nominees below, from most to least likely to win. (How do they compare to your own votes in our readers' poll?) To show which races are especially competitive, we’ve assigned them symbols accordingly.  Lock     Tight race     Dark horse     Honor to be nominated RECOMMENDED: See all Tony Awards coverage

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