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Dear Evan Hansen
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew MurphyDear Evan Hansen

Complete A-Z list of Broadway musicals and Off Broadway musicals in NYC

Our complete A-Z listings of Broadway musicals and Off Broadway musicals will help you find the best musicals in NYC

Adam Feldman
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Adam Feldman
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Broadway musicals are the beating heart of New York City. These days, your options are more diverse than ever: cultural game-changers like Hamilton and raucous comedies like The Book of Mormon are just down the street from moving dramas like Dear Evan Hansen, sweeping operettas like The Phantom of the Opera and family classics like The Lion King. Whether you're looking for classic Broadway songs, spectacular sets and costumes, star turns by Broadway divas or dance numbers performed by the hottest chorus boys and girls, there is always plenty to choose from. Here is our list of all the Broadway musicals that are currently running or on their way, followed by a list of those in smaller Off Broadway and Off-Off Broadway venues.

RECOMMENDED: The best Broadway shows

Complete Broadway Musicals A–Z

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West

Disney's latest toon tuner is a tourist-family–friendly theme-park attraction, robed in the billowing fabrics of orientalist Arabian fantasy. As in the 1992 film, the Genie (a charismatic James Monroe Iglehart) steals the show from its eponymous “street rat” hero (Adam Jacobs). Stuffed with glitz, the musical is a carpet with little texture but colorful patterns aplenty.—Adam Feldman

  • 5 out of 5 stars
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  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West

If theater is your religion, and the Broadway musical your particular sect, it’s time to rejoice. This gleefully obscene and subversive satire is one of the funniest shows to grace the Great White Way since The Producers and Urinetown. Writers Trey Parker and Matt Stone of South Park, along with composer Robert Lopez (Avenue Q), find the perfect blend of sweet and nasty for this tale of mismatched Mormon proselytizers in Uganda.—David Cote

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  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West

This John Kander–Fred Ebb–Bob Fosse favorite—revived by director Walter Bobbie and choreographer Ann Reinking—tells the saga of chorus girl Roxie Hart, who murders her lover and, with the help of a huckster lawyer, becomes a vaudeville star.—David Cote

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West

Irene Sankoff and David Hein’s swelling heart of a musical tells a true story from the aftermath of 9/11, when 38 flights were forced to land in the small town of Gander, Newfoundland. Under Christopher Ashley’s fluid direction, 12 versatile actors play dozens of roles. The show makes a persuasive case for the value of good intentions; for this kind of uplift you don’t need planes.—Adam Feldman

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  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

In Marianne Elliott’s dazzling revival of Stephen Sondheim and George Furth’s classic 1970 musical—a richly ambivalent portrait of marital life in New York City—the bachelor at the center of the show is now a woman: the charismatic Katrina Lenk. The surreal aspects of this psychological revue show are realized in designer Bunny Christie’s fantastical urban set; the excellent ensemble includes Jennifer Simard, Matt Doyle and überdiva Patti LuPone, a wonder of imperious earthiness. As the world mourns Sondheim, the brilliance and insight of his score reminds us how alive his work remains.—Adam Feldman

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West

In this captivating original musical, Hello, Dolly! scene-stealer Andrew Barth Feldman now plays the title role of a high school student thrust into social relevance after a classmate's suicide. Benj Pasek and Justin Paul's score combines well-crafted lyrics with an exciting pop sound, and Steven Levenson’s book gives all the characters shaded motives.—Adam Feldman

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West

Go to hell—and by hell we mean Hadestown, Anaïs Mitchell’s fizzy, moody, thrilling new musical. Ostensibly, at least, the show is a modern retelling of the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. But the newness of Mitchell’s score and Rachel Chavkin’s gracefully dynamic staging bring this old story to quivering life.—Adam Feldman

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West

Lin‑Manuel Miranda applies 21st-century musical storytelling to the rags-to-Treasury tale of Alexander Hamilton in this dazzlingly ingenious national sensation. It’s a success story of the best kind, breathtaking but also breath-giving: an inspiration.—Adam Feldman

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West

Director-designer Julie Taymor surrounds the Disney movie's mythic plot and Elton John–Tim Rice score with African rhythm and music. Through elegant puppetry, Taymor populates the stage with a menagerie of African beasts; her staging has expanded a simple cub into the pride of Broadway.—Adam Feldman

  • Theater
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  • Midtown West

Is Broadway ready to embrace a biographical musical portrait of Michael Jackson in the early 1990s, when the King of Pop was on his Dangerous world tour? The producers of MJ are hoping so. Created with the cooperation of Jackson's estate, the show will feature many songs by the late star's extensive catalog, with a book by two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage (Ruined) and direction and choreography by Christopher Wheeldon (An American in Paris). Newcomer Myles Frost plays the title role, with support from a cast that includes Quentin Earl Darrington, Whitney Bashor, Gabriel Ruiz and Antoine L. Smith.

Off Broadway Musicals A–Z

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
John Doyle directs a revival of Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman’s dark 1990 masterpiece about the rogues’ gallery of losers, obsessives and malcontents who have tried to kill the President of the United States. Doyle has the ammo to get the job done—a star-spangled cast of musical theater pros, including Steven Pasquale, Ethan Slater, Judy Kuhn, Will Swenson, Brandon Uranowitz and Andy Grotelueschen—but not the aim. As scattershot as this production sometimes seems, however, it hits enough targets to draw blood.—Adam Feldman
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  • Hell's Kitchen

Tariq Trotter, better known as the Roots' Black Thought, teams up with screenwriter John Ridley (12 Years a Slave) for a musical adaptation of George S. Schuyler’s satirical 1931 novel about a machine that turns Black people white. Brandon Victor Dixon—the charismatic Judas of the 2018 TV Jesus Christ Superstar—leads a talent-packed cast that also includes Lillias White, Ephraim Sykes, Tamika Lawrence, Jennifer Damiano, Tracy Shayne, Walter Bobbie, Theo Stockman and Trotter himself; Scott Elliot directs the New Group's world premiere, which is choreographed by Bill T. Jones.

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  • Theater
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  • Battery Park City

National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene and New York City Opera present tje world premiere of an opera with music by Ricky Ian Gordon (whose Intimate Apparel also premieres this monthand a libretto by Michael Korie (whose Flying Over Sunset just closed). Adapted from Giorgio Bassani’s 1962 novel—which was also the basic of a 1970 film that is considered Vittorio De Sica’s final masterwork—the piece depics an aristocratic Jewish-Italian family in denial about the rise of anti-Semitic fascism around it in the 1930s. James Lowe conducts the production, which is directed and choreographed by Richard Stafford; the cast includes Rachel Blaustein, Brian James Myer, Mary Phillips, Stephen Powell and Victor Starsky.

  • Theater
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  • West Village

Taylor Mac is a Fabergé radical—beautiful, ridiculous and full of hidden tricks—who pilots audiences through fantastical journeys, guided by the compass of his magnetic individuality. The latest is a jazz musical, with a libretto by Mac and music by Matt Ray, that expands the final hours of Socrates's life into a queer, transhistorical "ritual celebration" that explores questions of virtue. Max leads a cast of nine, directed by Niegel Smith and choreographed by Chanon Judson; the explosively imaginative Machine Dazzle designs the sets and costumes. 

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  • Theater
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  • Upper West Side

Lynn Nottage's heartbreaking 2003 drama, about a black seamstress in turn-of-the-20th-century New York and her pen-pal suitor in Panama, gets expanded into a chamber opera with music by Ricky Ian Gordon and a libretto by Nottage herself. Lincoln Center Theater resident director Bartlett Sher (South Pacific) directs, and Dianne McIntyre choreographs; the central role of Esther is played by classical soprano Kearstin Piper Brown (or Chabrelle Williams at the Wednesday and Saturday matinees).

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
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  • price 3 of 4
  • Hell's Kitchen

Musical theater does right by the jukebox with this behind-the-music tale, presenting the Four Seasons’ energetic 1960s tunes (including “Walk Like a Man” and “Big Girls Don’t Cry”) as they were meant to be performed. After an 11-year run on Broadway, the show has returned for a scaled-down open-ended run at New World Stages.—Adam Feldman

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
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  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Conrad Ricamora, Tammy Blanchard and Christian Borle star in the latest revival of this dark, tuneful and utterly winsome 1982 horror-camp musical about a flesh-eating plant who makes dreams come true for a lowly flower-shop worker. Composer Alan Menken and librettist Howard Ashman wrap a sordid tale of capitalist temptation and moral decay in layers of sweetness, humor, wit and camp. Michael Mayer directs the feeding frenzy in this deeply satisfying revival.—Adam Feldman

  • Theater
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  • Hell's Kitchen

Actor-musicians Van Hughes (Spring Awakeningand Nick Blaemire (Godspell) star in their own original musical two-hander about the relationship between canine Russian cosmonaut Laika and the scientist who trained her to be shot into orbit—and to her death—in 1957. The sharp-minded downtown director Emily Heyman (Beardooversees the mission for MCC Theater.

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Stomp
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • East Village

This shrewd garbage heap of clog dancing, prop comedy and chest-thumping percussion spins out impressive (if numbing) variations on vaudeville by way of English punk.—David Cote

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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  • Chelsea

Just in time for the holiday season, the Irish Rep has cooked up a chestnut: a tasty revival of Dion Boucicault’s 1857 melodrama The Poor of New York, transformed into a musical with original songs by director Charlotte Moore, who embraces the play's quaint sensationalism and sententiousness with open arms and a wink. It is buoyed by a talented cast of 12—Amanda Jane Cooper is a standout as a spoiled rich girl—and Linda Fisher’s splendid costumes and Hugh Landwehr’s witty set add to the charm.—Adam Feldman

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