Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right Complete A-Z list of Broadway musicals and Off Broadway musicals in NYC

Complete A-Z list of Broadway musicals and Off Broadway musicals in NYC

Our complete A-Z listings of Broadway musicals and Off Broadway musicals will help you find the best musicals in NYC

Advertising
Dear Evan Hansen
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy Dear Evan Hansen

Broadway musicals are the beating heart of New York City. Whether you're looking for unforgettable songs, spectacular sets and costumes, star turns by Broadway divas or dance numbers performed by Broadway's hottest chorus boys and girls, there is always plenty to choose from. And these days your options are more diverse than ever: raucous comedies (like The Book of Mormon), moving dramas (like Dear Evan Hansen), sweeping operettas (like The Phantom of the Opera), family classics (like The Lion King) and cultural game-changers (like Hamilton). Here is our list of every Broadway musical currently running, followed by a list of those playing in smaller Off Broadway and Off-Off Broadway venues.

RECOMMENDED: The best Broadway shows

Complete Broadway Musicals A–Z

Ain’t Too Proud—The Life and Times of the Temptations
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Ain't Too Proud—The Life and Times of The Temptations

icon-location-pin Imperial Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar

The Temptations are hard to resist: No matter how much you may chafe at the clunky machinery of Broadway’s latest jukebox biomusical, the hits just keep coming. The workmanlike script gives us Motown the Musical by way of Jersey Boys, but when the show’s lavishly gifted stars (Including Derrick Baskin and the sensational Ephraim Sykes) are moving and singing in sync, the pull of nostalgia is strong.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Theater, Musicals

Aladdin

icon-location-pin New Amsterdam Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

Disney's latest toon tuner is a tourist-family–friendly theme-park attraction, robed in the billowing fabrics of orientalist Arabian fantasy. As in the 1992 film, the Genie (a charismatic James Monroe Iglehart) steals the show from its eponymous “street rat” hero (Adam Jacobs). Stuffed with glitz, the musical is a carpet with little texture but colorful patterns aplenty.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Advertising
Beetlejuice
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Beetlejuice

icon-location-pin Winter Garden Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

If nothing else, this musical adaptation of Tim Burton’s 1988 film is spectacularly weird: Its designers come at it from all kinds of crazy angles. If only so much of the rest of the show were not a busy mess. The tone varies wildly, and the rules that govern the plot (which veers ill-advisedly widely from its source) are both overexplained and opaque.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Book of Mormon listing
Photograph: Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

The Book of Mormon

icon-location-pin Eugene O'Neill Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

If theater is your religion, and the Broadway musical your particular sect, it’s time to rejoice. This gleefully obscene and subversive satire is one of the funniest shows to grace the Great White Way since The Producers and Urinetown. Writers Trey Parker and Matt Stone of South Park, along with composer Robert Lopez (Avenue Q), find the perfect blend of sweet and nasty for this tale of mismatched Mormon proselytizers in Uganda.—David Cote

Time Out says
Advertising
Chicago
Photograph: Jeremy Daniel
Theater, Musicals

Chicago

icon-location-pin Ambassador Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

This John Kander–Fred Ebb–Bob Fosse favorite—revived by director Walter Bobbie and choreographer Ann Reinking—tells the saga of chorus girl Roxie Hart, who murders her lover and, with the help of a huckster lawyer, becomes a vaudeville star.—David Cote

Time Out says
Come From Away
Photograph: Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Come from Away

icon-location-pin Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

Irene Sankoff and David Hein’s swelling heart of a musical tells a true story from the aftermath of 9/11, when 38 flights were forced to land in the small town of Gander, Newfoundland. Under Christopher Ashley’s fluid direction, 12 versatile actors play dozens of roles. The show makes a persuasive case for the value of good intentions; for this kind of uplift you don’t need planes.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Advertising
Dear Evan Hansen
Photograph: Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

Dear Evan Hansen

icon-location-pin Music Box Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

In this captivating original musical, Hello, Dolly! scene-stealer Andrew Barth Feldman now plays the title role of a high school student thrust into social relevance after a classmate's suicide. Benj Pasek and Justin Paul's score combines well-crafted lyrics with an exciting pop sound, and Steven Levenson’s book gives all the characters shaded motives.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Freestyle Love Supreme
Photograph: Courtesy Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

Freestyle Love Supreme

icon-location-pin Booth Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar

Very talented performers perform a 90-minute storm of improvised raps and sketches, directed by Hamilton's Thomas Kail. Notable alums (such as Lin-Manuel Miranda, James Monroe Iglehart, Christopher Jackson and Daveed Diggs) may drop by for guest appearances—not that the show's core cast needs any help.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Advertising
Frozen
Photograph: Courtesy Deen van Meer
Theater, Musicals

Frozen

icon-location-pin St. James Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

There is too little magic in this lukewarm stage adaptation of the smash 2013 Disney movie about a princess who must save her realm from the eternal winter to which her witchy sister has unwittingly condemned it. There are glimmers of light in the performances and design, but the shaky plot now seems even less secure, and the show feels substantially less animated all around.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Hadestown (Broadway)
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Hadestown

icon-location-pin Walter Kerr Theatre, Midtown West
icon-calendar
Open run

Go to hell—and by hell we mean Hadestown, Anaïs Mitchell’s fizzy, moody, thrilling new musical. Ostensibly, at least, the show is a modern retelling of the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. But the newness of Mitchell’s score and Rachel Chavkin’s gracefully dynamic staging bring this old story to quivering life.—Adam Feldman

Time Out says
Show more

Off Broadway Musicals A–Z

Danyel Fulton
Photograph: Courtesy Brian Gustaveson
Theater, Musicals

Broadbend, Arkansas

icon-location-pin Duke on 42nd Street, Midtown West
icon-calendar

The Transport Group presents an original musical that follows three generations of an African-American family in the South as it grapples with questions of civil rights, economic inequality and police brutality. The music is by Ted Shen, and the libretto is by Ellen Fitzhugh and Harrison David Rivers. Jack Cummings III directs.

Peter Dinklage in Cyrano
Photograph: Courtesy Monique Carboni
Theater, Musicals

Cyrano

icon-location-pin Daryl Roth Theatre, Gramercy
icon-calendar

As a platform for the swoon-worthy Peter Dinklage, the New Group’s musical take on Edmond Rostand’s classic 1897 romance, Cyrano de Bergerac, has seductive moments. But it’s hard to fall in love with this otherwise confounding production.—Raven Snook

Time Out says
Advertising
Iris Beaumier
Photograph: Courtesy of the artist
Theater, Musicals

The Dark Star from Harlem: The Spectacular Rise of Josephine Baker

icon-location-pin La MaMa Experimental Theatre, East Village
icon-calendar

In this original musical, Iris Beaumier plays Josephine Baker, who escaped the limitations of the United States in the 1920s to become an exotic jazz sensation in Paris. The score is by Mario E. Sprouse; the book is by Glynn Borders, who also directs the world premiere.

Zal Owen
Photograph: Courtesy of the artist
Theater, Musicals

Einstein's Dreams

icon-location-pin 59E59 Theaters, Upper East Side
icon-calendar

Joanne Sydney Lessner and Joshua Rosenblum adapt Alan Lightman's best-selling 1992 novel into a musical, directed by Cara Reichel for her Prospect Theater Company. Zal Owen plays the physicist at the relatively tender age of 26, when his world-changing ideas about time and space were beginning to take full shape.

Advertising
Solea Pfeiffer
Photograph: Courtesy Ted Ely
Theater, Musicals

Evita

icon-location-pin New York City Center, Midtown West
icon-calendar

City Center revives Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's 1978 pop opera, the tale of a local girl who makes good and weds a famous man who happens to be the quasi-fascist dictator of Argentina in the 1940s. Directed by Sammi Cannold, this version eschews the epic political bent of Harold Prince's original Broadway production to focus on Eva Perón's humanity, and divides the central role between two actors: Solea Pfeiffer as the adult Eva and Maia Reficco as her younger self.

Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish

icon-location-pin Stage 42, Hell's Kitchen
icon-calendar

Folksbiene's Yiddish-language Fiddler became an unlikely hit last summer, prompting a move to a larger theater uptown. Those who get shpilkes imagining what that migration might do to Tevye the dairyman and his brethren can breathe easy. They've arrived with their stripped-down aesthetic and emotionally lucid production intact.—Raven Snook

Time Out says
Advertising
Forbidden Broadway: The Next Generation
Photograph: Courtesy Carol Rosegg
Theater, Musicals

Forbidden Broadway: The Next Generation

icon-location-pin The Triad, Upper West Side
icon-calendar

Broadway's loyal opposition, Gerard Alessandrini, returns with a new edition of his beloved satirical revue, which has ribbed the Great White Way since 1982. This latest version—the first since 2014—lays into Dear Evan HansenHadestownMoulin Rouge!Oklahoma! and other fat targets. Musical-theater lovers will be sure to eat it up.

Frankenstein: A New Musical
Photograph: Courtesy E. Sirota
Theater, Musicals

Frankenstein: A New Musical

icon-location-pin St. Luke's Theatre, Hell's Kitchen
icon-calendar

Undeterred by the failures of Frankenstein-themed tuners on Broadway and Off Broadway in 2007 (and Off-Off Broadway in 2016), composer-librettist-scientist Eric B. Sirota ventures back into the mad musical laboratory for his adaptation of Mary Shelley's classic horror novel. Clint Hromsco directs the premiere.

Advertising
The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking
Photograph: Courtesy Michael Blase
Theater, Interactive

The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking

icon-location-pin New World Stages, Hell's Kitchen
icon-calendar
Open run

[Note: The review below is for a 2014 version of this show, which was then titled The Imbible. A revised version now plays at New World Stages. A different, brunch-theater edition, titled Day Drinking, plays on weekend matinees.] Remember Bill Nye the Science Guy? Great! Now imagine him as a bartender who is deeply interested in the history of ethanol alcohol, really likes wigs and costumes, and just joined a coed barbershop quartet. That description of Anthony Caporale’s The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking may sound far-out, but the show is both educational and entertaining. (It's also a fine showcase for a cappella classics arranged by Josh Ehrlich and performed by a gifted ensemble that includes the show's director, soprano Nicole DiMattei.) Mixing whimsy and information, Caporale makes the story of our relationship with alcohol remarkably compelling. And the show's lessons—on subjects like the drinks served at Prohibition-era speakeasies, the origin of the gin and tonic, and the difference between a cocktail and a mixed drink—can be washed down with complimentary, thematically appropriate beverages. As Caporale says, “Trust me, I get funnier with every sip.” That makes the show a must-see for anyone who enjoys free booze, which is probably nearly everyone.—Amelia Bienstock  

Time Out says
The Imbible: Day Drinking
Photograph: Courtesy Broadway Theatre Studio
Theater, Musicals

The Imbible: Day Drinking—The Brunch Musical Comedy

icon-location-pin New World Stages, Hell's Kitchen
icon-calendar

Four friends explore the history of brunch and the cocktails associated with it in a musical companion piece to Anthony Caporale's popular A Spirited History of Drinking, formerly known as The Imbible. The score is by Josh Erlich; Carorale wrote the book, and codirects the show with Nicole DiMattei. Admission includes a modest brunch and three complimentary cocktails, so arrive half an hour early to take full advantage.  

Show more

More theater stories

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising