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Complete A-Z list of Broadway musicals and Off Broadway musicals in NYC

Our complete A-Z listings of Broadway musicals and Off Broadway musicals will help you find the best musicals in NYC

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Dear Evan Hansen
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy Dear Evan Hansen

Broadway musicals are the beating heart of New York City. Whether you're looking for unforgettable songs, spectacular sets and costumes, star turns by Broadway divas or dance numbers performed by Broadway's hottest chorus boys and girls, there is always plenty to choose from. And these days your options are more diverse than ever: raucous comedies (like The Book of Mormon), moving dramas (like Dear Evan Hansen), sweeping operettas (like The Phantom of the Opera), family classics (like The Lion King) and cultural game-changers (like Hamilton). Here is our lists of every Broadway musical currently running and on their way, followed by a list of those playing in smaller Off Broadway and Off-Off Broadway venues.

RECOMMENDED: The best Broadway shows

Complete Broadway Musicals A–Z

Ain’t Too Proud—The Life and Times of the Temptations
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Ain't Too Proud—The Life and Times of The Temptations

Imperial Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
3 out of 5 stars

The Temptations are hard to resist: No matter how much you may chafe at the clunky machinery of Broadway’s latest jukebox biomusical, the hits just keep coming. The workmanlike script gives us Motown the Musical by way of Jersey Boys, but when the show’s lavishly gifted stars (Including Derrick Baskin and the sensational Ephraim Sykes) are moving and singing in sync, the pull of nostalgia is strong.—Adam Feldman

Theater, Musicals

Aladdin

New Amsterdam Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
3 out of 5 stars

Disney's latest toon tuner is a tourist-family–friendly theme-park attraction, robed in the billowing fabrics of orientalist Arabian fantasy. As in the 1992 film, the Genie (a charismatic James Monroe Iglehart) steals the show from its eponymous “street rat” hero (Adam Jacobs). Stuffed with glitz, the musical is a carpet with little texture but colorful patterns aplenty.—Adam Feldman

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Beetlejuice
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Beetlejuice

Winter Garden Theatre, Midtown West
3 out of 5 stars

If nothing else, this musical adaptation of Tim Burton’s 1988 film is spectacularly weird: Its designers come at it from all kinds of crazy angles. If only so much of the rest of the show were not a busy mess. The tone varies wildly, and the rules that govern the plot (which veers ill-advisedly widely from its source) are both overexplained and opaque.—Adam Feldman

Book of Mormon listing
Photograph: Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

The Book of Mormon

Eugene O'Neill Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
5 out of 5 stars

If theater is your religion, and the Broadway musical your particular sect, it’s time to rejoice. This gleefully obscene and subversive satire is one of the funniest shows to grace the Great White Way since The Producers and Urinetown. Writers Trey Parker and Matt Stone of South Park, along with composer Robert Lopez (Avenue Q), find the perfect blend of sweet and nasty for this tale of mismatched Mormon proselytizers in Uganda.—David Cote

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Chicago
Photograph: Jeremy Daniel
Theater, Musicals

Chicago

Ambassador Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
3 out of 5 stars

This John Kander–Fred Ebb–Bob Fosse favorite—revived by director Walter Bobbie and choreographer Ann Reinking—tells the saga of chorus girl Roxie Hart, who murders her lover and, with the help of a huckster lawyer, becomes a vaudeville star.—David Cote

Come From Away
Photograph: Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Come from Away

Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
4 out of 5 stars

Irene Sankoff and David Hein’s swelling heart of a musical tells a true story from the aftermath of 9/11, when 38 flights were forced to land in the small town of Gander, Newfoundland. Under Christopher Ashley’s fluid direction, 12 versatile actors play dozens of roles. The show makes a persuasive case for the value of good intentions; for this kind of uplift you don’t need planes.—Adam Feldman

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Dear Evan Hansen
Photograph: Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

Dear Evan Hansen

Music Box Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
5 out of 5 stars

In this captivating original musical, Hello, Dolly! scene-stealer Andrew Barth Feldman now plays the title role of a high school student thrust into social relevance after a classmate's suicide. Benj Pasek and Justin Paul's score combines well-crafted lyrics with an exciting pop sound, and Steven Levenson’s book gives all the characters shaded motives.—Adam Feldman

Frozen
Photograph: Courtesy Deen van Meer
Theater, Musicals

Frozen

St. James Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
3 out of 5 stars

There is too little magic in this lukewarm stage adaptation of the smash 2013 Disney movie about a princess who must save her realm from the eternal winter to which her witchy sister has unwittingly condemned it. There are glimmers of light in the performances and design, but the shaky plot now seems even less secure, and the show feels substantially less animated all around.—Adam Feldman

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Hadestown (Broadway)
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Hadestown

Walter Kerr Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
4 out of 5 stars

Go to hell—and by hell we mean Hadestown, Anaïs Mitchell’s fizzy, moody, thrilling new musical. Ostensibly, at least, the show is a modern retelling of the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. But the newness of Mitchell’s score and Rachel Chavkin’s gracefully dynamic staging bring this old story to quivering life.—Adam Feldman

Theater, Musicals

Hamilton

Richard Rodgers Theatre, Midtown West
Open run
5 out of 5 stars

Lin‑Manuel Miranda applies 21st-century musical storytelling to the rags-to-Treasury tale of Alexander Hamilton in this dazzlingly ingenious national sensation. It’s a success story of the best kind, breathtaking but also breath-giving: an inspiration.—Adam Feldman

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Upcoming Broadway Musicals

GIRL FROM THE NORTH COUNTRY
Photograph: Courtesy Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

Girl from the North Country

Belasco Theatre, Midtown West

Playwright-director Conor McPherson weaves 20 songs by Bob Dylan into this adumbral evocation of America in the Great Depression. The songs exist in dramatic brackets; when the excellent actors sing, they usually leave the action of the play and face out to the audience, often planted at old-fashioned standing microphones. McPherson uses Dylan’s songs as atmosphere in the broadest sense: They are the air the characters breathe. After a run at the Public last season, the musical now moves to Broadway.

The cast of Six
Photograph: Courtesy Liz Lauren
Theater, Musicals

Six

Brooks Atkinson Theatre, Midtown West
Open run

The six wives of Henry VIII—two Catherines, a Katherine, two Annes and the Jane Seymour who didn't star in Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman—sing their grievances in a new musical that takes the form of a modern pop concert. Conceived in 2017 by a pair of students at Cambridge University, Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss, the show moved quickly to the Edinborough Festival Fringe and then to the West End. The Broadway version is directed by Moss and Jamie Armitage.

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Katrina Lenk in Company
Photograph: Courtesy Ahmed Klink
Theater, Musicals

Company

Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Midtown West
Open run

Stephen Sondheim and George Furth’s path-breaking 1970 musical about love in the big city has had several revivals, but this one has a twist: The commitment-averse main character is now a woman, played by The Band’s Visit’s mesmerizing Katrina Lenk. The American cast of this London transfer, directed by Marianne Elliott (Angels in America), includes Broadway über-diva Patti LuPone as well as Christopher Sieber, Christopher Fitzgerald, Claybourne Elder, Jennifer Simard, Nikki Renée Daniels and Kyle Dean Massey.

Jeanna de Waal in Diana: A New Musical
Photograph: Courtesy Little Fang
Theater, Musicals

Diana: A New Musical

Longacre Theatre, Midtown West

Uneasy lies the head that wears a tiara in this new biomusical about Diana, Princess of Wales, whose marriage to Prince Charles came undone in a sea of tabloid ugliness. Reprising the roles they played at La Jolla last year, Jeanna de Waal and Roe Hartrampf play the royal couple, flanked once again by Judy Kaye as Queen Elizabeth II and Erin Davie as Camilla Parker-Bowles. Christopher Ashley (Come from Away) directs; Joe DiPietro and David Bryan, who wrote the 2010 Tony winner Memphis, are the writers.

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Rob McClure
Photograph: Courtesy of the artist
Theater, Musicals

Mrs. Doubtfire

Stephen Sondheim Theatre, Midtown West
Open run

Broadway's love affair with men in drag continues with this musical adaptation of the 1993 movie about adivorced dad turned cross-dressed Scottish housekeeper. Adapted by Something Rotten!'s John O'Farrell and Karey and Wayne Kirkpatrick, the show is directed by musical-comedy ace Jerry Zaks (Hello, Dolly!). Rob McClure, more recently seen in Beetlejuice, fills Robin Williams's sensible shoes in the title role, joined by Jenn Gambatese, Brad Oscar and Mark Evans.

Hadden-Paton, Carmen Cusack and Tony Yazbeck
Photograph: Courtesy Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

Flying Over Sunset

Vivian Beaumont Theater (at Lincoln Center), Upper West Side

James Lapine, who co-created Into the Woods and Sunday in the Park with George, is the director and book writer of this unusual new musical about three prominent figures—the matinee idol Cary Grant, the novelist-philosopher Aldous Huxley and the playwright-politician Clare Boothe Luce—who dropped acid in the 1950s. The composer is Tom Kitt (Next to Normal), and the lyricist is Michael Korie (Grey Gardens). Carmen Cusack, Tony Yazbeck and Harry Hadden-Paton play the central roles.

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Sharon D Clarke in CAROLINE, OR CHANGE
Photograph: Courtesy Alastair Muir
Theater, Musicals

Caroline, or Change

Studio 54, Midtown West

This profoundly soulful, tuneful and transformative musical about a maid in 1963 Louisiana about was ahead of its time in 2003, but the world has caught up since. With a libretto by Tony Kushner (Angels in America) and music by Jeanine Tesori (Fun Home), this is the rare work of musical theater that can truly change the way you see the world. The show's first Broadway revival, directed by Michael Longhurst, stars Sharon D Clarke in the title role, which she played in Longhurst's West End production last season. The supporting cast includes John Cariani, Caissie Levy, Tamika Lawrence and Chip Zien.

Sing Street
Photograph: Courtesy Matthew Murphy
Theater, Musicals

Sing Street

Lyceum Theatre, Midtown West Open run

Irish playwright Enda Walsh, whose 2011 adaptation of the movie Once was a great success, returns to the well with another new musical about people making music. This one is based on John Carney's 2016 coming-of-age film about hardscrabble youths who form a rock band in 1980s Dublin. Rebecca Taichman (Indecent) directs, and Sonya Tayeh (Moulin Rouge!) choreographs; the songs are by Carney and Gary Clark, who was the frontman for the 1980s Scottish rock band Danny Wilson.

Off Broadway Musicals A–Z

Duncan Sheik
Photograph: Courtesy Shervin Lainez
Theater, Musicals

Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice

Pershing Square Signature Center, Hell's Kitchen

Playwright Jonathan Marc Sherman (Things We Want) teams with songwriter Duncan Sheik (Spring Awakening), with an assist from lyricist Amanda Green, for this musical adaptation of Paul Mazursky's swinging 1969 comedy about sexual liberation and potential mate-swapping. Scott Elliott directs for his New Group; Jennifer Damiano, Ana Nogueira, Joél Pérez and Michael Segan play the titular foursome. 

Boom
Photograph: Courtesy Paul Lampert
Theater, Musicals

Boom

59E59 Theaters, Upper East Side

Canadian writer-director-performer Rick Miller plays more than 100 politicians, activists and musicians in a survey of 25 years that defined baby boomer culture. Some 28 songs are woven into a narrative that centers on Miller's mother and her relationship with an African-American draft dodger.

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Adam Kantor
Photograph: Courtesy of the artist
Theater, Musicals

Darling Grenadine

Roundabout Underground, Midtown West

Roundabout Underground makes a rare foray into musical theater with Daniel Zaitchik's intimate portrait of a complicated romance between a songwriter and chorus girl. The cast of five, directed by Michael Berresse, includes Adam Kantor, Emily Walton and Jay Armstrong Johnson.

Justine Aronson
Photograph: Courtesy Joshua Lipton
Theater, Musicals

Das Barbecü

Hill Country, Flatiron

On Site Opera, which stages modern operas in uncoventional locations, ranges into opera-themed musical theater with this revival of Jim Luigs and Scott Warrender's campy 1991 tuner, which moves the action of Wagner's Götterdämmerung to modern-day Texas. Appropriately enough, the show is being mounted at Hill Country. (We recommend the moist brisket and the Kreuz jalapeño cheese sausage.) Five singer-actors perform all the roles, conducted by Emily Senturia and directed by Eric Einhorn and Katherine M. Carter. 

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Ann Harada
Photograph: Courtesy of the artist
Theater, Musicals

Emojiland The Musical

Duke on 42nd Street, Midtown West
3 out of 5 stars

Keith Harrison and Laura Schein's quirky musical boasts a strong cast of pros playing internet hieroglyphs, including Lesli Margherita and Josh Lamon (as Princess and Prince), George Abud (as Nerd Face) and Ann Harada (as Pile of Poo). Their good old-fashioned analog performances prevent the show from crashing.

 

Forbidden Broadway: The Next Generation
Photograph: Courtesy Carol Rosegg
Theater, Musicals

Forbidden Broadway: The Next Generation

York Theatre Company at St. Peter's Church, Midtown East
3 out of 5 stars

The Great White Way has changed a lot over the past four decades, but Forbidden Broadway is still much the same. That’s both a comfort and a limitation. In the first new edition since 2014 of his (mostly) affectionate satirical revue, musical parodist Gerard Alessandrini takes fresh aim at Broadway’s newcomers. As usual, he ends up with as many misses as hits.—Raven Snook

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Frankenstein: A New Musical
Photograph: Courtesy E. Sirota
Theater, Musicals

Frankenstein: A New Musical

St. Luke's Theatre, Hell's Kitchen

Undeterred by the failures of Frankenstein-themed tuners on Broadway and Off Broadway in 2007 (and Off-Off Broadway in 2016), composer-librettist-scientist Eric B. Sirota ventures back into the mad musical laboratory for his adaptation of Mary Shelley's classic horror novel. Clint Hromsco directs the premiere.

The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking
Photograph: Courtesy Michael Blase
Theater, Interactive

The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking

New World Stages, Hell's Kitchen
Open run
4 out of 5 stars

[Note: The review below is for a 2014 version of this show, which was then titled The Imbible. A revised version now plays at New World Stages. A different, brunch-theater edition, titled Day Drinking, plays on weekend matinees.] Remember Bill Nye the Science Guy? Great! Now imagine him as a bartender who is deeply interested in the history of ethanol alcohol, really likes wigs and costumes, and just joined a coed barbershop quartet. That description of Anthony Caporale’s The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking may sound far-out, but the show is both educational and entertaining. (It's also a fine showcase for a cappella classics arranged by Josh Ehrlich and performed by a gifted ensemble that includes the show's director, soprano Nicole DiMattei.) Mixing whimsy and information, Caporale makes the story of our relationship with alcohol remarkably compelling. And the show's lessons—on subjects like the drinks served at Prohibition-era speakeasies, the origin of the gin and tonic, and the difference between a cocktail and a mixed drink—can be washed down with complimentary, thematically appropriate beverages. As Caporale says, “Trust me, I get funnier with every sip.” That makes the show a must-see for anyone who enjoys free booze, which is probably nearly everyone.—Amelia Bienstock  

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Jersey Boys
Photograph: Courtesy Joan Marcus
Theater, Musicals

Jersey Boys

New World Stages, Hell's Kitchen
Open run

Musical theater does right by the jukebox with this behind-the-music tale, presenting the Four Seasons’ energetic 1960s tunes (including “Walk Like a Man” and “Big Girls Don’t Cry”) as they were meant to be performed. After an 11-year run on Broadway, the show has returned for a scaled-down open-ended run at New World Stages.—Adam Feldman

Gideon Glick as Seymour in LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS
Photograph: Courtesy Emilio Madrid
Theater, Musicals

Little Shop of Horrors

Westside Theatre, Hell's Kitchen
4 out of 5 stars

 

Arguably the best musical ever adapted from a movie, Little Shop of Horrors is a weird and adorable show with teeth. Librettist Howard Ashman and composer Alan Menken brilliantly wrap a sordid tale of capitalist temptation and moral decay in layers of sweetness, humor, wit and camp. To populate this parable, director Michael Mayer has wrangled a marvelous cast led by Gideon Glick, Tammy Blanchard and Christian Borle. 

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