Morgan Heritage At Terminal West

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Morgan Heritage At Terminal West
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Terminal West At King Plow says
Doors 8
Show 9
$18 ADV / $25 DOS
18+

The Royal Family of Reggae Morgan Heritage
Nearly two decades and ten albums later, the mission has come full circle for Morgan Heritage. Globally known as the "Royal Family of Reggae," and now today being dubbed as the "Rolling Stones of Reggae" (in large part due to the act's electric stage shows), Morgan Heritage has established themselves as the premiere live group on the reggae circuit. From an extraordinarily talented teen quintet to one of contemporary reggae's most powerful forces, Peetah Morgan (vocals), Una Morgan (keyboard/vocals), Roy "Gramps" Morgan (keyboard/vocals), Nakhamyah "Lukes" Morgan (rhythm guitar) and Memmalatel "Mr. Mojo" Morgan (percussion/vocals) are back with Here Come The Kings —the collective's first musical arrangement in five years. The band's latest studio album on VP Records will "stimulate the minds of the people and let them know what we've created, it's real," proclaims Peetah Morgan, the group's lead vocalist. Prepare for the revolution.

After respective solo careers and music ventures of their own over the last five years, Morgan Heritage returns this spring with their groundbreaking album Here Come The Kings. Lyrically, Here Come The Kings is a refresher course for culture music fans, staying true to Morgan Heritage's authentic Rockaz style, with brilliant instrumentation and empowering lyrics. However, collaborations with ingenious young blood producers like Lamar Brown (Notice Productions), Shane C. Brown (Juke Boxx Productions) and multiple Grammy nominee, Jason "J-­‐Vibe" Farmer, lead the band to explore new sounds that successfully fuse roots, r&b, and a hint of dancehall, evident on cuts like "Perfect Love Song" and "The Girl is Mine."

"Roots Reggae is alive and well outside of the island of Jamaica," Gramps passionately declares, as he expounds on the band's continued commitment to heal the world through music. "It's not about changing the message," which unfailingly has been one of love, dignity, respect, and praising Jah, "but delivering the message to a new generation," a population that the tight-­‐ knit tribe believes has strayed away from the island's rich culture. "Shabba, Shaggy, these people captivated foreign markets because they were different," explains Peetah, "but still 100% Jamaican." "Reggae artists need to realize that what we do is precious. We must value what we have because the public wants us for who we are."
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By: Terminal West At King Plow

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