Patricia Bell Scott, The Firebrand And The First Lady: Portrait Of A Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, And The Struggle For Socia

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Patricia Bell Scott, The Firebrand And The First Lady: Portrait Of A Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, And The Struggle For Socia
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Patricia Bell Scott, The Firebrand And The First Lady: Portrait Of A Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, And The Struggle For Socia says
Pauli Murray first saw Eleanor Roosevelt in 1933, at the height of the Depression, at a government-sponsored, 200-acre camp for unemployed women where Murray, the granddaughter of a mulatto slave, was living. The First Lady had pushed her husband to set up the camp in her effort to do what she could for working women and the poor. Roosevelt, whose ancestry gave her membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution, drove up one day unannounced, her secretary and a Secret Service agent her passengers. To Murray, then 23, Roosevelt’s self-assurance was a symbol of women’s independence, one that influenced her life.

Five years later, Murray, an aspiring writer, wrote a letter to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt protesting racial segregation in the South. Mrs. Roosevelt wrote back. So began a friendship between the First Lady and Murray – who would become a renowned poet, intellectual rebel, principal strategist in the fight to preserve Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, cofounder of the National Organization for Women, and the first African American female Episcopal priest. Two decades in the works, Patricia Bell-Scott’s chronicle shows how their enduring friendship helped alter the course of race relations in America.

Patricia Bell-Scott is Professor Emerita of women’s studies and human development and family science at the University of Georgia. Her previous books include Life Notes: Personal Writings by Contemporary Black Women, Flat-Footed Truths: Telling Black Women’s Lives, and Double Stitch: Black Women Write About Mothers & Daughters, which won the Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Prize.

Admission for all lectures is $5 members, $10 nonmembers, and free to AHC Insiders unless otherwise noted.
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By: Atlanta History Center

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