Top art exhibitions in Barcelona right now

These are the art exhibitions on in Barcelona's museums and galleries that you won't want to miss
© David Douglas Duncan. Fotografia Arxiu Museu Picasso, Barcelona © Successió Pablo Picasso, VEGAP, Madrid 2018 La cuina de Picasso
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Calling all lovers of painting, photography, sculpture, and art in general: this is your Time Out selection of the best exhibitions on in Barcelona's museums and galleries right now.

Barcelona's best art exhibitions

1
Salvador Dali. Retrat de Gala amb dues costelles de xai en equilibri sobre la seva espatlla, 1934
© Fundació Gala-Salvador Dali Figueres
Art

Gala Salvador Dalí. A Room of One's Own in Púbol

icon-location-pin Sants - Montjuïc
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This exhibition explores the life of Gala, known the world over as Salvador Dalí's wife, muse and subject of many of his paintings. An enigmatic and intuitive woman who was part of the circle of many artists and intellectuals. You can see her transformation into an artist in her own right, as the couple worked artistically together, she shared authorship of some of Dalí's works.

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2
Antoni Tàpies. Biografia política
© Augustin de Valence
Art

Antoni Tàpies. Political Biography

icon-location-pin Dreta de l'Eixample
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We are before an extraordinary set of artworks by Antoni Tàpies from the period 1946-1977; that is, the beginning of his painting career through to the restoration of the Catalan government. Some 70 impressive works set off a rereading of the artist's corpus in the light of the 21st century, and re-create a civic awareness. In the exhibition there are classics worthy of any Tàpies anthology, such as the inks and works alluding to concrete events. There are also gimmicky works that perhaps don't quite withstand the passage of time. But in all of them we can sense his capacity for action and politics.

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3
La cuina de Picasso
© David Douglas Duncan. Fotografia Arxiu Museu Picasso, Barcelona © Successió Pablo Picasso, VEGAP, Madrid 2018
Art

Picasso's Kitchen

icon-location-pin Ciutat Vella
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Two tiny oil paintings from the Picasso family kitchen in Málaga open the exhibition, and it finishes with the artist's monumental kitchen as it was in 1948. Since you know you're definitely going to the exhibition, here's a bit of advice, if you have the time to follow it: You know how you don't eat everything on the menu when you go to a restaurant? Well, you may just have to put your gluttonous tendencies aside here too. If you really want to see the masterpieces that have been sent over expressly from Paris or those from the archives of Picasso's relatives – especially the works from the Cubist period – do it, and savour them. You can go back another day and see the rest, as the show is on until the end of September.

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4
'Mirrors', de Kader Attia
© Kader Attia
Art, Sculpture

Kader Attia. Scars Remind Us That Our Past Is Real

icon-location-pin Sants - Montjuïc
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The Japanese 'kintsugi' technique involves restoring broken ceramic pieces with a type of gold varnish. It's done to transform a cracked object into a unique element, making the fissures stand out. It's more than a reconstruction procedure, it's a philosophy of life: dealing with trauma as a way to achieve catharsis and overcome pain. The work of French-Algerian artist Kader Attia, winner of the latest edition of the Joan Miró Prize, looks at different scenes of suffering and reparation. This first Attia monographic in Spain is a highly emotional one indeed.

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5
Antoni Tàpies
Art

Black Light. Secret traditions in art since the 1950s

icon-location-pin El Raval
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Are you a fan of the show 'Supernatural'? Do you find those tests for colour blindness irresistibly pleasing? Do you say no to smoking joints but you love a bit of ayahuasca now and then? Then 'Black Light' is the exhibition for you! You can take this exhaustive exhibition at face value, as its title indicates, 'Secret traditions in art since the 1950s', or you can wind your way through the corridors of the CCCB as if you were in a supermarket that sells esoteric, psychedelic, alter-anthropological and highly countercultural art.The show, arranged in a more or less chronological order, features incredibly intriguing pieces by renowned artists and experimental cinematographers.

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6
Saul Leiter, Taxi, 1957
© Saul Leiter Foundation
Art

Saul Leiter. In Search of Beauty

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This exhibition is dedicated to the work of American artist Saul Leiter, who was one of the early adopters of working with colour photography. Leiter combined photography and painting his whole life, and he was still painting daily until he died in November 2013 at the age of 89. But the camera was the medium that helped him capture and interpret live in New York City in many-layered compositions as well as intimate scenes as nobody had done before. Leiter also played an important role in the formation of the New York school of photography in the 1940s and 1950s.

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7
La fotografia 'creativa' a Catalunya (1973-1982)
Art

'Creative' photography in Catalonia (1973-1982)

icon-location-pin El Raval
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This exhibition presents the rise of a generation of photographers who demanded that ‘creative’ or fine-art photography be accepted as an art in its own right by the institutional and artistic system during the 1970s and early 1980s. It ranges from the opening of Spectrum, the first gallery in Spain to specialise in photography, inaugurated in Barcelona in 1973, to the Primavera Fotogràfica (Springtime of Photography), held in Barcelona in 1982.

8
Martin Parr. FRANCE. Paris. Louvre. 2012.
Art

A Certain Darkness

icon-location-pin La Font de la Guatlla
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One morning in August 1911, in Paris, someone entered the Louvre Museum, picked up the painting 'La Gioconda' and took it without anyone noticing. The exhibition 'Una Certa Foscor' ('A Certain Darkness') takes as a symbolic starting point the black and empty space left behind by the stolen painting to speculate on the question of the eye and the image in relation to the  practice of art. It brings together a selection of 14 artworks and documents that explore the ideas of opacity, concealment and absence in the artistic practice, and invites us to think about the how viewers take in art and about the current ways of seeing – and not seeing – images.

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9
Francesc Torres
© Maria Dias
Art

Francesc Torres. The Hermetic Bell. Space for a Non-Transferable Anthropology

icon-location-pin El Raval
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Catalan artist Francesc Torres unpacks his personal archive at the MACBA in an exhibition that becomes a room of marvels with all kinds of objects and documents, from pages out of 1950s American magazines to boxes of toy cars and iron recovered from the Ebro battlefield. Torres has worked in installations, videos and drawings. His new project for the MACBA is unfinished and will be completed by students of the Independent Studies Programme. According to Torres, it's 'like an act of love for art'.

10
Patricio Vélez. Las formas del tiempo
Art

Patricio Vélez. Las formas del tiempo

icon-location-pin Dreta de l'Eixample
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'Las formas del tiempo' ('The shapes of time') is an exhibition of works by Patricio Vélez (Quito, Ecuador, 1945) that an exhaustive panorama of his artistic career for the first time. The show brings together a selection of nearly 100 pieces, including drawings, paintings, engravings and photographs that bring us closer to his particular view of the world. His work serves as a mechanism for the reconstruction of personal memory, which bundles the experiences of so many trips and encounters, real and imaginary.

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