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David Ehrlich

David Ehrlich

David Ehrlich is Time Out's former New York Associate Film Editor.

Articles (36)

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

A few years ago, a debate arose on social media about sex scenes in movies. ‘Sex scenes in movies are usually completely unnecessary, add nothing to the plot or character development, and just make me feel uncomfortable’, one Reddit user boldly stated. It seemed like an opinion that would instantly get shouted down by the commentariat. Instead, the vast majority of responses agreed with the post.  Well, allow us to retort, in 101 different ways. It’s certainly true that, in some ways, sex is superfluous. Those are what we call ‘bad movies’. You won’t find any of them on this list of cinema’s greatest sex scenes. What you will find are examples of sex as character development, or sex as a significant plot point. In some cases, sex is a punchline. In others, it’s downright horrifying. Indeed, cinematic sex is sometimes designed to make you feel uncomfortable. Other times, it’s simply meant to be arousing. And even if it only exists for pure titillation, there’s value in that, too. Turn off the lights, take the phone off the hook and slip into something more comfortable. Here are the 101 best sex scenes of all time. As the man once said: let’s get it on. Written by Dave Calhoun, Joshua Rothkopf, Cath Clarke, David Ehrlich, Phil de Semlyen, Daniel Walber, Trevor Johnston, Andy Kryza, Daniel Walber & Matthew Singer Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time❤ The 100 best romantic films of all-time😬 The 50 most controversial movies ever made💪 The 100 best feminist films of a

The 100 best animated films of all time

The 100 best animated films of all time

Long before your love of sci-fi or romantic movies took wing, we’re betting you were friendly with talking animals. Chances are, the first movie you saw was animated: a Disney movie or a toon about a pig on TV. Animation is where we call come from, as we learn the building blocks of narrative storytelling from the simplest forms. But the genre has long been a refuge for adults as well. In researching the best animated movies ever made, we encountered plenty of Oscar winners, along with darkly imaginative foreign films from Japan, France and beyond. Our polled experts included Fantastic Mr. Fox’s Wes Anderson and Wallace & Gromit’s Nick Park. Dive in to our authoritative list and you’ll find nostalgia and new horizons alike. Written by Trevor Johnston, David Ehrlich, Joshua Rothkoph, Tom Huddleston, Andy Kryza, Guy Lodge, Dave Calhoun, Keith Uhlich and Cath Clarke. RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

The 100 best horror movies of all time

The 100 best horror movies of all time

There’s a lot of patter about how we live in a golden age of fright. Boutique distributor A24 has become the paragon of ‘elevated horror‘ thanks to the elegant scares of Hereditary, The Witch and Saint Maude. Indie darlings like David Gordon Green have taken the reins of the Halloween and Exorcist franchises. James Wan keeps cranking out blockbuster funhouse fare like The Conjuring. Jim from the American Office has become a horror icon thanks to his A Quiet Place franchise and former sketch-comedy headliner Jordan Peele netted an Oscar by tapping Rod Sterling and The Stepford Wives for the zeitgeisty Get Out.  But the truth is, horror’s golden age has spanned the entire lifetime of cinema, eternally lurking in the shadows like Count Orlok and tempting more respectable cineastes to live deliciously by indulging in their baser emotions. Video Nasties and seedy B-movies have been reappraised as brilliant. Slasher films have been re-evaluated as art. And genre filmmakers like Wes Craven and John Carpenter have been elevated to the same storied tier as genre forebears like Michael Powell and Hitchcock… directors whose credentials belied a bloodlust that shocked audiences like a maniac lurking behind the shower curtain.  As with our picks of the best comedy movies or best thrillers, the below list is a proper smorgasbord of horror movies, including genre-busting science fiction like Alien and murderous serial killer thrillers such as The Silence of the Lambs. The list is also full

The 50 best gangster movies of all time

The 50 best gangster movies of all time

To borrow a phrase, as far back as anyone can remember, Hollywood always wanted to be a gangster. Or at least to wallow among them. Cinema’s history is littered with criminals beckoning viewers to spend a couple hours on the wrong side of the tracks. Whether it’s with killers in three-piece suits, street-level gangbangers or yakuza enforcers with a four-fingered chokehold on the supply chain seems irrelevant. We all want a seat at the table, and a great gangster film lets you live like Henry Hill without all that coke-addled paranoia and pesky witness protection.  Call it an offer you can't refuse, a Sicilian message or a pair of cement shoes: the gangster film has an ironclad lock on the hearts of movie lovers. Some of Hollywood's finest exports are crime sagas, and the indie and foreign-film worlds boast classics of their own. Gritty or romantic, coolly silent or loaded with tough talk, these are the films where crime pays. Join us for a tour of the speakeasies, gambling dens, back alleys and knocked-off bank vaults of cinema’s criminal underworlds.Written by Dave Calhoun, Cath Clarke, David Ehrlich, Zach Long, Andy Kryza, Tom Huddleston, Joshua Rothkopf & Phil de Semlyen

The 15 best sex scenes with no sex in them

The 15 best sex scenes with no sex in them

When it comes right down to it, our list of the 100 best movie sex scenes really told only half of the story. Cinema is an inherently visual medium, but so much of its power them stems from the things we don’t see. Basic Instinct may have been groundbreaking, but a quick flash of the goods isn’t especially hot. Showgirls may have earned that NC-17, but none of it is as steamy as the cut from a kiss to a train plunging into a tunnel at the end of Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest. Movies, like sex, exist first and foremost in the imagination, so it’s no surprise that many of their most memorably erotic moments do away with the deed altogether. Here are 15 of the sexiest film moments that didn't need sex to go all the way. RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movie sex scenes ever made

10 actors who turn sex scenes into art

10 actors who turn sex scenes into art

They may be few and far between, but a handful of movie stars have shown a consistent interest in making sure that sex—actual, complicated, unashamed sex—isn’t entirely relegated to the art house. This list features women who have been dropped into an industry that institutionally exploits their sexuality, but have still managed to inhabit sex scenes on their own terms. You can also find men here who were granted the power to subvert Hollywood’s calcified gender dynamics, and did exactly that. RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movie sex scenes ever made

The 100 best horror films - the scariest movies ranked by experts

The 100 best horror films - the scariest movies ranked by experts

Horror cinema is a monster. Mistreated, misunderstood and subjected to vicious critical attacks, somehow it keeps lumbering forward, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake. For some, horror films are little better than pornography, focused purely on evoking a reaction – be it terror, disquiet or disgust – with little thought for 'higher' aspirations. For others, they're just a bit of fun: a chance to shriek and snigger at someone's second-hand nightmare. But look again, and the story of horror is also the story of innovation and non-conformity in cinema, a place where dangerous ideas can be expressed, radical techniques can be explored, and filmmakers outside the mainstream can still make a big cultural splash. If cinema itself has an unconscious, a dark little corner from which new ideas emerge, blinking and malformed, it must be horror. The question is – which are the best horror films? Time Out proudly presents the 100 best horror films, as chosen by those who write in, direct, star in and celebrate the genre. For more, check out our guides to the best comedy, rom coms, family and animated movies.

The absolute best sex scenes of all time

The absolute best sex scenes of all time

What are the greatest movie sex scenes? The ones you really don’t want to come on when you’re enjoying a quiet night in front of the telly with your parents? It can be tough to avoid. From cinema’s seemingly chaste early days through a century-and-a-bit of shadowy film noirs, swooning romances, erotically charged ’80s thrillers and just about every film with Marlon Brando in, sex is there, ready to engulf us in its sweaty embrace. Some filmmakers chose to cut tastefully around the deed itself; some have thrown caution (and clothes) to the wind to let it all hang out. Others, like Michael Winterbottom with his explicit indie bonk-athon 9 Songs, take it even further. We’ve put together 101 of the most groundbreaking sex scenes of all time to chart how the movies have chosen to put the moves on. A fair few of these films have won Academy Awards; some are classic feminist movies; controversy has stalked many of them. Let us know which ones we’re missing.RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

The 101 best sex scenes of all time

Nooky. Rumpy pumpy. Slap and tickle. Fourth base. La whoopsy-daisy. Whatever you call it, sex runs through cinema like an electric charge. From its seemingly chaste early days through a century-and-a-bit of shadowy film noirs, swooning romances, erotically charged ’80s thrillers and just about every film with Marlon Brando in – up to and very much excluding Apocalypse Now – it’s there, ready to spark chemistry into actual fireworks. Some filmmakers chose to cut tastefully around the deed itself; some have thrown caution (and clothes) to the wind to show it in all its glory. Others, like Nagisa Oshima with his notoriously explicit In the Realm of the Senses, take it even further. We’ve put together 101 of the most groundbreaking sex scenes of all time to chart how the movies have chosen to put the moves on. A fair few of these films have won Academy Awards; some are classic feminist movies; controversy has stalked many of them. Let us know which ones we’re missing.RECOMMENDED: Our list of the 100 best movies of all time

15個最想入非非的電影情節

15個最想入非非的電影情節

當你看到這個熟悉又類似的標題,是否記得我們之前介紹過的香港最火辣電影?那其實只是一半有關火辣電影的故事罷了! 雖然電影是一種視覺媒介,但往往在我們看不到的畫面時,卻能引伸更多意義。如1992年上映的電影《本能》,曾在黑色色情電影界引起很大迴響,可惜後繼無力。愛,有時就跟電影一樣,有很大的想像空間,因此很多時候令歡眾留下最令難忘的時刻、甚至變成永恆的時刻,並不是那最赤裸裸的床戲場面。 以下15個令人最想入非非的電影片段,沒有震撼的床上戲,也會令人着迷地看下去。

The 15 best sex scenes with no sex in them

The 15 best sex scenes with no sex in them

When it comes right down to it, our list of Hong Kong’s sexiest movies really told only half of the story. Cinema is an inherently visual medium, but so much of its power them stems from the things we don’t see. Basic Instinct may have been groundbreaking, but a quick flash of the goods isn’t especially hot. Movies, like sex, exist first and foremost in the imagination, so it’s no surprise that many of their most memorably erotic moments do away with the deed altogether. Here are 15 of the sexiest film moments that didn't need sex to go all the way.If you want more Hong Kong movies, be sure to check out our guide to the top 100 Hong Kong movies ever made.

7 things you need to know about Xavier Dolan

7 things you need to know about Xavier Dolan

Raw as an open wound, the films of Quebec’s Xavier Dolan marry the go-for-broke exuberance of a young man with the control of a master. Mommy, his chronicle of the turbulent relationship between an unhinged teenager (Antoine-Olivier Pilon) and his brash single mother (Anne Dorval), is framed against a fictional Canadian law in which parents can disown their misbehaving kids. Shot in a perfectly square aspect ratio that makes the film look like an Instagram photo, Mommy would be a sensational effort from a director of any age.But Dolan is 25. And if that weren't impressive enough, it's already his fifth feature–and his fourth to premiere at Cannes. We recently sat down with the excitable kid (who'd rather talk Titanic than Jean-Luc Godard) in a swank Soho hotel to see what we could learn about the most preternaturally talented filmmaker since Orson Welles.He doesn't do his homework.“I remember when I showed Tom at the Farm to [Mommy actor] Suzanne Clément. She was living at my place at the time, and we had a blast spending Christmas together watching all of Friday Night Lights and a lot of Hitchcock films, because I had seen none. She was like, ‘Um, you’ve done a movie that seems very inspired by Hitchcock, and when people ask you about it, you can’t tell them you haven’t seen any Hitchcock, because you will look stupid. So let’s go to the video store and buy you a box set.’ ”He doesn't obey the law.“Correctional centers do not expel kids, but that isn’t the case in Mommy. I r

Listings and reviews (28)

エヴォリューション

エヴォリューション

4 out of 5 stars

ルシール・アザリロヴィック監督が描いた、忘れがたいほど奇異な物語の舞台となったのは、フランス沖のどこかにある人里離れた島だ。その島では、白い眉と黒い瞳を持った女性たちが少年たちを育てており、父親たちはどこにも見当たらない。昼には少年たちが珊瑚礁の広がる海へ泳ぎに行き、夜になると母親が彼らにドロドロに凝固したイカ墨のような液体を食べさせ、痩せ細った腕に薬と称する催眠作用のある粘液を注射する。ある夜、好奇心旺盛な少年ニコラ(マックス・ブラバン)は、なんとか投薬に耐え、母親(ジュリー=マリー・パルマンティエ)と暮らす質素な家から抜け出す。そして、彼が母親を追って海岸に出たところから、すべては奇妙な方向に進み始めるのだ。 少女たちの世界を描いた映画『エコール』を発表してから10年たったが、ルシール・アザリロヴィック監督は、まるでその間ずっと悪夢を溜め込んでいたかのように思える。長時間にわたる言葉のない静寂、恐怖をともなう緊迫、抽象的な映像美が描かれる本作には、ニコラが夜に抱く好奇心と、我々に根付いた原始的な不安をもって、その暗く神秘的な世界を見つめていた。物語の大筋が理解しやすく描かれながらも、美しい海の映像とデヴィッド・クローネンバーグ的なボディホラーが渦巻くなかで、そのドラマチックな質問に対する答えは海底に沈んでいく。 もし本作のテーマに一貫性があるとすれば、ルシール・アザリロヴィック監督が自律性を持つ男性の身体を裸にする傾向だろう。女性のキャラクターは、いわゆる意図を隠し持つ妖婦であり、夫や息子が感じる一般的な不安から生まれている。出産の不安というものを本来は無視する余裕があるべき性別に強制させることで、最もおぞましい場面が描かれていた。本作で遠回しに描かれるのは、想像と現実の境界が曖昧で、自分が理解できないものはすべて素晴らしいと同時に恐ろしいと感じた幼少時代への回帰だろう。 公式サイトはこちら 2016年11月26日(土)渋谷アップリンクほか全国順次公開 テキスト:DAVID EHRLICH 翻訳:小山瑠美

Taxi Teherán

Taxi Teherán

5 out of 5 stars

Los golpes bajos que ha recibido el director Jafar Panahi por parte del gobierno iraní, sólo lo han hecho más fuerte de lo que ellos pudieran imaginar. Le prohibieron hacer películas y lo arrestaron sin fundamentos por crímenes contra la seguridad nacional; sin embargo, desde que fue condenado hace cinco años, el realizador ha exportado exitosamente tres obras maestras. Aunque Taxi Teherán no tiene la crudeza y furia de Esto no es un película (2011) y su origen no tiene una increíble historia —el material se cargó en una USB y salió de Irán en un pastel clandestinamente—, esta ágil, fuerte e incansable forma de levantar el dedo medio a la censura es el desafío más audaz que Panahi ha mostrado hasta ahora. Como reflejo de la cinematografía iraní por los autos y al ser sus únicas propiedades, que simultáneamente son un espacio público y privado, la película encuentra a Panahi detrás del volante de un taxi del centro de Teherán. Filmado para lucir como un documental (pero demasiado incisivo y con muchos diálogos del conductor como para hacerse pasar por uno), Taxi Teherán transforma lentamente el carro de Panahi en un escenario de crímenes, confesiones, declaraciones de lecho de muerte e incluso una tragedia relacionada con peces de colores. Cada pasajero que sube a la celda móvil nota rápidamente la cámara montada en el tablero, pero a ninguno le causa conflicto (no se da crédito al elenco para proteger sus identidades). De hecho, la mayoría tiene sus propias cámaras y miran al

A Poem Is A Naked Person

A Poem Is A Naked Person

5 out of 5 stars

This long-lost Leon Russell doc was shot between 1972 and 1974, but has been buried for more than 40 years – after the country-rock legend baulked at the finished product. Now it’s been lovingly remastered by director Les Blank’s son (after he connected with Russell on Facebook). The movie hasn’t just been worth the wait; it’s been transformed by it. In the ’70s, this would have been an unusually intimate tour portrait. Now, it’s a newly unearthed time capsule. It’s immediately clear that Blank was less interested in Russell than in the vibrant community that orbited around him (there’s a reason why the musician’s name is missing from the film’s title). The director is smitten with artist Jim Franklin, seen sweeping out an empty swimming pool of baby scorpions so he can paint a huge mural. Elsewhere, Blank’s attention is seduced by a controlled demolition in Tulsa and a glass-eating parachute enthusiast (rumoured to be the elusive plane hijacker DB Cooper). There’s enough concert footage here to please diehard fans, but Blank is more attuned to the sweat and musk of each performance than to the songs. One moment, his camera is perching on Russell’s shoulder as he pounds out the honky-tonk piano melody of ‘Tight Rope’; the next, it steals a close-up of the unembarrassed ecstasy of someone in the crowd. Maybe big-bearded Russell was annoyed that the film turned out to be an ode to his scene rather than a testament to his genius. Or maybe, in the years since, he’s learned to app

Right Now, Wrong Then

Right Now, Wrong Then

4 out of 5 stars

Korean auteur Hong Sang-soo (Turning Gate) has a reputation for repeating himself. With few exceptions, each of his droll comedies has followed a bumbling, lonely male director as he travels to a film festival, gets tanked on soju and awkwardly throws himself at a woman. Hong, however, is well aware of his formula, and his cheeky new movie pokes terrific fun at the tired criticisms. The first half of Right Now, Wrong Then fits the usual mold, but the real joke begins when the movie abruptly starts over and our hero—seemingly aware of his Groundhog Day do-over—makes subtly different (and smarter) choices the second time around in a rich and playful revision.

The Meddler

The Meddler

4 out of 5 stars

Imagine ‘Clueless’ starring Susan Sarandon as an overbearing mum and you’re in the right ballpark for ‘The Meddler’, a sweet portrait of a woman coming to terms with losing the love of her life. Sarandon plays Marnie, a recent widow who uproots from New Jersey to Los Angeles to be closer to her depressed screenwriter daughter Lori (Rose Byrne). But when Lori finds her mum’s affection suffocating, Marnie has no choice but to mother somebody else. Or, in this case, everybody else, beginning with one of the Genius Bar technicians at her local Apple store (Jerrod Carmichael), whom she befriends and starts driving to night school.  With a plot that plays like a string of incidental encounters, ‘The Meddler’ could easily have felt like a glorified sitcom. But Sarandon delivers a exuberant performance with care and conviction.  Marnie’s grief, her goodness and her complicated relationship with her daughter all feel so lived-in and true – perhaps not surprisingly, given that director Lorene Scafaria (who wrote the script for ‘Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist’) based the character on her own mum.

Évolution

Évolution

4 out of 5 stars

Lucile Hadzihalilovic’s unforgettably unsettling new film, ‘Evolution’, is set on an island somewhere off the coast of France. This is a place where single women raise a generation of young boys without fathers (nowhere to be seen). During the days, the boys go swimming. At night, their mothers feed them a mush of squid ink and inject their skinny arms with a vile sleep-inducing goop they call ‘medicine’. One evening, a curious kid called Nicolas (Max Brebant) dodges his dose, slipping out of the house he shares with his mum (Julie-Marie Parmentier). He follows her to the beach, and that’s when things start to get weird. It’s been a decade since Hadžihalilović’s first film, 2005’s ‘Innocence’, and it seems as though she has been hoarding her nightmares ever since. Tense with terror and told with abstractly beautiful imagery across long stretches of wordless quiet, ‘Evolution’ watches its dark and mysterious world with the same curiosity that keeps Nicolas awake at night. The movie flirts with the outline of a proper plot, but the answers to its dramatic questions sink to the ocean floor. If ‘Evolution’ has a theme running through it, it’s the way Hadžihalilović strips male bodies of their autonomy. The women here are sirens with secret agendas and the film’s most gruesome moments work by forcing the anxieties of childbirth upon a gender that usually has the luxury of ignoring them. By the end of this ominous lullaby, it’s clear that the film isn’t a puzzle meant to be solved

Evrim

Evrim

4 out of 5 stars

Siz onu belki İstanbul Film Festivali’nden ödüllü ‘Innocence’ (2004) ile tanıyorsunuz belki de Gaspar Noé’nin eşi olarak biliyorsunuz. ‘Évolution’ı izledikten sonra ise Lucile Hadzihalilovic adını kolay kolay hafızalarınızdan çıkaramayacaksınız. ‘Évolution’ Fransa kıyılarındaki küçük bir adada geçen sarsıcı bir film. Söz konusu adadaki tüm evlerde çocuklarını tek başına yetiştiren kadınlar yaşamaktadır. Çocuklar gündüzleri mercan kayalıklarında yüzerek vakit geçirir, akşamlarıysa anneleri onları garip bir yemekle besler ve ‘ilaç’ adını verdikleri bir sıvıyı içmeleri için zorlar. Bir gün Nicolas (Max Brebant) adındaki meraklı bir çocuk ilaca direnir ve annesiyle (Julie- Marie Parmentier) yaşadığı evden sıvışır. Bu noktadan sonra olaylar garipleşmeye başlar. ‘Évolution’ karanlık ve gizemli bir dünya resmederken Nicolas’ın yolculuğu sırasında hissettiği ilkel korkuyu ve merak hissini izleyici de bir an olsun kaybetmiyor. Hikâye bir yandan tutarlı bir olay örgüsüyle ilerleyedursun, filmin ortaya koyduğu can alıcı soruların yanıtlarını aramak ise seyirciye düşüyor. Film boyunca Cronenberg’i hatırlatan bir dehşet duygusuyla ve kafanızdaki soru işaretleriyle baş başasınız. 

Arabian Nights: Volume 2 – The Desolate One

Arabian Nights: Volume 2 – The Desolate One

4 out of 5 stars

Early in Miguel Gomes’s bawdy, brilliant, inadvisably epic new project, there’s a scene in which the director appears on screen in a panic, desperately trying to escape from his crew. Given the scope of the Tabu filmmaker’s latest undertaking, it’s easy to understand why. Furious at the crippling austerity measures that the Portuguese government imposed on its people in the summer of 2013, Gomes embarked on an opus expansive enough to convey how belt-tightening had metastasized to every corner and community of the country. The result is Arabian Nights, a gargantuan 383-minute trilogy that borrows the form of its ancient namesake but not its stories, replacing them instead with ones that Gomes has invented. By turns surreal, giddy, erotic, didactic, righteous, exhausting, boundlessly creative and a thousand and one other things, this shape-shifting colossus feels as diverse as the people of Portugal themselves. Gorgeously shot on 35mm and Super 16, this broadly allegorical saga includes segments that range from the angry satire of “The Men with a Hard-on,” in which government and IMF representatives encounter a genie who cures them of the impotence, to less-obvious episodes like “The Owners of Dixie,” in which an adorable stray dog is passed between the various residents of a suburban high-rise. (The pooch's Dante-like journey coheres into a lucid symbol for the country as a whole.) Even the most inscrutable passages of Arabian Nights are sparked by Gomes’s rage, the basis for

Arabian Nights: Volume 3 – The Enchanted One

Arabian Nights: Volume 3 – The Enchanted One

4 out of 5 stars

Early in Miguel Gomes’s bawdy, brilliant, inadvisably epic new project, there’s a scene in which the director appears on screen in a panic, desperately trying to escape from his crew. Given the scope of the Tabu filmmaker’s latest undertaking, it’s easy to understand why. Furious at the crippling austerity measures that the Portuguese government imposed on its people in the summer of 2013, Gomes embarked on an opus expansive enough to convey how belt-tightening had metastasized to every corner and community of the country. The result is Arabian Nights, a gargantuan 383-minute trilogy that borrows the form of its ancient namesake but not its stories, replacing them instead with ones that Gomes has invented. By turns surreal, giddy, erotic, didactic, righteous, exhausting, boundlessly creative and a thousand and one other things, this shape-shifting colossus feels as diverse as the people of Portugal themselves.Gorgeously shot on 35mm and Super 16, this broadly allegorical saga includes segments that range from the angry satire of “The Men with a Hard-on,” in which government and IMF representatives encounter a genie who cures them of the impotence, to less-obvious episodes like “The Owners of Dixie,” in which an adorable stray dog is passed between the various residents of a suburban high-rise. (The pooch's Dante-like journey coheres into a lucid symbol for the country as a whole.) Even the most inscrutable passages of Arabian Nights are sparked by Gomes’s rage, the basis for

Welcome To Me

Welcome To Me

4 out of 5 stars

Alice Klieg hasn’t turned off her television in 11 years. The set’s exhausted images are constantly flickering around the walls of the musty one-bedroom apartment she shares with several hundred VHS tapes, each containing a single episode of ‘The Oprah Winfrey Show’. ‘Welcome to Me’ is about an unusual person – but this dark comedy makes it perfectly clear that the ‘me’ of the title is no mere eccentric. On the contrary, this is that rarest of birds: a genuinely funny movie about mental illness. Kristen Wiig plays Alice, who was diagnosed with manic-depressive disorder when she was 16, and she still has more prescriptions than friends. On the upside, she’s just won $86 million in the lottery. Frustrated when the local news cuts away when she’s collecting her oversize novelty cheque, Alice buys her own talk show on a cash-strapped infomercial channel. Going off her meds and blazing through her fortune, she creates ‘Welcome to Me’, in which she rides onto the stage in a swan boat and delivers segments that range from practical advice (‘matching colours to emotion’) to outsider art (vivid recreations of her most traumatic adolescent moments). But a smart script coupled with Wiig’s resolutely humane performance ensures that the laughter never comes at her expense.

One and Two

One and Two

3 out of 5 stars

Imagine if Terrence Malick made an ‘X-Men’ movie on a shoestring budget and you’ve got a decent sense of what director Andrew Droz Palermo has accomplished this contemplative supernatural teen drama. Set in idyllic middle-American farm country, the film introduces us to teenage brother and sister Zac (Timothée Chalamet) and Eva (Kiernan Shipka), who tend to the family’s chickens and wear potato-sack clothing like any normal nineteenth-century kids. But the plane they spy flying overhead suggests that they may not be in the nineteenth-century, and the envy with which they watch the aircraft move through the sky suggests that they’ve never been allowed to venture beyond the massive wall that rings their land like a stiff collar. We’re never told who built the barrier – all signs point to the kids’ violently domineering father (Grant Bowler) – but it soon becomes obvious why: Eva and Zac can teleport to any place they can see. The nature of their gift remains a mystery. Director Palermo, whose only previous feature, ‘Rich Hill’, was a sobering doc about American poverty, makes a smooth transition to fiction, and his affinity for naturalism prevents ‘One and Two’ from slipping into the territory of tired YA fantasy. Unfortunately, this allegory for the process by which kids start to think for themselves only hints at the turbulence of its characters, who are kept at too far a remove for us to feel their growing pains.

스티브 잡스

스티브 잡스

4 out of 5 stars

스티브 잡스는 엄청난 성공을 거둔 천재였으나 과대망상증 환자이기도 했다. 각본가 아론 소킨은 전작 "소셜 네트워크"에서보다 더욱 날카롭고 치열한 대본을 통해 뛰어난 천재성이 자신의 도덕성을 잠식하기 시작한 공학 몽상가의 이야기를 훌륭하게 그려낸다. 영화를 연출한 대니 보일 감독은 이 작품에서 자신의 존재감을 드러내지 않으려 노력하지만, 그게 그리 성공적이지는 않은 것 같다.   영화는 크게 세 부분으로 나뉜다. 각각의 막은 새 제품이 출시되기 이전을 배경으로 한다. 빈틈없이 잘 만들어진 첫 번째 부분은 1984년 첫 매킨토시(Macintosh)가 세상에 공개되기 30분 전의 이야기를 담았다. 마이클 패스벤더는 영화 초반 이 괴짜를 연기하기에는 지나치게 기분이 좋아 보이기는 하지만, 빠른 속도로 진행되는 독백을 거치며 점점 설득력 있는 인물이 된다. 영화의 두 번째 섹션은 1988년 스티브 잡스가 그의 실패작 넥스트(NeXT) 컴퓨터를 출시하던 때이며, 마지막 부분은 10년 여의 시간을 뛰어넘어 아이맥(iMac)을 처음 선보인 날로 향한다. 그리고 이때쯤 마이클 패스벤더는 스티브 잡스와 꼭 닮은 모습이 된다.    하지만 마이클 패스벤더의 기적적인 연기력으로도 대니 보일 감독을 구원해낼 수는 없었다. 어쩌면 그가 이런 식의 서사를 이끌어나가기에는 너무나 온화한 성격을 지녔기 때문인지도 모른다. 감상적이 되어가는 자신의 충동을 거의 두 시간 동안이나 억누르고 난 뒤, 대니 보일 감독은 마침내 과장된 감상주의로 일격을 날린 후 영화를 끝맺는다.

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Watch a trailer for the year's best Sundance movie

Watch a trailer for the year's best Sundance movie

We saw more than 50 movies at Sundance this year, but the one that topped our list as the best of the fest was just 16 minutes long. And frankly, it wasn't even close. "World of Tomorrow" is the seventh Don Hertzfeldt short to play at Sundance (his 2000 entry, "Rejected," would eventually go on to be nominated for an Oscar), his second to win the festival's Grand Jury Prize for its category, and the first to make us feel that the rest of our year at the movies might be all downhill from there.  RECOMMENDED: Read our full coverage of Sundance Film Festival A whirlwind 16-minute adventure through space, time, memory and the limitless potential of the “outernet,” "World of Tomorrow" is the indie animator's first all-digital short (although the brilliantly deranged couch gag that he made for the most recent season premiere of The Simpsons served as something of a dry run). Hertzfeldt's most colorful film follows in its maker's proud tradition of dropping stick figures into grand existential crises, the story for this one introducing a 4-year-old British girl named Emily (Winona Mae) who’s too small and innocent to realize what’s happening when an adult clone of herself (Julia Pott) invites her for a tragicomic tour of the future. Their journey across space and time is packed with adventures both devastating and devastatingly funny—the young Emily is voiced by Hertzfeldt's niece, who's stitched her performance together from the hilarious snippets of audio he recorded while she was

Watch trailers for two of 2015's most exciting indies

Watch trailers for two of 2015's most exciting indies

The year in cinema is just about over, and it may have ended with the industry ceding control of Hollywood to a group of North Korean hackers. It's a bad blow to the creative integrity of mainstream movies—one that serves to underscore just how valuable indie filmmaking will continue to be in the future. With that in mind, it's somewhat fortuitous that trailers for two of the most exciting art-house features of 2015 debuted online during the height of the madness sparked by The Interview, each of them making a good case against our initial instinct to hole up in a bunker with a bunch of old Blu-rays and let the medium run its course. The first is Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter, which premiered at Sundance in January and more than held its own against the likes of Boyhood and The Babadook. Conceived by brothers David and Nathan Zellner, and loosely based on a true-ish story, the mordantly funny dark comedy follows the intercontinental journey of a young woman (Pacific Rim star Rinko Kikuchi) who finds an old VHS copy of Fargo buried in a cave along the coast of Japan. Believing the Coen brothers' film to be a documentary—and the money that Steve Buscemi buries in the tundras of the American midwest to be real—Kumiko abandons her pet rabbit Bunzo and heads for the United States. It's clear that the film's pathologically determined heroine is a bit deranged, but she's just so damn endearing that you can't help but hope she finds a pot of gold at the end of her twisted rainbow. Dest

Three short films that fight against racist police brutality

Three short films that fight against racist police brutality

Since WWII (if not before), film has been recognized as a vital means of recording, shaping and disseminating images of atrocities and criminal injustices. But the explosion of digital technology has made the medium a peerlessly urgent weapon in the fight against systemic oppression. While the most primal examples of this usually take the form of amateur videos shot by civilian witnesses (perhaps best illustrated by the wealth of footage produced during the recent revolutions in Egypt and the Ukraine), professional filmmakers have begun to follow in those footsteps, abandoning their lethargic production schedules in order to reckon with the present moment. Video—or the lack thereof—has played a vitally implicit role in the shooting deaths of unarmed black men like Michael Brown and Eric Garner, and the subsequent lack of convictions for the white police officers who murdered them. And it has already begun to play an equally vital role in the collective response: From titans of black film to emerging new voices, the film community has been quick to produce a diverse array of galvanizing and cathartic work for a country in which a significant portion of the population still lives in fear of the people sworn to protect them. Below are three very different films by three very different filmmakers.  #BlackoutBlackFriday: The Time Has Come “#BlackoutBlackFriday: The Time Has Come” is a beautiful and haunted conceptual piece by An Oversimplification of Her Beauty director Terence Na

Ira Glass joins Bennett Miller for an IFC Center screening of The Cruise

Ira Glass joins Bennett Miller for an IFC Center screening of The Cruise

Foxcatcher director Bennett Miller has come a long way since making his feature filmmaking debut with the under-seen 1998 documentary The Cruise, but no matter how many Best Picture-nominated movies you make (and Foxcatcher is poised to be Miller's third in a row; you can read our review here), you can never really leave New York. This is where Miller was born, and his first film–which is wildly different from everything he's made since–is the kind of twisted love letter to Manhattan that you might expect from a guy who's made a career of looking under the skin of The American Dream. A loving and only partially demented portrait of a motormouthed NYC tour bus guide named Timmy "Speed" Levitch, The Cruise is a blisteringly enjoyable ride along with a personality who's as unique to his city as his city is unique to the world. Shooting in super high-contrast black and white, and keeping the camera locked on Levitch so as to see the city through his manic eyes, Miller's debut is a one-of-a-kind hyper-speed adventure through New York City as it may never be again (or, depending on how much stock you put in Levitch's stories, may never have been in the first place). Miller is currently on the campaign trail for Foxcatcher, and the IFC Center is making the most of it. Tomorrow night at 730pm, they'll be screening The Cruise on 35mm, and the film will be followed by a Q&A between Miller and Serial godfather Ira Glass. The event will be held as part of the series "Ira Glass Favorites

Where to see the Star Wars Episode VII trailer this weekend

Where to see the Star Wars Episode VII trailer this weekend

The day that Star Wars fans have been waiting for is…still more than a year away. But director J.J. Abrams will poke a big hole in his mystery box on Friday 28 when the 88-second teaser trailer for Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens debuts in theaters. While the trailers for most movies these days pop up on the Internet without much advance notice, Star Wars isn't most movies, and every dribble from its marketing campaign is likely to be seen as an event on par with the release of a blockbuster feature. So, in an admittedly nice throwback to a time when movie theaters were still allowed to be communal places of discovery, people will experience their first glimpse at The Force Awakens the same way they did The Phantom Menace back in 1998: by going to the multiplex, buying a ticket to whatever is playing, and leaving en masse after the previews. However, only 30 theaters in the country will be playing the trailer, so don't buy tickets to that 10am screening of Horrible Bosses 2 before double-checking that you're going to the right place. In fact, since the trailer will play before every movie at the chosen theaters, don't buy tickets to that 10am screening of Horrible Bosses 2 at all (our review explains why)—find the indiest indie you can and make a generous donation (and, if you're feeling really crazy, why not stick around and watch the movie? Here's a handy list of the best films now playing). In NYC, the trailer will screen before all features at Regal Union Square

Central Park Conservancy Film Festival announces their 2015 lineup

Central Park Conservancy Film Festival announces their 2015 lineup

There's no end to the variety of things you can do in Central Park during the summer, and the Central Park Conservancy Film Festival is back to make sure that cinephiles don't have to miss out on the fun. Once the sun sets and all the rollerbladers have disappeared to wherever rollerbladers go after dark, this annual August screening series—part of a broader campaign to reverse the decline of Manhattan's largest playground—transforms the park into the city's most inclusive film fest. This year's slate is all about celebrating the 35th anniversary of the Central Park Conservancy, and so all five of the movies on the docket are beloved classics from the magical time known as 1980. Check out the full lineup: Tuesday, Aug 25: Fame  Wednesday, Aug 26: The Blues Brothers Thursday, Aug 27: Airplane!  Friday, Aug 28: Raging Bull  Saturday, Aug 29: Superman II  All screenings are open captioned and completely free. Click here to RSVP. The fest will take place on the landscape between Sheep Meadow and the 72nd Street Cross Drive (Terrace Drive). The gates will open at 6:30pm and the movies will begin at 8pm, rain or shine. Click over to the Conservancy's site for more information.  

The Tribeca Film Festival will kick off with a history of SNL

The Tribeca Film Festival will kick off with a history of SNL

With every passing year, the Tribeca Film Festival becomes an increasingly unmissable fixture on the city's cinema calendar. The sprawling event brings hundreds of exciting (and sometimes not so exciting) new movies to the heart of downtown Manhattan. Founded by Robert De Niro and friends in the hopes of rejuvenating the area after 9/11, the festival has always been defined by its connection to the city, and its marquee events tend to reflect that. (Last year's opening night film, Nas: Time Is Illmatic, was a euphoric explosion of Queens pride.) The 2015 edition, which runs April 15–26, is clearly committed to continuing that tradition. Today, the fest announces that this year's opening-night film is Bao Nguyen's Live from New York!, a documentary that looks back at how Saturday Night Live filtered and shaped more than 40 years of American culture, pop or otherwise. Nguyen's film won't be the first feature to turn its cameras on Lorne Michaels's late-night institution (James Franco's Saturday Night, a fly-on-the-wall look at the making of a single episode, played at Tribeca in 2010), but its focus on the program's formative early years promises to make for a unique look at a beloved NYC export. Be sure to come back for the announcement of the festival's full slate in early March, and follow us (@TimeOutUSFilm) for a comprehensive guide to the fest as it takes shape. RECOMMENDED: Full coverage of the Tribeca Film Festival

10 things we learned at Tribeca's live chat between Stephen Colbert and George Lucas

10 things we learned at Tribeca's live chat between Stephen Colbert and George Lucas

Over the last few years, the Tribeca Talks series has become one of the most reliably exciting parts of the Tribeca Film Festival, as the programmers have an unusual flair for sparking memorable conversations between unexpected pairs. Yesterday, Star Wars obsessive Stephen Colbert got to live out a childhood dream by interviewing series mastermind George Lucas, and we were on hand to see the hour-long chat between the pithy TV host and the much less pithy architect of a galaxy far, far away. For those of you who couldn’t make it, here are ten highlights from the event. RECOMMENDED: Full coverage of the Tribeca Film Festival 1. It’s “okay” to be George Lucas Many of Colbert’s questions were geared towards investigating who George Lucas is, even if Lucas was more interested in talking more about the things that he’s done. Still, Colbert was able to wring a few telling moments out of his interviewee, such as when he asked the man across from him to describe what it’s like to be George Lucas. “It’s okay,” Lucas replied, without a hint of irony or sarcasm. And that was that. 2. George Lucas may not smell so great One of the few things that Lucas shared about himself is that he’s not really much for the idea of celebrity. When asked if he enjoys the Hollywood party scene, Lucas responded that he only owns one pair of Levi’s and one pair of sneakers. Lucas stopped short of saying that he was a recluse, and Colbert got him to confirm that he does not, in fact, keep his house lined wi

Where to see free outdoor screenings of classic scary movies this Halloween

Where to see free outdoor screenings of classic scary movies this Halloween

A spooky kind of magic descends over parks this time of year (even the parks that are already spooky), as the shadows become that much darker and all of the trees suddenly seem to be hiding something. So while it's true that outdoor screenings might be more of a summer thing, what better place could there be to watch a scary movie than under a full moon, surrounded by rustling leaves and dozens of strangers you can't really see? Adding to the small list of October's outdoor movie screenings (shout out to Habana Outpost!), the Department of Parks & Rec is getting into the Halloween spirit with the Monster Mash-ups Movie Series, which—over the course of the month—will turn just about every park in Brooklyn into a haven for outdoor horror. The lineup skews more towards morbid comedy than outright terror (the scariest thing about seeing some of these movies might be the temperature), but each of these films is a great time, particularly if you snag a good spot, bring a whole mess of blankets, and maybe sneak in something you're not supposed to. All of the screenings are free and begin shortly after 6pm. Check out the series schedule below, and be sure to visit the Department of Parks & Rec's site for more information. - Shaun of the Dead at West Lawn in Sunset Park, Brooklyn (October 9th) - Buffy the Vampire Slayer at South Lawn in Dyker Beach Park, Brooklyn (October 10th) - Young Frankenstein at Brooklyn War Memorial in Cadman Plaza Park, Brooklyn (October 16th) - The Addams Fam

Kevin!! Home Alone is returning to theaters for two nights only

Kevin!! Home Alone is returning to theaters for two nights only

Want to feel old? Home Alone, Christopher Columbus's classic (and surprisingly violent) 1990 comedy about a pre-teen kid whose family accidentally leaves him home alone (!!!) during Christmas vacation, is about to turn twenty-five. Kevin McCallister, once a cherubic Rube Goldberg wannabe with the imagination required to transform his parents' house into a giant torture chamber for the "Wet Bandits" who were trying to rob it, would now be thirty-three years old and living in a booby-trapped loft somewhere in Bushwick. But we've got some good news for anyone who thinks that Macaulay Culkin is still the greatest thing that someone named Christopher Columbus ever discovered. In honor to commemorate this milestone in American culture, Fathom Events is bringing Home Alone back to theaters for two nights only. On November 8 and November 11, the AMC Empire 25 and the Union Square Regal 14 will be your go-to destinations to watch Daniel Stern and Joe Pesci get hilariously outwitted by a small child with an appetite for destruction. Screenings at both theaters will be at 4:30 and 7:30pm, and tickets will cost $12.50. Be sure to hit up Fathom Events for more information.  

MoMA sets a marathon screening of the Back to the Future trilogy

MoMA sets a marathon screening of the Back to the Future trilogy

The Internet is a wild and unpredictable place, but throughout all of its shifts and evolutions, one thing has remained perfectly clear: Every social network on Earth is going to lose its mind when we reach the date on which Marty McFly traveled to the future in Back to the Future II. After a mind-numbing series of Photoshopped false starts, the actual date (October 21, 2015) is finally upon us, and the Museum of Modern Art literally can't wait to celebrate: Taking advantage of the fact that series mastermind Robert Zemeckis is in town to premiere The Walk at this year's New York Film Festival (check out all of our NYFF coverage here), MoMA has programmed a comprehensive retrospective of the director's work beginning Tuesday 29, screening everything he's made since 1972's The Lift. The series' main event, however, will undoubtedly be on Saturday October 3, when all three Back to the Future films will play back-to-back-to-back. Starting at 2pm and wrapping up just before 10pm, audiences will get to enjoy the complete quantum misadventures of McFly and Doc Brown—from Marty's 1955 mishaps at the Enchantment Under the Sea dance to Doc Brown getting it on with schoolteacher Clara Clayton in 1895 (and everything in between). Where we're going, we don't need to move for eight hours. A special presale ticket package for the trilogy is available online through October 3. The ticket package ($25 general public, free for members) includes one ticket to the October 3 screenings of Back t

The eight best outdoor movie screenings left this summer

The eight best outdoor movie screenings left this summer

The summer might be almost over (sorry to remind you), but there's no rule that you can't watch movies outside after Labor Day. The last few years have seen NYC transform into one of the best cities on Earth for outdoor cinema, and a bunch of awesome new events—like Rooftop Film Club, which finally brought London's snazziest sunset screening series to the States—helped take things to a new level in 2015. And the fun is going to rage on until the calendar tells us it isn't summer anymore. (The folks at Habana Outpost aren't even going to stop then.) The Central Park Conservancy Film Festival kicks off today, while Rooftop Film Club has saved some of the best for last, including a late September screening of Man on Wire hosted by Time Out and timed to the New York Film Festival premiere of The Walk, the new Robert Zemeckis movie based on James Marsh's brilliant doc. Check out our full schedule of outdoor movie screenings, and be sure to head over to our Rooftop Film Club tickets page when you know what you want to see (since those screenings aren't free).  FameSheep Meadow and the 72nd Street Cross Drive (Terrace Drive), Central Park, August 25 6:30pm Pan's LabyrinthRooftop Film Club, August 26, 8pm Die HardSyFy Movies with a View, Brooklyn Bridge Park, 6pm Airplane!Sheep Meadow and the 72nd Street Cross Drive (Terrace Drive), Central Park, August 27, 6:30pm AmyRooftop Film Club, September 6, 8pm The GooniesHabana Outpost, September 6, 8pm ManhattanRooftop Film Club, September