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Natasha Wynarczyk

Natasha Wynarczyk

Articles (5)

The 17 best things to do in Tenerife

The 17 best things to do in Tenerife

It’s all too easy to lump Tenerife – the largest of Spain’s seven Canary Islands – in with all the other classic package holiday destinations. But there’s much more to this isle than all-inclusive hotels, theme parks and Irish bars. Tenerife is full of fascinating and quirky stuff to see and do – much of which you can’t do anywhere else. From delicious wine and tapas that rival anything you'll find on the Spanish mainland to stunning botanical gardens, phenomenal hiking trails and mesmerising art, Tenerife has something for every discerning traveller. And you can drive across the entire thing in well under three-and-a-half hours! Not only is there loads of things to see on Tenerife and not only is it all very, very accessible, but it’s also on an island just off the coast of Africa – meaning that it’s usually warm and sunny year-round. Here’s where to to get started! RECOMMENDED: 🛏 The 12 best hotels in Tenerife

The unlikely ghost stories of London tourist traps

The unlikely ghost stories of London tourist traps

With thousands of years of history, it's little wonder that London is known for being one of the most haunted cities in the world. We spoke to four people who work at some of the capital's spookiest locations about the dead Londoners who are refusing to leave their old homes and workplaces behind...

The 13 best things to do in Reykjavik

The 13 best things to do in Reykjavik

With just over 120,000 inhabitants, Iceland's coastal capital might seem small—but it actually had a big character, as proven by the very best things to do in Reykjavik. There's no shortage of fun sights and attractions, from trying out unusual national dishes such as puffin and boiled sheep's heads at some of the city's traditional restaurants to chilling out in a relaxing natural spring hotel or gaping at the natural wonders just a short drive from the vibrant city. The rugged, volcanic landscape around Reykjavik has long been a source of inspiration to many musicians and artists, including The XX, who recorded songs and planned a music festival there, and, of course Björk. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere. Find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world.

See inside London's secretive golden syrup factory

See inside London's secretive golden syrup factory

Lyle’s golden syrup recipe is top secret. It’s so top secret, in fact, that in order to even get access to the factory I’ve spent months negotiating and wangling my way in. It’s finally paid off – an employee of ‘Big Syrup’ has finally agreed to let me inside Plaistow Wharf, which has been making the delicious amber goo since 1885. Nestled behind West Silvertown DLR station, the huge grey factory is easily identifiable as syrup central thanks to the giant Lyle’s can attached to the side of the building – and the fact that as you walk closer you can smell the unmistakable sickly-sweet scent of burnt sugar in the air. At the entrance, there’s a stone carving of the slightly creepy Lyle’s golden syrup logo – a dead lion surrounded by bees with the legend ‘From the strong came forth sweetness’. The logo is something that would probably never get past advertising bods today, but golden syrup’s design has been unchanged since its inception, and the product holds a Guinness World Record for the world’s oldest branding. Before I can get inside the factory and see how the secretive syrup is made, I visit another location: Tate & Lyle’s sugar refinery, at the other end of what was once called ‘the sugar mile’. Local affairs manager Chris Abell meets me at the front of the refinery, which is tucked away behind a massive wall near City Airport. We change into hard hats and yellow tabards, and I remove all my jewellery, as he tells me that the company’s tin line churns out a staggering

The 13 best things to do in Warsaw

The 13 best things to do in Warsaw

Poland’s sprawling capital has a chequered history, including brutal Medieval warfare and occupation during World War II—and you can explore all that and more when tackling each one of the best things to do in Warsaw. This is reflected in the city's architecture, from Gothic churches to tall Soviet skyscrapers. Cooler than the more touristy Krakow, Warsaw has undergone a major foodie revival in recent years and has also developed a thriving art scene in the warehouses littered throughout the city. Budget airlines offer direct flights here for as little as £35 return—and, as it's Eastern Europe, you can expect to actually come home with leftover spending money despite living like a king while in town. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere. Find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world.

News (1)

This photographer has spent almost ten years photographing the furries of London

This photographer has spent almost ten years photographing the furries of London

In 2008 photographer Tom Broadbent was sent out on an unusual magazine assignment. He was invited to attend and snap some pictures at the Rather Brilliant Weekend, a London convention for the ’furry’ community - a subculture who collect items and media relating to anthropomorphic characters, and often dress up as them too, whether it be wearing ’regular human clothes’ with an animal head, or a full suit. ’As I came out of the cab and walked into the hotel lobby where the convention was being held, a six-foot wolf walked across my path and I thought it was pretty amazing,’ he recalls. After taking pawtraits (sorry) of the different furries at the convention, Broadbent came up with the idea of a project where he photographed them at home in their costumes. The result is almost ten years’ worth of work, titled ’At Home with the Furries.’   Smirnoff, a husky wolf plays piano in Southgate, North London     Now Broadbent has launched a Kickstarter campaign to self-publish a book of around 30 portraits of furries in various domestic scenes. From a border collie sat in his bedroom strumming the guitar, to a Welsh dragon chopping leeks in his kitchen and a fox and a wolf playing poker, his pawsome work makes the mundane look extraordinary. It took Broadbent around a year of going to furry meetups in London - which can sometimes attract as many as 200 people - and building up trust with members of the community before he began photographing them in their houses. ‘Now, many of them ha

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