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The best new movie releases in November

Here are the best new movie releases in November

1

Spectre

James Bond is back! For the twenty-fourth time (not counting the unofficial ones!). This latest adventure picks up where ‘Skyfall’ left off, with M still dead and Bond still wrestling with encroaching middle age and rampaging anger-management issues. Expect angst and action in roughly equal measure as he takes on his old nemeses, shadowy international terror organisation SPECTRE. ‘Skyfall’ fans (and there are a lot of you) will be pleased to see the old team reuniting, including director Sam Mendes, writer John Logan and star Daniel Craig. We expect to see Ben Whishaw back as Q and Ralph Fiennes as slippery MI6 operative Gareth Mallory, who, for better or worse, has now stepped into M’s sensible heels.

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2

The Priests

The Priests is a story about two priests who are chasing after something called “the 12 figures,” which are hiding in a girl whom there are tying to rescue. Both Kim Yoon-seok and Kang Dongwon starred in Jeon Woochi: The Taoist Wizard (2009), and here they team up again as a priest and a deacon, who is fluent in German, Latin and Chinese. Priest Kim (Kim Yoon-seok) and deacon Choi (Kang Dong-won) are given a single day to exorcise an evil spirit living in a girl. This mystery thriller is grabbing people’s attention thanks to the two leading actors. It’s also the first feature length movie by director Jang Jae-hyun, who won the Best Director Award at the 15th Jeonju International Film Festival for his short film 12th Assistant Deacon (2014).

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3

Taxi

By shutting director Jafar Panahi down, the Iranian government has only made him more powerful than it could have possibly imagined. Banned from making movies and baselessly convicted of crimes against national security, the Offside filmmaker has still managed to export three masterpieces in the five years since his sentencing. Although Taxi has neither the raw anger of This Is Not a Film (2011) nor it’s incredible origin story—the footage was loaded onto a USB drive and then smuggled out of Iran in a cake—this spry, sharp and relentlessly clever middle finger to censorship is Panahi’s boldest act of defiance to date. Taxi finds Panahi behind the wheel of a cab in downtown Tehran. Shot to resemble a documentary (but far too pointed and plot-driven to be mistaken for one), Taxi slowly transforms the interior of Panahi’s car into a stage for crimes, confessions, deathbed declarations and even a goldfishrelated tragedy.

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