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Spaces, places and freebies for millennials

Work it, don’t twerk it!

The sky's the limit, but it ain't always easy getting there. Here are spaces, places and freebies to help. 

Micimpact Square

Micimpact Square is a company that aims to “change the world” through its open-minded venue and cultural events. They have three different venues throughout Seoul and each of them has a slightly different purpose. While their website (micimpact.com) is in Korean only, many of their events are accessible to non-Korean speakers and their spaces are foreigner-friendly.

Micimpact Square_Jongno

At their Jongno location, you’ll find small meeting rooms as well as a café, salon, lounge and a rooftop garden. You can rent out these spaces along with projectors, amps, speakers and microphones to use during your event. An event called Micimpact happens once a week where you can hear lectures from professors, CEOs and show hosts all for the price of one cup of coffee.

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Micimpact Square_Yeoksam

If you’re like a lot of millennials and can’t afford to sign a lease on a place quite yet, try this co-working space in the ritzy Gangnam district. You can study or brainstorm in the main hall or rent the Salon or Lab for a meeting. Membership’s pretty cheap and it’s a good place to network.

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Micimpact Square_Sinchon

At this space in Sinchon, independent producers of accessories, stationary, figures, clothes and bags are allowed to sell their products. Micimpacts provides opportunities, such as marketing, and does their best to help artists achieve their dreams. Both the pub on the 5th floor and rooftop are available to rent out to host events. The Youth Flea Market also takes place here.

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Seoul Youth Zone

In 2013, the Seoul city government started a program that was aimed at helping the city’s youth. The program plans to have five different youth-focused community centers in Seoul by 2018. Two locations have opened so far. 

Seoul Youth Zone: Daebang-dong

In 2013, the Seoul city government started a program that was aimed at helping the city’s youth. The program plans to have five different youth-focused community centers in Seoul by 2018. The Zero Gravity Zone G-Valley was designed, not just as a space for unemployed youth, but also for young people who want to reflect on their current jobs and think about how to change the systems that they might be dissatisfied with. One of the programs they host is a self-development program where you can learn about and study subjects you believe could be your true passion. They hold a variety of workshops, movie screenings and board game nights. 

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Seoul Youth Zone: Zero Gravity Zone G-Valley

The Zero Gravity Zone G-Valley was designed, not just as a space for unemployed youth, but also for young people who want to reflect on their current jobs and think about how to change the systems that they might be dissatisfied with. One of the programs they host is a self-development program where you can learn about and study subjects you believe could be your true passion. They hold a variety of workshops, movie screenings and board game nights. 

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Hive Arena

A co-working space often frequented by software engineers, art directors and the CEOs of start-ups, Hive Arena not only provides a space to help you grow your idea but is also a supportive community as well. Perhaps the most English-friendly of co-working spaces in Seoul, you’ll find digital natives from Russia, the U.S., Canada, Sweden, Singapore, England and France. 

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TIP

Looking for a co-working space near you? Try sharedesk.net. It’s kind of like Airbnb, but more for work than play. 

Freebies

Free Korean classes

Struggling to learn Korean? Worried about the costs? Here are some free (or almost free) classes that'll have you no-excuses.

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By: Hahna Yoon

Beeline for that visa

Korea Immigration and Integration Program (KIIP)

Also known as the “social integration program,” KIIP consists of two parts. While originally designed to help the spouses of those married to Koreans, many types of foreigners, including students, foreign workers and refugees, are eligible for this program. The first part involves Korean language training (415 hours) and the second part involves understanding Korean society training (50 hours). Those who successfully finish all of the training receive a certificate at the end and earn points towards getting their Korean citizenship. There are approximately 20 locations nationwide at which you can take classes and the competition to get into them is quite intense. However, the program comes highly recommended from previous students. Those interested in registering for the exam may find the blog keytokorean.com to be very helpful. (socinet.go.kr).

Business Start-Up School

Seoul is eager to gear up its image as a global city and part of that includes helping foreigners start businesses in Korea. To help you get your start, you can look to the Global Business Center, which is located in Yeouido and Kangnam. Every few months, they open a start-up school that teaches foreigners how to launch an enterprise of their own in Seoul. The classes are free and teach you everything from writing a business plan, to FDI procedures, how to do your taxes, etc. Availability is limited to 25 people per class and the best part is that at the end of the course, 25 points will go towards an OASIS VISA (start-up visa) and they’ll also provide you with consultation after the classes are over. Check global.seoul.go.kr/yeouido/biz.do for the next available session. 

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