Worldwide icon-chevron-right The latest Time Out features

The latest Time Out features

Keep your finger on the pulse of the best things to do across the world with our latest features and articles

Time Out and Instagram celebrate small businesses
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Time Out and Instagram celebrate small businesses

On July 9 and 10 we’re showcasing amazing small businesses in New York and London, and raising money to support affected workers

Paris has transformed into one giant café terrace
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Paris has transformed into one giant café terrace

After four months of lockdown, café culture is back in a big way in Paris. As of June 2, the French capital’s bars and restaurants have been allowed to reopen their outdoor space. And thanks to the relaxation of city rules – set to last until at least September – many are now spilling out on to the surrounding pavements and streets. All over town, parking spaces are now home to makeshift raw-wood shelters. Some bars have cobbled together ingenious structures out of old delivery pallets, like Chez Val in the 18th. Others have blown budgets on ambitious new terraces that could last for years, like Chez Michel in the 10th. The motto of Paris is ‘Fluctuat nec mergitur’: ‘She is rocked by the waves, but does not sink’. So, to the sound of clinking glasses, we headed out to meet some Parisians enjoying a night on the town last Friday, in a city changed but far from beaten. First stop: the 19th arrondissement’s Quai de la Loire, thronging with drinkers like in any normal summer. ‘I come here at least once a week,’ says Marion, an illustrator, standing outside a socially-distanced Bar Ourcq. ‘I gave up alcohol about a year ago, but their soft drink menu is amazing. The ginger juice is, like, €3, and I think it might be the city’s best?’ Further along the water, we say hello to Paul, a waiter at Les Bancs Publics, overlooking the Canal de l’Ourcq. ‘As of June 2 we’ve now got two terraces, with the road in the middle,’ he says. ‘As a waiter, when you’re always doing a million things

Time Out is now Time In
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Time Out is now Time In

Hi everyone, We’ve temporarily changed our logo to Time In. We’re still Time Out – singing about the best of the city, fearlessly braving fringe drag and extreme art, tirelessly covering gigs and clubs and shows and other key cultural happenings. It’s just that we realise that right now, in many of our 327 cities, a lot of people aren’t going out. We, Time Out, will keep you updated about what’s going on. And our journalists, photographers and videographers will carry on showing you the best of the city, whether you’re out and about or stuck at home. To the venues and the creators which we champion and recommend: we want you to know we’re here for you. We love you, because you make our cities and our street life special and unique. We know this is a tough time to be running a restaurant or bar, to be putting on shows and finding an audience. We’ll be here to celebrate and champion you, even if you’re temporarily closed or empty. Because when our cities bounce back – as they always do – we’re going to need that craft beer/weird art exhibition/drag brunch more than ever. Be safe. Love your city. See you in the queue. Caroline McGinnEditor-in-ChiefTime Out

How to support Black Lives Matter, wherever you are
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How to support Black Lives Matter, wherever you are

On May 25, a black man named George Floyd was killed in the US city of Minneapolis. Footage showed police officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on his neck for almost nine minutes, while Floyd repeated ‘I can’t breathe’. Chauvin has since been charged with murder for Floyd’s death. No charges have yet been filed against three other police officers present at Floyd’s killing. Floyd’s violent death at the hands of the police triggered protests, first in Minneapolis and then in more than 200 American cities – with solidarity demonstrations taking place across the world. The protests have brought Black Lives Matter, a decentralised movement founded in 2013 in response to the killing of of Trayvon Martin and other black Americans, back to prominence. Now people of all races, living in dozens of countries, are looking for ways to help. Whether it’s by donating money, attending protests, educating yourself or amplifying the voices of black people, there are many ways to support the global struggle against racism. Below, you’ll find just a few. This isn’t intended to be a comprehensive list, and we’ll continue to add to it as events evolve. Time Out (currently Time In) believes that equality and justice should be keystones of life and progress in the cities we cover. We express solidarity with everyone fighting injustice across the world, and we’ll continue to document the protests and to suggest how our cities can get involved and show support. Respect and peace to those taking a stand.

Most popular Time Out features

Explore the world’s greatest cities

Ranked: the world’s coolest neighbourhoods
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Ranked: the world’s coolest neighbourhoods

Savvy travellers want to live like locals, and that means looking beyond the sights and finding the coolest neighbourhoods to stay, eat, drink and hang out in. But what gives an area that indefinable cool factor?

The best cities in the world to live in and explore
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The best cities in the world to live in and explore

What’s the best city in the world? It’s a hotly contested title – but we think we’ve come up with the answer.

The best places across the globe to celebrate Pride
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The best places across the globe to celebrate Pride

If you’re a Pride lover, consider this your bucket list: 12 of the world's biggest and buzziest Pride parties.

The Time Out City Life Index 2018
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The Time Out City Life Index 2018

What’s life like in the city today? And which are the best cities for living life to the full?