A suspension bridge over a green valley with Mt Fuji in the background
Photo: Mishima Skywalk

Catch 13,000 hydrangeas in bloom around Japan’s longest suspension footbridge

The Hydrangea Festival at Mishima Skywalk in Shizuoka prefecture also features views of Mt Fuji

Tabea Greuner
Written by
Dina Kartit
Contributor
Tabea Greuner
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Aside from having the longest suspension footbridge in Japan – about 400m – Mishima Skywalk in Shizuoka prefecture is also known for hosting one of the biggest hydrangea festivals near Tokyo, attracting visitors of all ages for the huge number of blue hydrangeas blooming in summer.

Mishima Skywalk Natsuzora hydrangeas
Photo: Mishima SkywalkNatsuzora hydrangeas

This year, the Hydrangea Festival will feature about 13,000 hydrangeas across 205 varieties, including Natsuzora (Summer Sky), Skywalk and Hao, the venue’s three original hydrangea species.

Mishima Skywalk
Photo: Mishima Skywalk

Photo spots will be set up along the 2km promenade on the north side of the bridge. They offer lovely scenery with the hydrangeas, Suruga Bay and even Mt Fuji.

Mishima Skywalk
Photo: Mishima Skywalk

For something refreshing after your walk, go to Mishima Skywalk’s Picnic Café for the hydrangea-inspired sundae (¥500). The cup of vanilla ice cream is topped with a crispy waffle and colourful kohakuto candy-jelly.

 Mishima Skywalk
Photo: Mishima Skywalk

There’s also a hydrangea-themed pancake (¥1,100) with fresh fruit and hibiscus-flavoured whipped cream. The dessert is available at the Forest Kitchen next to the parking area, so you won’t need an entry ticket to the suspension bridge area to enjoy this treat.

 Mishima Skywalk
Photo: Mishima Skywalk

At the Skywalk Café next door, you can get this summery peach and grape-flavoured drink topped with soft serve ice cream (¥500).

All the aforementioned hydrangea sweets are available from June 11 until July 15.

Mishima Skywalk Hao hydrangeas
Photo: Mishima SkywalkHao hydrangeas

The Hydrangea Festival at Mishima Skywalk runs from June 11 until July 15. If you happen to come on a rainy day, you’ll get a free raincoat at the entrance.

Admission is ¥1,100 for adults, ¥500 for junior high and high school students, and ¥200 for primary school students.

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