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Dina Kartit

Dina Kartit

Articles (7)

4 best mochi cafés in Tokyo

4 best mochi cafés in Tokyo

You don’t have to have a sweet tooth to find joy in mochi (sticky rice cakes). A traditional Japanese delicacy, mochi can be sweet or savoury and are especially popular on special occasions such as New Year. They come in a variety of shapes and textures, from light and refreshing, like mochi ice cream and jelly-like warabimochi, to thick and chewy, like daifuku mochi filled with red beans and grilled shiratama.Whatever you’re craving, we've found four cafés and sweet shops in Tokyo where you can enjoy mochi in its many variations, along with a cup of tea. RECOMMENDED: Treat yourself with the best afternoon tea in Tokyo

11 best places to see hydrangeas in and around Tokyo

11 best places to see hydrangeas in and around Tokyo

Hydrangeas, also known as ajisai in Japanese, are commonly associated with the onset of the rainy season – just like cherry blossoms are with spring. Their vivid blue, purple, pink, or even snow-white colours make them instantly identifiable and enliven those dreary, wet days. A popular legend even says that finding a snail on a hydrangea is a sign of good fortune.  Every year, you can spot these charming flowers throughout Tokyo, with bushes blooming in some of the city's best parks, such as Ueno Park, shrines like Hakusan Shrine and even as far out as Fuchu. Grab your umbrella and head to these spots to see the most beautiful hydrangeas in the capital. RECOMMENDED: Not into flowers? Explore Tokyo's coolest streets instead

東京、紫陽花の名所10選

東京、紫陽花の名所10選

タイムアウト東京 > Things To Do >東京、紫陽花の名所10選 梅雨といえばアジサイ(紫陽花)。青、紫、ピンク、雪のような白と、その豊かな色彩は憂鬱な雨の日でも華やいだ気分にさせてくれる。 ここでは、上野や隅田公園、府中など東京を中心にアジサイ観賞が楽しめるスポットを紹介する。傘を持って、梅雨を彩る美しい景色を愛でる旅に出かけよう。 原文はこちら 関連記事 『東京、ホタルの名所2022』

8 best maritozzo cream buns in Tokyo

8 best maritozzo cream buns in Tokyo

A maritozzo is a soft brioche bun filled with whipped cream and – if you can believe it – a classic Roman breakfast. In Italy, the enthusiasm for these delicious baked goods is such that fans have even organised citywide ‘Maritozzo Day’ festivals. Maritozzi have really taken off in Japan recently, with a myriad of shops and cafés serving the traditional cream buns, or even putting their own spin on the formula. If you’re looking for satisfying maritozzo, we’ve got eight stores and cafés in Tokyo offering this mouth-watering treat, in all different shapes, sizes and flavours. Note: these cafés and shops might close early depending on the current Covid-19 measures. Please check with the individual outlets for the latest business hours.  RECOMMENDED: The best patisseries and dessert cafés in Tokyo

8 new Korean restaurants and shops in Shin-Okubo

8 new Korean restaurants and shops in Shin-Okubo

Better known as Koreatown, Shin-Okubo is a paradise for fans of Korean pop culture, cosmetics and cuisine. The neighbourhood is full of gourmet restaurants, Instagrammable cafés, K-drama themed cafés, and cosmetics stores with the latest products straight from South Korea.  Here are some new Shin-Okubo spots to grab a snack, do some shopping and make you feel like you’re in the heart of Seoul. Note: these venues might close early depending on the current Covid-19 measures. Please check with the individual outlets for their latest business hours.  RECOMMENDED: Get fresh kicks at the best sneaker shops in Tokyo

Unlock the Real Japan: fourth issue out now

Unlock the Real Japan: fourth issue out now

Produced in collaboration with Time Out Tokyo, the fourth issue of Nikkei Asia's special magazine ‘Unlock the Real Japan’ is out now. Photo: Unlock the Real Japan Inspired by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), this issue focuses on some of the people at the forefront of Japan's efforts to reach those goals, from the history of Japan’s finance and education pioneer Eiichi Shibusawa to the futuristic vision of young digital artist and computer scientist Yoichi Ochiai. Photo: Unlock the Real Japan There are exclusive interviews with Shozo Kudo – former Director of the Committee on Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism – and senior managing officer of the Iwatani Corporation Hiroshi Fukushima, who both discuss the benefits of hydrogen and how this zero-carbon fuel can help power Japan’s future. Could comedy play a role in improving education as part of the SDGs? Takayuki Oinuma, president of Laugh and Peace Mother, tells us more about how laughter and technology help children develop abilities to assert themselves in the workplace. Akiko Okada and Hirotaka Tanaka talk about how new technology in the global food industry can lead to better production and consumption. On gender equality, activist Fumino Sugiyama calls on Japanese legislators to include more women in politics and to enact legislation to protect and support the LGBTQ+ community. Photo: Unlock the Real Japan As the Olympic and Paralympic Games are starting this month – about 57 years

5 Olympic sports to try in Tokyo

5 Olympic sports to try in Tokyo

The Olympics and Paralympics are the biggest sporting events in the world. Once every four years, seeing athletes compete on the world stage never fails to reignite our interest in sport and fitness. As Tokyo gears up to host the Games this summer, it’s time to get into the sporting spirit. Whether you're looking for new ways to stay fit or just a hobby, here are five fun Olympic sports you can easily partake in. RECOMMENDED: 5 Olympic venues you should visit in Tokyo

Listings and reviews (17)

Funabashiya Koyomi

Funabashiya Koyomi

Kameido-based traditional confectioner Funabashiya marked its 200th anniversary by opening this shop and café in Hiroo in 2005. The ground floor shop sells Funabashiya staples such as anmitsu (jellied red beans and fruit topped with sweet syrup), custard puddings and the signature kuzu-mochi for takeaway. The store makes this light Japanese dessert with wheat starch dissolved in sweetened water, and left to ferment for about 450 days. It might sound strange for a sweet treat, but trust us: once you’ve sampled this refreshing dessert, you’ll be hooked. Head upstairs and you'll find an elegantly appointed café space that's always quietly humming over lunch time. Here you can enjoy desserts including green tea chiffon cake and kakigori shaved ice, as well as some surprisingly wholesome lunch sets incorporating five-grain rice, fish and seasonal vegetables.

Oiwake Dango Honpo Shinjuku

Oiwake Dango Honpo Shinjuku

Oiwake Dango Honpo Café in Shinjuku is well known for its incredibly large variety of dango rice dumplings. Dango is served on a stick (three dumplings per stick) and can be ordered individually or as part of a set, which includes two sticks (from ¥583) with the sauce or topping of your choice.The café’s most popular options are mitarashi (sweet and spicy sauce; ¥183 per stick), one koshian (thick bean paste from Hokkaido; ¥183 per stick) and anmitsu (agar and brown sugar syrup from Okinawa; ¥432 per stick).  The store also has savoury options including sour plum and seaweed (¥291) or shichimi seaweed (¥194) dango. Make sure to check out the shop regularly as new limited-time flavours are often added to the menu. You can eat-in or order for takeout.Oiwake Dango Honpo also serves massive kakigori in summer and other handmade Japanese traditional sweets such as shiruko with grilled rice cakes (¥1,001), daifuku mochi (from ¥194) and anmitsu (¥891). 

Kyoto Saryo Suisen Shinjuku

Kyoto Saryo Suisen Shinjuku

Originally from Kyoto, this matcha café offers sticky Uji matcha warabimochi (bracken starch jelly) and is certain to satisfy both green tea and mochi lovers. Saryo Suisen’s warabimochi are served hot or cold and you can choose a stronger level of matcha flavour for more bitterness. It comes in a set with a pot of tea (gyokuro hojicha or sencha), shiratama (sweet white rice dumpling), red bean paste, kinako powder and kuromitsu (brown sugar syrup). The classic warabimochi set costs ¥1,180 (or ¥1,380 for a stronger matcha flavour). Other options include a bitter matcha soft cream and warabimochi covered in kinako (roasted soybean powder; ¥1,080), or strong matcha warabimochi in zenzai (sweet red bean soup; ¥990).  Apart from warabimochi, Saryo Suisen has many other dishes made with Kyoto tea, such as Japan-inspired parfaits (from ¥980), a selection of matcha cakes like cheesecakes (¥550), mont blanc (¥580) and mille crêpes (¥580), and Kyoto obanzai (traditional Kyoto savoury cuisine). You can accompany your meal with matcha beer (¥880) or an exclusive 3D matcha latte (¥780) with the design of your choice. 

Asukayama Park

Asukayama Park

This wooded hilltop park was once the estate of Eiichi Shibusawa (1840-1931), president of Japan’s first modern bank. Former US President Ulysses Grant was treated to a ju-jitsu demonstration here in 1879 while staying as Shibusawa’s guest. The towering mansion is long gone, but a few outbuildings remain. The park’s main attractions are the ‘Asukayama Three Museums’, which stand in a row at the park’s eastern edge. The Paper Museum (www.papermuseum.jp) displays items related to paper art, papermaking technology and the history of paper, and sometimes holds participatory workshops. The Kita City Asukayama Museum (3916 1133) focuses on local archaeological finds, including a dugout canoe from the Jomon period, Japan’s Stone Age. English signage is minimal, but the displays are largely self-explanatory. The Shibusawa Memorial Museum (3910 0005, www.shibusawa.or.jp) praises the achievements of Eiichi Shibusawa. Most of the exhibits are old documents, some in English – including a signed letter from Thomas Edison.

Tokyo Street Photography Group Exhibition 2021 Summer

Tokyo Street Photography Group Exhibition 2021 Summer

Whether you love photography or Tokyo’s sprawling cityscape, you should make a beeline for this exhibition in Koenji. For the first time, three street photography collectives – VoidTokyo, Frame Tokyo and Tokyo-SPC – are coming together for a group exhibition from July 20 to 25. Tokyo Street Photography Group Exhibition 2021 Summer is divided into three distinct exhibitions held across two adjacent galleries: VoidTokyo is taking over Clouds Gallery + Coffee while Frame and Tokyo-SPC are sharing the space at Blank.  Established in 2017, the collective VoidTokyo is dedicated to depicting the city’s ever-changing landscape. It also publishes a namesake photography zine that’s highly regarded in Japan as well as overseas. For this exhibition, seven members of the collective and seven guest photographers, including Ash Shinya Kawaoto, Joel Pulliam and Agis (who shot the photo in the event poster), have contributed photographs of Tokyo taken amid the coronavirus pandemic. Frame Tokyo, on the other hand, comprises seven street photographers who aim to change people's perceptions of Tokyo through their varied and compelling photography works. In November last year, the group released a series of photo books called 'Tokyo Guide’, which features a selection of Tokyo’s best photo spots. For this exhibition however, Frame Tokyo is putting out works that revolve around the theme of noise. These prints, taken by Shunsuke Matsunaga, Takeshi Ishikawa and Yume Katsumi, just to name a few, port

Parkers Shinjuku

Parkers Shinjuku

The bouldering gym at the new Parkers Shinjuku sports centre has walls catering to climbers of varying levels of experience. The gym rents out shoes and chalk so you need only arrive in comfortable clothes to get to grips with the climbing area. If you’re looking to do more besides climbing, Parkers Shinjuku also offers a spacious yoga studio with indoor and outdoor classes; the latter are held on the terrace overlooking the lush green grounds of Shinjuku Central Park. Prefer to take it outside? Sign up for guided sessions in jogging, Nordic walking and slacklining (walking on a tightrope suspended just off the ground).

Trampoland Tokyo Bayside

Trampoland Tokyo Bayside

Trampoland’s huge warehouse-like facility is decked out in wall-to-wall trampolines – don’t worry, the space is covered with cushioned walls and nets to protect you from accidental falls. It’s a great spot for families with young children since there’s a dedicated kids’ area for little ones aged three-and-up who are under 110cm tall. You could easily spend the whole day here bouncing around on the trampolines and into the inflatable pillows, but if you’re looking to push yourself, sign up for the timed challenges such as dodgeball and trampoline basketball. Entry starts from ¥1,650 for 60 minutes and if it’s your first time here, there is a registration fee of ¥550, which also gives you access to other Trampoland locations in Tokyo. Changing rooms and lockers are available

Space Athletic Tondemi Heiwajima

Space Athletic Tondemi Heiwajima

One of Japan’s largest trampoline facilities, Tondemi Heiwajima has a great selection of trampolines including free jumping and trampoline ball game areas as well as an 'action jump zone’ in which you complete missions and challenges to advance to the next level, like a video game. You’ll also find foam pits and giant inflatable pillows to relax on when you need a breather. The three-floor venue also features a 40.7m inflatable obstacle course, a tightrope zone, 14 types of climbing walls, a pedal go-kart track and even a digital sports area utilising body sensor technology. Parents of younger children will be glad to know that Tondemi has a special play area set aside for kids under 110cm tall. The facility has changing rooms and lockers as well as free shoe rental. Packages start from ¥3,000 for two hours, but first-timers will need to sign up for a ¥550 membership, which includes a pair of Tondemi grip socks.

Trampon Indoor Park Hachioji

Trampon Indoor Park Hachioji

This indoor trampoline park in Hachioji offers competition-style trampolines to practice your twisting and rotating techniques. It even offers a 2.5m-high wall for more advanced parkour-inspired stunts like backflips. The air mattresses next to the trampolines are perfect for warm-up stretches, and also for practicing other acrobatic sports and gymnastics. While there are no lockers here, you can leave your belongings in the sports room. Take note of the one-time ¥200 membership fee. 

Horse Club Ginza

Horse Club Ginza

This is Japan’s first indoor equestrian club, but instead of actual horses, you’ll be practising on mechanical simulators developed with input from professional equestrians. So rest assured these machines are no amusement park rides; they accurately replicate the sensation of horse-riding. There’s a good range of lessons catering to novices all the way up to expert riders. The ¥3,850 beginner plan lets you try three different movements: walk, trot and canter. Experienced riders, on the other hand, can improve their skills with lessons such as show jumping and cross-country riding, dressage as well as a jockey challenge, where you’ll be racing, albeit virtually, at Dubai’s prestigious Meydan Racecourse. There are horse yoga sessions, too.

City Wave Tokyo

City Wave Tokyo

Just five minutes from Oimachi Station in Shinagawa, City Wave gives you all the thrills of surfing without having to head out to an actual beach. This artificial pool offers waves ranging from 80cm to 120cm in height, and lets you ride on constant and stable waves, which is ideal for learning and developing your own style. The surfing centre provides lessons (¥6,300 for 50 minutes) for beginners all the way up to advanced levels; there are also special classes for kids over seven years old (¥4,000 for 50 minutes). You can even book the entire surf pool for private use. In any case, City Wave will provide you with a soft surfboard, a wet suit and a helmet for free. 

Surfinesse Japan

Surfinesse Japan

Surfinesse in Shonan Chigasaki Southern Beach offers a half-day surfing programme, which if you’re lucky, could even come with a view of Mt Fuji. For your beginner lesson, the instructor will start off with pop-up and paddling practice before you head out to catch the waves. A class generally lasts for three hours – or until you run out of energy. Surf lessons are held every day except Wednesdays and during bad weather. Each beginner session is kept small, with a maximum of four participants, priced at ¥8,000 per person. You can also request a private lesson at ¥12,000.

News (26)

Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo is offering a dreamy dinner buffet accompanied by fireflies

Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo is offering a dreamy dinner buffet accompanied by fireflies

Fireflies, also known as hotaru in Japanese, are a recurring motif in Japanese literature and art, often associated with humid summer nights. With the firefly season almost upon us, Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo is now offering a dreamy dinner plan with a view of twinkling fireflies. Photo: Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo Held in one of the hotel’s sumptuous banquet halls, the Firefly Evening Dinner Buffet offers a sumptuous selection, including the hotel’s famous sirloin roast beef and beef stew, fresh seafood and Chinese specialities. The luxurious spread even comes complete with a colourful sweet buffet filled with fruit tarts, éclairs, panna cotta and more. Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an Ein Beitrag geteilt von ホテル椿山荘東京 Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo (@hotelchinzansotokyo_official) While you're there, don't forget to walk out into the hotel’s famous Chinzanso Garden and you’ll find yourself surrounded by hundreds of twinkling fireflies. Cross the garden’s vermillion Benkei Bridge and listen to the soothing sound of the waterfall and the garden’s singing cicadas – a classic Japanese summer soundscape. The breathtaking mix of the garden’s artificial ‘sea of clouds’ and the magical glowing fireflies will make you forget you’re in the heart of Tokyo.  On days when the weather doesn't permit outdoor activities, you can still view the dancing fireflies from the hotel’s special tunnel-shaped cave, installed behind one of t

Catch 13,000 hydrangeas in bloom around Japan’s longest suspension footbridge

Catch 13,000 hydrangeas in bloom around Japan’s longest suspension footbridge

Aside from having the longest suspension footbridge in Japan – about 400m – Mishima Skywalk in Shizuoka prefecture is also known for hosting one of the biggest hydrangea festivals near Tokyo, attracting visitors of all ages for the huge number of blue hydrangeas blooming in summer. Photo: Mishima SkywalkNatsuzora hydrangeas This year, the Hydrangea Festival will feature about 13,000 hydrangeas across 205 varieties, including Natsuzora (Summer Sky), Skywalk and Hao, the venue’s three original hydrangea species. Photo: Mishima Skywalk Photo spots will be set up along the 2km promenade on the north side of the bridge. They offer lovely scenery with the hydrangeas, Suruga Bay and even Mt Fuji. Photo: Mishima Skywalk For something refreshing after your walk, go to Mishima Skywalk’s Picnic Café for the hydrangea-inspired sundae (¥500). The cup of vanilla ice cream is topped with a crispy waffle and colourful kohakuto candy-jelly. Photo: Mishima Skywalk There’s also a hydrangea-themed pancake (¥1,100) with fresh fruit and hibiscus-flavoured whipped cream. The dessert is available at the Forest Kitchen next to the parking area, so you won’t need an entry ticket to the suspension bridge area to enjoy this treat. Photo: Mishima Skywalk At the Skywalk Café next door, you can get this summery peach and grape-flavoured drink topped with soft serve ice cream (¥500). All the aforementioned hydrangea sweets are available from June 11 until July 15. Photo: Mishima SkywalkHao hydra

The free Olympic Agora exhibition in Nihonbashi features torches, medals and art

The free Olympic Agora exhibition in Nihonbashi features torches, medals and art

With the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics kicking off this week, get yourself in the spirit of the Games with a showcase of sport and art in Nihonbashi. The neighbourhood is celebrating the world’s biggest sporting competition with the Olympic Agora, an exclusive event featuring historical exhibits and impressive contemporary artworks, from July 1 to August 15.  Photo: Time Out Tokyo EdiotorsOlympic Spirit Exhibition The Olympic Spirit Exhibition features 145 items from previous Olympic Games, including posters, torches, medals, and opening ceremony costumes. It’s located on the third floor of Coredo Muromachi Terrace and is divided into three sections: The Power of History/Culture, The Power of Sport, and The Power of Hope.  Photo: Time Out Tokyo EditorsOlympic Spirit Exhibition The Olympic Spirit Exhibition is free and open from 10am to 8pm daily. Advance reservations online are required, although you might be able to get a walk-in spot on a quiet day. Virtual tours are also available on the exhibition’s website.  Photo: © 2021 – IOC/Yuichi Yamazaki – All rights reserved'The Audience' by Xavier Veilhan Just outside Coredo Muromachi Terrace, you can see ‘The Audience,’ a sculpture by world-renowned French artist Xavier Veilhan that was specially commissioned by the Olympic Foundation for Culture and Heritage. This colourful creation shows five people of different generations, each one in the colour of one of the Olympic rings. Photo: Moment Factory'Podium Memories’ Nearby,

These Tokyo museums are open on Monday during the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics

These Tokyo museums are open on Monday during the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics

Most Tokyo museums are closed on Monday. However, some will remain open on selected Mondays during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Here's a list of the museums along with the Mondays they’ll be open in August. ・ Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, August 2 ・ Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, August 2 and 30 ・ Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, August 2 and 30 ・ Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, August 2 and 30 ・ Edo-Tokyo Museum, August 2, 16 and 30 In addition, all five venues will be open on the Mountain Day public holiday, which falls on Monday August 9 this year. Each venue’s special Monday opening hours will be the same as its current weekday business hours. Nevertheless, make sure to check the venue website before you head out.  More from Time Out Tokyo How to watch the Tokyo Olympics online for free How to enjoy the Tokyo Olympics even when you can’t watch the Games in person Where to get official Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic merchandise in Tokyo Download these free craft and colouring pages featuring the Tokyo 2020 Olympic mascots The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Cauldron is now on display in Ariake Want to be the first to know what’s cool in Tokyo? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest updates from Tokyo and Japan.

This Tokyo café is serving ice cream topped with natto. Would you try it?

This Tokyo café is serving ice cream topped with natto. Would you try it?

If you're keen to try some of the uniquely Japanese ice cream flavours such as sesame, sake and hojicha, you might want to add Café au Lait Tokyo to your list. This café and restaurant in Takadanobaba has launched a new dessert option: café-au-lait-flavoured ice cream topped with natto. Photo: Café au Lait Tokyo This base for this unusual creation seems pretty standard as Turkish coffee is used to make the café au lait ice cream. Then it gets a little interesting: the ice cream is garnished with coffee beans and natto (fermented soybeans) mixed in soy sauce, and finished with whipped cream, nuts and kuromitsu (Japan’s answer to molasses).  Photo: Café au Lait Tokyo Despite natto’s reputation for being pungent, the dessert smells rather pleasant, thanks to the soy sauce seasoning. The ice cream pairs well with the bitter coffee beans and salty fermented soybeans that resemble chocolate chips. Photo: Café au Lait TokyoBubble tea-style iced coffee with black natto. Not available. The shop’s idea to pair natto and coffee came about last year, specifically on July 10, which is Natto Day. Initially, the café staff tried adding hot coffee to natto beans, making a kakigori shaved ice dessert with natto, and even a bubble tea-style iced coffee with natto in place of boba.  If all those other concepts sound intriguing to you, we have some bad news. After all the testing, Café au Lait opted to put only its natto-topped ice cream on the menu, ready for the hot and humid summer. Th

Relax in a traditional Finnish sauna and cafe at this new facility in Kanda

Relax in a traditional Finnish sauna and cafe at this new facility in Kanda

Looking for a legit Finnish sauna experience? Kanda Port, opened in Kanda Nishikicho in late-April, features traditional Finnish steam baths and a Nordic-inspired aesthetic. And in case you’re wondering, Kanda Port is not on Tokyo Bay – the name is meant to evoke a place where people from anywhere in the world can rest and relax.You'll find SaunaLab in the basement of the multi-storey building. Designed by sauna expert Yukitaka Yoneda – who also worked on SaunaLab facilities in Nagoya and Fukuoka – it’s based on traditional Finnish sauna culture.  Photo: Kisa Toyoshima There are separate areas for men and women, each featuring lockers, showers, a mildly heated room for whisking (a Finnish sauna massage with dried birch leaves), and a steam room. Then there are the saunas themselves. Each area has a different sauna – don’t worry, you’ll be able to try both, since the men’s and women’s areas are swapped around every Wednesday. Photo: Kisa ToyoshimaOke Sauna The Oke Sauna is a standard sauna room where you pour birch-scented water on stones to make steam. From the outside, the pinewood cabin looks just like a wooden bucket, but on the inside, the walls and the thatched roof will make you feel like you’re sitting in a hut. Photo: Kisa ToyoshimaIke Sauna The Ike Sauna consists of a large, dimly lit chamber that resembles a mountain lodge. It has three stoves, a large basin and even tatami mats to sit on. To really cool down after a steamy sauna session, both areas also featu

Explained: Japan’s four different quarantine rules upon re-entry

Explained: Japan’s four different quarantine rules upon re-entry

[June 22 update] Japan has loosened its quarantine measures for three countries and six American states. However, six new countries have been added to the quarantine categories. See the updates in bold. *** Since January 2021, Japan has temporarily strengthened its border measures for arrivals after coronavirus variants were detected in the country. For now, only citizens and residents with valid documents can re-enter the country – the government has stopped issuing most types of visas, meaning tourists are effectively banned.  Those who are allowed to re-enter Japan must submit proof of a negative result from a Covid-19 test taken within 72 hours before their departure for Japan. Then, they must self-isolate for 14 days after entering the country, while reporting their location and health status daily. They must also refrain from using public transport, even when leaving the airport (here are the available options). However, the rules for 14-day quarantine change frequently, so it's easy to get confused. This overview is a quick reference to help work out which of the three different quarantine measures applies to you.  Quarantine measure 1: First ten days in a government-designated facility Who does it apply to?  Japanese citizens and permanent residents who have been in any of the following countries in the past 14 days: Afghanistan (latest addition to the list; new rules effective June 3), India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, the Maldives or Sri Lanka.  Note that foreign

Tokyo can serve alcohol again from June 21

Tokyo can serve alcohol again from June 21

On Friday June 18, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government decided to relax the prohibition on restaurants and bars serving alcohol when the capital transitions to a quasi-emergency. Kyodo News reports that under the new policy starting Monday June 21, customers will be able to order alcohol provided they are drinking alone or in a group of two, staying for no longer than 90 minutes. Restaurants and bars will be allowed to serve alcohol from 11am to 7pm, but they will still have to close by 8pm. Since the capital's third state of emergency was declared on April 25, restaurants and bars were urged to stop serving alcohol at any time of day, but not all businesses complied with the request. Tokyo recorded 453 new Covid-19 cases on Friday June 18.This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available. More from Time Out Tokyo Japan will implement vaccine passports from JulyGo on a road trip across Japan in a fully equipped camping car with a rooftop tent Catch 13,000 hydrangeas in bloom around Japan’s longest suspension footbridge This community bread stall in Tokyo tackles food waste and unemployment issuesFuji-Q Highland is getting a new 55m-tall observation deck overlooking Mt Fuji Want to be the first to know what’s cool in Tokyo? Sign up to our newsletter for the latest updates from Tokyo and Japan.

Tokyo and six other prefectures will switch to quasi-emergency rules after June 20

Tokyo and six other prefectures will switch to quasi-emergency rules after June 20

On Thursday, the Japanese government formally announced that the current state of emergency covering Tokyo, Osaka, Hokkaido, Aichi, Kyoto, Hyogo, Fukuoka, Okayama and Hiroshima will end as planned on June 20. According to Kyodo News, seven prefectures including Tokyo will switch to quasi-emergency status until July 11, while Okayama and Hiroshima – where case numbers have sufficiently improved – will be freed from emergency measures altogether. On the other hand, Okinawa will stay under a full state of emergency until July 11, as hospitals there remain strained. Under quasi-emergency rules, bars and restaurants will still be asked to close by 8pm. However, they will be allowed to serve alcohol again until 7pm as long as precautions to limit the spread of Covid-19 are followed. Moreover, individual prefectural governors can choose to maintain the ban on selling alcohol if they consider it necessary. Attendance at major events, including sports and concerts, will be capped at 10,000 people, even in prefectures where the emergency has been lifted. Coronavirus cases are declining nationwide while vaccinations continue to climb, but there are still concerns about a possible surge of infections in the run-up to the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, set to begin on July 23. As a result, Kyodo News reports that the Japanese government is considering applying the 10,000-person spectator cap to Olympic Games events as well as a Covid-19 precaution. This is a developing story and will be updated as

東京五輪期間中はまん延防止適用の方針

東京五輪期間中はまん延防止適用の方針

東京都、 大阪府など10都道府県に発令中の緊急事態宣言は予定通り2021年6月20日(日)で解除される見込みだ。解除後の措置に関して、日本政府は東京都を含むいくつかの都道府県を「まん延防止等重点措置」の対象に移行させることを検討しているという。 共同通信によると、現在のところ公式の発表はされていない。しかし「まん延防止等重点措置」は、宣言解除後そのまま東京2020オリンピック会期が終了する8月8日(日)まで同措置に移行するか、一度宣言を解除した上で大会が始まる7月23日(金)までのどこかの時点で同措置をに適用するかになる見込みだ。 同措置は、対象となる都道府県内のより狭い地域に限定して適用されることもあり得る。適用後も飲食店の営業は制限される見込みだが、要請に従わない場合の過料は緊急事態宣言時より低くなる。朝日新聞の報道では酒類の提供は制限、あるいは一部容認の方針。 尾身茂らを含む新型コロナウイルス感染症の専門家グループは、今週中にも東京五輪開催時に想定される感染リスクをまとめる見込み。開催時の最大観客収容人数についても、政府と新型コロナウイルス感染症対策分科会が6月末までに決定するという。 原文はこちら 関連記事 『コロナワクチン用の大規模接種センターが5月24日に東京都で開設へ』 『ニューヨーク市長が7月1日から街を完全再開すると宣言』  『ワクチン接種会場を検索、「新型コロナワクチンマップ」機能が提供開始』 『ワクチンパスポートについて知るべき5のこと』 『緊急事態宣言、沖縄県を正式に追加』  東京の最新情報をタイムアウト東京のメールマガジンでチェックしよう。登録はこちら

This new cheese box subscription delivers real French cheese to your door

This new cheese box subscription delivers real French cheese to your door

Cheese connoisseurs in Japan, this new delivery subscription should satisfy your cravings. Launched just this month, Le Comptoir says it’s the first online shop in Japan to offer monthly subscription boxes filled with imported cheese. Le Comptoir has three different boxes of specially selected European cheese, with amounts varying from month to month. The Cheese Discovery Box (¥3,990 per month) offers two or three varieties of cheese weighing in at roughly 400g in total and is ideal for cheese newbies. The shop’s bestselling Cheese Tasting Box (¥5,990 per month) has a total of 500g to 700g of three or four different cheeses. Meanwhile, for the experienced palates out there, the Cheese Sharing Box (¥7,990 per month) has three or more kinds of cheese coming up to roughly 700g.   Voir cette publication sur Instagram Une publication partagée par Le Comptoir/ル•コントワール🇫🇷 (@lecomptoirdefrance) The wide selection of cheese means there’s something for every taste, with soft creamy camembert, piquant blue Roquefort, sharp fruity Comté, and more from France, Italy, Switzerland and other European countries.  Le Comptoir will deliver the cheese boxes anywhere in Japan for a flat rate of ¥770. Plus, the subscription is flexible, so you can choose to get a box delivered monthly or just every two or three months.  If you need help deciding on your cheese preferences, you can take a free online survey (in Japanese only) on the company website, with results sent by email.

Japan considers placing Tokyo under quasi-emergency during the Olympics

Japan considers placing Tokyo under quasi-emergency during the Olympics

Since April 25, Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, and Hyogo have been under a Covid-19 state of emergency. The measures, which were originally supposed to be lifted on May 11, have been extended twice and the emergency expanded to include Aichi, Fukuoka, Hokkaido, Okayama, Hiroshima and Okinawa.  The state of emergency is currently set to end for all ten prefectures on June 20, but the Japanese government is reportedly now considering moving several of the prefectures – including Tokyo – to quasi-emergency rules after that date. According to Kyodo News, no official decision has been made yet, but the planned quasi-state of emergency could be in place from June until the end of the Olympics on August 8, or could be lifted and reimposed before the Games begin on July 23. Under quasi-emergency rules, restaurants and bars will still be asked to limit opening hours but may be allowed to sell alcohol, and there would be lower fines for noncompliance. In addition, governors will be allowed to impose measures in specific areas rather than entire prefectures.  A group of infectious disease experts is due to reveal this week the health risks possible if the Olympics go ahead as planned. Moreover, the government and the organising committee will decide by the end of June on the maximum number of local spectators allowed at Olympic events. This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available. More from Time Out Tokyo Tokyo’s Shinjuku ward will prioritise vaccinating ad