Higashiya Ginza1/6
Photo: Higashiya Ginza
Miyabian2/6
Photo: Keisuke TanigawaMiyabian
Toraya Akasaka3/6
Photo: Toraya AkasakaToraya Akasaka
Seigetsudo Honten4/6
Photo: Kisa ToyoshimaSeigetsudo Honten
Ginza Akebono5/6
Photo: Ginza Akebono
Miyabian6/6
Photo: Keisuke TanigawaMiyabian

Best wagashi shops and cafés in Tokyo

Japan’s traditional sweets are the perfect teatime treat, or secret snack – here are Tokyo’s top confectionery shops

By Jessica Thompson
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Japan’s beautifully crafted wagashi are the perfect accompaniment to a cup of tea. Made from just a few simple ingredients – mochi, bean paste, jelly, seasonal fruit and flowers – these traditional sweets become stunning works of edible art in the hands of a skillful master. 

There are nine basic types of wagashi, and if you’ve ever been to a Japanese tea ceremony or sampled some local street food, you’ve definitely tasted a few of them. From dorayaki to manju, Tokyo is teeming with shops selling delectable traditional sweets.

Here are the top places in Tokyo to get a gift-ready box of wagashi to go, or treat yourself and sit down for a nice relaxing tea – paired with plenty of tasty treats, of course.

RECOMMENDED: Don’t know your dango from your daifuku? Read our ultimate guide to wagashi.

Where to buy wagashi

Ginza Fugetsudo
Ginza Fugetsudo
Photo: Kisa Toyoshima

Ginza Fugetsudo

Restaurants Ginza

Ginza Fugetsudo is a sophisticated wagashi salon tucked away on the second floor of a nondescript Ginza building. Here wagashi are made fresh-to-order at the open counter – a rare experience, even in Japan. The wagashi on offer are seasonal, so during summer, you might be served a sweet resembling a green forest canopy, with tinted bean paste and topped with shimmering clear jelly. 

Yoshinobu Tsuruya
Yoshinobu Tsuruya
Photo: Yoshinobu Tsuruya

Yoshinobu Tsuruya Toranomon Hills

Shopping Toranomon

The clean lines, spacious arrangement, and minimal aesthetic of this shop in Toranomon Hills Business Tower make it look more like an art gallery. Wagashi are lined up neatly on the display counters, with many distinctive varieties available, like bite-sized dorayaki (¥151 each) filled with lemon-scented bean paste, monaka wafers resembling macarons, and yokan in interesting flavors like sakuranbo cherry, lemon, and yoghurt. 

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Miyabian
Miyabian
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Miyabian

Shopping Nakameguro

Miyabian in Nakameguro has been selling its expertly crafted wagashi since 2004. Don’t be fooled by the tiny shopfront – the wagashi offering is extensive. Miyabian’s selection covers year-round staples: kinako mochi, warabi mochi and mame-daifuku. Plus, the shop has seasonal specials like a nerikiri inspired by Japanese morning glory flowers in green, white and pink topped with a sunlight-sparkle of gold leaf.

Toraya Akasaka
Toraya Akasaka
Photo: Toraya Akasaka

Toraya Akasaka

Shopping Akasaka

Toraya’s long and storied history dates back over 500 years and the company served as a confectionery supplier to the Imperial Court in Kyoto. The brand’s Akasaka location reopened in late 2018, with an elegant refurbishment. From the reception area, head to the third floor to see Toraya’s expertly crafted sweets, each resembling miniature artworks. If you’ve got time, take a seat in the spacious cafe and try wagashi with Japanese tea. On the basement floor, there’s a gallery with regularly changing exhibitions on wagashi culture and history, too.  

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Seigetsudo Honten
Seigetsudo Honten
Photo: Kisa Toyoshima

Seigetsudo Honten

Restaurants Higashi-Ginza

With lofty ceilings, ikebana displays, gold screen backdrop and washi paper-lights, the interior of Seitsudo feels refined and traditional. It’s fitting decor for the Ginza location, which has been frequented by locals for over 100 years. The speciality of the store is its original type of wagashi, called otoshibumi, which has a texture somewhere between a steamed bun and a cookie – soft, but a bit crumbly. 

Higashiya Ginza
Higashiya Ginza
Photo: Higashiya Ginza

Higashiya Ginza

Restaurants Tea rooms Ginza

Come here for the complete experience: seasonal wagashi over seasonal brews. This tea salon is an expert in putting a fresh new twist on traditional Japanese confectionery, and you’ll be spoilt for choice with over 40 varieties of tea on their menu.

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Matsuya Ginza
Matsuya Ginza
Photo: Matsuya Ginza

Matsuya Ginza

Shopping Ginza

The basement floor of Matsuya department store is a wonderland for wagashi lovers, with over ten different vendors to choose from. There’s everything from gold-topped castella cake to soft warabi mochi and freshly made dorayaki. Keep an eye out for the interesting Japanese-Western fusion options, like a rich chocolate truffle wrapped in a soft mochi sheath. 

Ginza Akebono
Ginza Akebono
Photo: Ginza Akebono

Ginza Akebono

Shopping Ginza

This is the main store of one of Tokyo’s most renowned wagashi shops, located in the centre of Ginza, across from the Wako building. It offers a variety of traditional sweets including dorayaki, ohagi and rice crackers. Get your strawberry daifuku here when it’s in season. 

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Newoman-Ekinaka

Shopping Shinjuku

Inside the ticket gates of JR Shinjuku’s New South Exit, numerous food shops are strategically placed for you to pick up some last minute gifts before boarding the train. Among them, Yui offers delicate and artistic wagashi, including a yokan bearing the image of Mt Fuji (when cut into slices). You should also look out for Ninigi’s fresh fruit daifuku.

Your ultimate wagashi photo menu

Guide to wagashi

Restaurants

Wagashi are the dainty Japanese sweets made for teatime. But can you tell your daifuku from your monaka and dorayaki?

Know more, eat more

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