Tsukiji Shouro1/6
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa
Tsukiji street food - sashimi2/6
Photo: Jonathan Forage/Unsplash
Kakigoya3/6
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa
Maguro Kushiyaki4/6
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa
Tsukiben5/6
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa
Tsukiji Shouro6/6
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Best street food and snacks at Tsukiji Market

There’s still plenty to eat at the bustling Tsukiji: tamagoyaki omelette sandwiches, tuna sashimi, grilled scallops and more

By Jessica Thompson and Time Out Tokyo Editors
Advertising

After a bit of uncertainty following the opening of the Toyosu Fish Market in 2018, the Tsukiji Market is once again one of the best places in the city to visit for street eats. Many of the market restaurants have food stalls out front, and the seafood shops sell samples of fresh fish and shellfish to eat on the spot. In the grid of narrow streets and alleys, you’ll find vendors tucked into the most improbable of spaces.

Tsukiji is famed for its raw seafood offerings, but there’s also plenty of the cooked variety, grilled fresh to order, as well as non-seafood options, sweets and drinks. Stores open by 9am, so you can go for breakfast – and even wash it down with sake or beer, if it’s that kind of morning.

RECOMMENDED: The best restaurants at Tsukiji Market

Kakigoya
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Kakigoya

Restaurants Tsukiji

Kakigoya is a seafood izakaya with a stall out front selling steamed oysters and grilled scallops to order. Giant scallops (¥500 each) are cooked in a combination of butter, soy sauce and sake until they’re tender. Plump oysters are steamed in a metal tin (¥500 for two). If raw oysters are your thing, you can knock them back freshly shucked for ¥700 apiece. Wine and draft beer are available by the cup for ¥500, too.

Tsukiji Shouro
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Tsukiji Shouro Honten

Restaurants Tsukiji

Established in 1924 as a sushi shop, Shouro switched to tamagoyaki during WWII and has been specialising in Japanese omelettes ever since. You can buy tamagoyaki on a stick or in little bite-sized pieces, but we recommend the tamagoyaki sando (sandwich) for ¥500. It’s filled with a juicy omelette, smeared with Japanese mayonnaise and encased in fresh shokupan (white bread). Even better, from 10am-2pm each day you can try your hand at making tamagoyaki and take your efforts home – for free! 

Advertising
Soratsuki
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Soratsuki

Restaurants Tsukiji

The gem-like form of ichigo daifuku make them pop amongst the seafood offerings at Tsukiji: a ball of sweetened bean paste, wrapped in mochi (rice cake) dough, with a ripe strawberry in the middle. The juicy flesh of the fresh strawberry makes these mochi a must. At Soratsuki, you can go for the classic red bean paste, or experiment with variations like yomogi (Japanese mugwort), pastry cream, mango, yuzu, matcha and edamame. They cost ¥350 for one piece or three for ¥1,050.

まぐろや黒銀
Maguroya Kurogin

Maguroya Kurogin Tsukiji Honten

Shopping Tsukiji

Maguroya specialises in tuna; here, you can try the top cuts of tuna in sashimi and nigiri-style. At the top of the range is the kama-toro (special fatty tuna, ¥800 for a piece of nigiri), which is the highly prized neck meat. Next in line is the otoro (fatty tuna, ¥550), followed by chu-toro (medium fatty tuna, ¥400) and akami (lean tuna, ¥250). If you’d rather skip the rice, try the sashimi plates – you can get three types of tuna for ¥2,000.

Advertising
Maguro Kushiyaki
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Tsukiji Jyogai Shijyo Maguro Kushiyaki

Restaurants Tsukiji

The gregarious griller behind the barbecue at Tsukiji Jyogai Shijyo Maguro Kushiyaki will explain to you that just a little sake, salt and pepper is all that’s needed to create the perfect stick of cooked tuna. And once you taste the skewers here, you won’t disagree. The tuna takes on a meatiness once cooked, softened by natural fat, and enhanced by the simple seasonings.

Tsukiben
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Tsukiben

Restaurants Tsukiji

Inarizushi – pockets of sweetened tofu filled with rice – are the perfect base for all sorts of toppings at Tsukiben. The shop showcases classic Tsukiji offerings in heaping piles: crab, ikura (salmon caviar), uni (sea urchin), fatty tuna and various combinations of these are available for ¥500 to ¥1,000 each. The crab and ikura inarizushi (¥500) is our pick: the salty bursts of ikura balance the delicate sweetness of the crab perfectly.

Advertising
Matcha Stand Maruni
Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa

Matcha Stand Maruni

Restaurants Tsukiji

At this stylish little shop, order an iced or hot matcha latte (regular ¥600, soy milk ¥650) and watch it whisked in front of you, using the hypnotic traditional technique. All drinks are free of preservatives, and sweetened drinks use a syrup made from cane sugar. Matcha comes with a little daifuku (sweet chewy rice cake), to complete the tea experience. Inside, find a range of matcha-related paraphernalia, perfect if you want to try recreating the drinks at home.

Ajino-Hamato Tsukiji Honten

Shopping Tsukiji

This 80-year-old store stocks an assortment of seafood-based treats, including pickled and dried fish, satsuma-age (deep-fried minced fish and vegetables) and more. Try the squid dumplings, which are made with fish paste and comprise a crunchy exterior that gives way to a fluffy centre. The corn fritters are good, too; they contain fish paste for added depth of flavour and are available only at Tsukiji.

Advertising

Tsukiji Eel Eatery – Nisshin Tasuke

Restaurants Street food Tsukiji

As one of Japan's more decadent treats, eel is usually one of the less wallet-friendly items on the menu. This speciality shop doesn't treat its eel as a luxury item though; instead, it cooks up a variety of styles to enjoy in a relaxed setting. Inside, you can sample their eel rice bowls (or ‘giga’ sized eel over rice if you're feeling especially gluttonous), among other dishes, but for a quick, cheap snack, you can't beat their grilled eel skewers (¥200), which come in both plain and sauce-slathered varieties.

Yoshizawa Shoten

Shopping Tsukiji

In a departure from Tsukiji's usual seaside theme, Yoshizawa Shoten is actually a butcher shop that handles mainly beef, including Japan's famed black beef. It also sells street snacks, such as the aforementioned black beef pickled in saikyo miso, as well as beef cutlets and grilled pork. The fatty Matsuzaka beef minced meat cakes are the pick of the bunch though – made with 100 percent ground Matsuzaka beef for a rich, juicy snack.

Advertising

Kibun Sohonten

Shopping Tsukiji

Nerimono, the cooked ground fish found in traditional Japanese dishes from oden to New Year's osechi ryori, is the speciality at this longstanding purveyor in Tsukiji's outer market. Given an extra garnish at the shop, the freshly kneaded, simple snacks served here are all top quality and bring out the original flavours of the ingredients. You'll want to try the Tsukiji Fry, a kamaboko stick made of crab-flavoured surimi seafood.

Suga Shoten

Restaurants Street food Tsukiji

The odd-ball of the Tsukiji over-the-counter market, Suga Shoten sells dim sum items that are cooked in traditional steamers. The small meat buns are a good choice – generously stuffed and wrapped in a thin layer of dough – while the succulent black pork dumplings, made with pork shoulder roast from Abel farm pigs in Kagoshima prefecture, are juicy and delicious.

Advertising

Saito Fisheries

Shopping Tsukiji

If you've had enough sushi for a while but still crave something raw, then this store in the outer market is your stop. There's no passing on the raw oysters (¥500, price may change depending on the catch): these thick, sizeable specimens are some of the freshest you'll ever find and they make the perfect one-bite delicacy. Make sure to also check out the shop's Facebook and Twitter feeds for info on the latest catch.

Sanoki-ya

Restaurants Cafés Tsukiji

You'd be forgiven for thinking that the 'grilled tuna' advertised at this outer market shop was a savoury snack, but don't be fooled. The dish on offer is taiyaki, and while the term means grilled sea bream, here it's actually a fish-shaped dessert that consists of a pancake shell filled with red bean paste. Sanoki-ya's 'tuna' version gets a thick body, which is shaped a little like a tuna fish, hence the name. If you're in the mood for something fruity, you can also sample the 'medium-fatty tuna' dessert made from apricots.

Advertising
Le Pain Tsukiji
Photo: Time Out Tokyo

Le Pain

Restaurants Bakeries Tsukiji

It's not all fish on a stick at Tsukiji, round off (or kick off) a visit to the market at this Namiyoke-dori bread shop, where you can perk up your morning with freshly baked pastries and freshly brewed coffee. For a Western snack with a Japanese twist, you can't go wrong with their red bean-paste croissants, but if you're looking for something especially decadent, then their cream--filled vanilla croissants are also worth a go. From the savoury side of the counter, the potato curry pies and simple, yet delicious, whole grain egg sandwich should satisfy.

Read More

Advertising
Tsukemen Gonokami Seisakusho 五ノ神製作所
Photo: Kisa Toyoshima

Best ramen in Tokyo

Restaurants Ramen

From old-school noodles and tonkotsu classics to soupless tsukemen and spicy favourites – you'll be bowled over by these ramen

Recommended

    You may also like

      Advertising