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Eastern State Penitentiary
Photograph: Shutterstock Eastern State Penitentiary

Visit the most haunted places in the U.S. right from your couch

Looking for a ghost? Embark on these virtual tours of the most haunted places in the U.S. from the safety of your home.

By Danielle Valente
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Virtual experiences are having a moment. While you can spend your time feeling all warm and cozy, we recommend having a chilling adventureif you dare. Alleged haunted places throughout the country, including the Winchester Mystery House and Eastern State Penitentiary, are offering guests virtual tours while the grounds are closed. If you're feeling gutsy and won't get spooked by a few apparitions—though we can't guarantee you'll see 'em—we suggest checking out these cool digital tours. But if the thought alone is too frightening, consider at-home musts like playing online party games with pals, following one of these easy cocktail recipes or streaming an addictive doc

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Virtual ghost tours

 Winchester House
 Winchester House
Photograph: Courtesy Winchester House

1. Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, CA

Sarah Winchester spent 38 years intricately remodeling her home into the sprawling 24,000 square-foot mansion. There was seemingly no architectural rhyme or reason to the property's design—there are unfinished staircases, misplaced windows, a door that leads nowhere. However, it's believed that this labyrinth-like layout intended to confuse the spirits of those killed by the Winchester Repeating Arms' guns (the company Sarah inherited from her husband's family). Finding your way out of this confusing attraction might be more challenging than finding spirits.

Take the virtual tour   

Pittock Mansion
Pittock Mansion
Photograph: Shutterstock

2. Pittock Mansion in Portland, OR

Henry and Georginia Pittock, who made their fortune in the newspaper industry, had plans to retire and revel in Portland's panoramic views. They began construction on an impresive French Renaissance-style château, which was completed in 1914. However, they only lived there for four years until they passed away. Relatives inherited the home, which was later abandoned and eventually damaged in the Columbus Day Storm in 1962. But residents fought to keep the property open after the destruction, and two years later, the Pittock Mansion relaunched as a museum. Some say the Pittocks are still there—after all, they truly didn't have too much time to enjoy the grounds. Don't be alarmed though: Visitors claim to see apparitions of the husband and wife duo, but they are supposedly friendly spirits. Well, that'sreassuring. 

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Eastern State Penitentiary
Eastern State Penitentiary
Photograph: Shutterstock

3. Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia, PA

The world's first penitentiary—and most expensive, at one time—housed dangerous criminals like Al Capone, Leo Callahan and Freda Frost. Now, the menacing gothic structure is empty, though many claim there is still plenty lurking in the abandoned cellblocks. 

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Lizzie Borden B&B
Lizzie Borden B&B
Photograph: Shutterstock

4. Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast Museum in Fall River, MA

The quaint Victorian home in New England seems innocent enough, but its history is far from rosy. Back in 1892, a young woman named Lizzie Borden was accused of murdering her father and stepmom with an axe, though she was never proven guilty. If you're brave enough, you can even crash here overnight.

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QE Long Beach, CA
QE Long Beach, CA
Photograph: Shutterstock

5. The Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA

Not all of this famed ship's passengers had a comforting experience. Just take it from the Lady in White and the man who was believed to have met his fate in the Queen Mary's boiler room, who are said to haunt the vessel to this day. Think you can hop aboard for a peek with their spirits still roaming? You're brave, dude. 

Take a virtual tour

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