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New movie reviews: New York listings and showtimes

Find the latest movie reviews for movies playing in New York this week

Looking for a movie to see tonight or this weekend? Check out these new movie reviews by Time Out critics. Click on a listing for full reviews, trailers and showtimes, or consult our A-Z list of movie theaters in New York.

A Poem Is a Naked Person

Les Blank’s long-lost Leon Russell doc unfolds like a southern-fried Almost Famous that’s been stitched together from all the observations that a scripted film would leave out. Shot between 1972 and 1974 and buried for more than four decades after Russell balked at the final cut, this masterful collage works because Blank knows that the music is just
a rollicking good excuse to get together and be alive.—DE

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Amy

Anyone with a beating heart will be forgiven for allowing it to break during this unflinching and thoughtful account of the life of soul singer Amy Winehouse. Moving from Winehouse’s first steps into the music business in 2001 to her death in 2011 at just 27, Amy gives equal weight to her talent and the tragedy of its loss. Smartly, the film refuses to offer easy answers to explain her demise.—Dave Calhoun 

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Ant-Man

Marvel’s smallest origin story begins with scientist Hank Pym (Douglas), the inventor of a top-secret particle capable of shrinking ordinary objects down to insect size. Ousted from his own tech company, Hank needs a skilled stooge to break into his old lab and steal some research, and sweet-natured thief Scott Lang (Rudd) is the only man for the job. Rudd is inhibited in the role, as if he felt there was too much at stake, and that impulse to play it safe typifies a film that shrinks in the face of a challenge.—David Ehrlich

 

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Dope

Rick Famuyiwa’s comedy follows three high-school nerds who call Los Angeles’ frightening Inglewood home. It’s a euphorically funny indie that flips the script on Boyz n the Hood.

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Far From the Madding Crowd

Burning with understated passion and a fine central performance from Carey Mulligan, Thomas Hardy’s romantic classic comes to life in an adaptation that’s far from stodgy. 

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Infinitely Polar Bear

Line up now for Mark Ruffalo’s most complex and likable performance to date, as a mentally unstable parent who, despite frequent mood swings, must care for two rambunctious girls.

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Inside Out

Critics' pick

Pixar’s fun, near-experimental latest will have kids straining to listen to imaginary voices in their heads—those are the real stars of the movie: Joy (Poehler), Fear (Hader), Anger (Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith). At times, you ache to put the brakes on the chaos, but the animation studio once again turns childhood into the stuff of rare and riveting adventure.—DC

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Irrational Man

Woody Allen’s latest, a deadly straight drama, gives us Abe (Phoenix), a philosophy lecturer at a small East Coast college. Rita (Posey) is a fellow professor who wants to sleep with him, while student Jill (Stone) insists that her interest is purely platonic. It all feels pretty familiar for Woody: the tortured genius, the younger woman, the world closing in on our antihero. But there’s something sloppy about Irrational Man, even by Allen’s uneven standards.—DC

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Jurassic World

The slickly entertaining sequel has no reason for being (except for the obvious one), but at least it chomps your time painlessly. There’s a fully functioning tourist attraction on the haunted grounds of Isla Nublar some 22 years after the first film, complete with a Starbucks and huge crowds. Subtly—between generic action sequences—the movie celebrates money and itself, not science.—JR

 

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Love & Mercy

Beach Boy genius Brian Wilson loved being nestled in the recording studio, and to watch the delicate Paul Dano (a magically right choice with a beautiful voice) steer his ace session band through what would become Pet Sounds is to have a piece of rock history re-created right before your eyes. Wilson, a pop savant, was chasing some kind of dragon, and as the movie toggles years forward to the scared, overmedicated Wilson of the 1980s (Cusack, absorbingly strange in the tougher part), you sense that the dragon bit back.—JR

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Comments

1 comments
Jason Krawczyk
Jason Krawczyk

My movie "The Briefcase" was recently released and I was hoping your site would be interested in reviewing it. I can send you a copy of the DVD or direct you to a link for viewing. Thank you, big fan of the site, and keep up the good work. http://everyonequestion.com/the-briefcase-release-date Title: The Briefcase Writer/Director: Jason Krawczyk/me Genre: Crime/Comedy Runtime: 80 minutes Stars: Kip Pardue, Vincent Pastor, Keith Nobbs thebriefcasemovie.com