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Joshua Rothkopf

Joshua Rothkopf

Joshua Rothkopf is Time Out's former Global Deputy Film Editor and Senior Film Critic.

Articles (341)

The best Broadway shows for kids right now

The best Broadway shows for kids right now

Theater is a big part of what makes New York shine. This city is bursting with talent that even the youngest among us can appreciate, and at the best Broadway shows for kids, everyone in your crew will be captivated. The Lion King, with its dancing wildlife and catchy songs, is a perennial favorite, but Disney aficionados will also get a kick out of the magical tale of Aladdin. At Wicked, you can visit the land of Oz and its conflicted green-skinned protagonist; at Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, you can enter an entirely different world of witches and strange creatures. These long-running hits are joined by newer offerings like Six and & Juliet, which may appeal to older kids. RECOMMENDED: More theater for kids in NYC If you've already caught these shows or are looking for something a little different, you won't have to go far: Be sure to explore our favorite Off Broadway shows for kids, too, where the stories can be just as memorable as their Broadway counterparts and the talent equally impressive. Make the day more memorable by hitting up one of our favorite fun restaurants for kids or the best family friendly restaurants before or after the show.

All the Marvel movies ranked from worst to best

All the Marvel movies ranked from worst to best

As much as we love Sam Raimi’s 2002 Spider-Man (and can even roll with Ang Lee’s psychodrama of a Hulk movie), the Marvel Cinematic Universe technically begins with 2008’s game-changing Iron Man, the film that kicked off a franchise with hugeness in mind. The MCU has firmly kicked back into gear, with Eternals making waves at the box-office and Shang-Chi and Legend of the Ten Rings giving the MCU a burst of martial arts style. But it hasn’t always been an easy road. Tempting the wrath of passionate viewers, we’ve ranked the 29 films to date – all of them blockbusters, but some more blockbustery than others. The latest to join the superhero party? Taika Waititi’s Thor: Love and Thunder and Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther: Wakanda Forever. But where do those two land? Read on to find out. You can watch all the Marvel films on Disney+. Click here to find out more. Recommended: 🦸🏿 The 50 best comic book movies of all time💣 The 101 best action movies ever made🔪 The 31 best serial killer movies🕵️ 40 murder mysteries to test your sleuthing skills to the max

The 100 best movies of all time

The 100 best movies of all time

Warning: the list you’re about to read is guaranteed to raise your blood pressure, make your veins bulge and possibly rupture your larynx screaming, ‘What the hell are these idiots thinking?!’ That’s the nature of publishing an article about the greatest movies of all-time. Any discussion about movies inevitably gets heated, and that’s a good thing. Few artistic mediums generate the same kind of passion among its most strident fans as cinema. Sure, music, literature and television can get folks riled up, too. But something about film is different. Movies live with us in a way great songs and books don’t. They shape who we are and how we see the world. Watch a favourite movie enough, and gradually it doesn’t just become a creature comfort or a nostalgic trigger – it almost becomes a lived-in experience. And so, yes, if you read a list of the greatest movies ever made, and your fave isn’t on there, well, people can get a bit annoyed. Mad, even. We welcome it, though, because as you’ll read, we’re passionate, too. (Although if you must yell at us, please remain civil.) We cannot guarantee this list lines up perfectly with your own personal canon. But when it comes to genres, eras, countries and content, you’ll find a little bit of everything, from blockbusters to art films, cult classics to slapstick comedies, bloody actioners to even bloodier horror flicks. Even while trying to cover all our bases, there’s surely something that’ll set you off for one reason or another. And that

The 101 best action movies of all time

The 101 best action movies of all time

Action is one of cinema’s most misunderstood genres. Not that it ever hurts them at the box office – the general public loves them, of course. Among highfalutin cineastes, action movies are too often considered trashy, low-brow junk food, replacing all story and substance with eardrum-shattering explosions and mindless violence. In a lot of cases – maybe even most of them – that characterisation is certainly true. But anyone who’s ever allowed their senses to get shattered by the booms, blasts and breaking bones of a truly great action movie knows that there are few moviegoing experiences that can compare.   Also, not all action movies need be loud and dumb. The right director can choreograph violence with almost balletic grace, while the right actors actually make you care about the person trying to outrun the bullets and the bombs. This list of the greatest action films ever made is proof that the genre is more versatile than it appears. We polled over 50 experts in the field, from Die Hard director John McTiernan to Machete himself, Danny Trejo, along with Time Out’s writers, and the results show just how awesome and unique the best action movies can be when done correctly. Written by Eddy Frankel, Eddy Frankel, Joshua Rothkopf, Trevor Johnston, Ashley Clark, Grady Hendrix, Tom Huddleston, Keith Uhlich, Dave Calhoun, Phil de Semlyen,  Dave Calhoun & Matthew Singer Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time😬 The 100 best thrillers of all-time🌊 33 great disaster movie

The 50 most-deserving Oscar winners of all time

The 50 most-deserving Oscar winners of all time

To the victor goes the spoils – and to the losers goes the social media outrage. That’s effectively how the Oscars operate. As the actual telecast honours the year’s standout cinematic performances, viewers jump on Twitter to express righteous anger over just how wrong the voters got it. It makes sense: the Academy has screwed up often enough that you almost expect it to happen half the time. Every once in a while, though, the Academy gets it spot-on – and those instances deserve recognition. Here are 50 times when they nailed the bullseye. Recommended: 👎 The 20 worst Oscar winners in history👍 The best films of 2022🙌 The most anticipated movies coming out in 2023🔥 The 100 best movies of all time

50 películas que hay que ver al menos una vez en la vida

50 películas que hay que ver al menos una vez en la vida

Cada uno tiene sus preferencias, así que cualquier debate sobre cuáles son las mejores películas de todos los tiempos se puede alargar horas (o, en nuestro caso, toda la vida). ¿Puede haber alguna lista que las agrupe a todas? Es difícil, pero hemos intentado incorporar desde las revoluciones cinematográficas más clásicas hasta las más modernas, grandes estrenos, todos los géneros, países, épocas... cine para todos los gustos, haciendo equilibrios entre la racionalidad y el sentimentalismo. El reto ha sido enormemente complicado, pero no nos hemos podido resistir a elaborar una buena lista, nuestra lista. Decidnos hasta qué punto nos hemos equivocado. ¡Y, ah, prohibido repetir directores! RECOMENDADO: Las 50 mejores películas para ver en familia. 

The 101 best sex scenes in movies of all time

The 101 best sex scenes in movies of all time

At the moment, Hollywood appears to be a bit sexually frustrated. Whether it’s because of a general puritanical shift in pop culture or the recent debates over the merits of cinematic sex scenes, it’s been a while since we’ve seen a sweaty, steamy, on-screen romp between the sheets in a major mainstream film. It’s a shame, because lust is an important part of life – and thus should be an important part of movies. So let’s talk about sex, baby. This list should put to bed (ahem) the idea that sex on film is always about mere titillation. No doubt, sometimes, arousal is the whole point – and there’s nothing wrong with that. But in the best examples, sex is storytelling. It tells us something about the characters. It can be a joke, or a source of fear, anxiety and frustration. In other words, sex communicates many emotions beyond sheer carnal desire. So slip into something more comfortable – these are the 101 best sex scenes of all time.  Written by Dave Calhoun, Joshua Rothkopf, Cath Clarke, David Ehrlich, Phil de Semlyen, Daniel Walber, Trevor Johnston, Andy Kryza, Daniel Walber and Matthew Singer Recommended: 🕯️ The 35 steamiest erotic thrillers ever made🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time❤ The 100 best romantic films of all-time😬 The 50 most controversial movies ever made💪 The 100 best feminist films of all-time

The 50 most controversial movies ever made

The 50 most controversial movies ever made

Not all press is good press, particularly when it comes to the most controversial movies ever made. Yes, in some cases, films that may have otherwise faded from memory have achieved a level of immortality simply because they’ve managed to scandalise audiences across decades. A lot of times, though, controversy can exile a movie to the margins, existing only as a rite of passage for hardcore cineastes to seek out. Some of these movies have been banned, destroyed careers, and a rare few even led to criminal charges.  Even the most unsavory have great stories behind them, though. That’s why we’ve indulged the curiosity of our readers with a list of the most controversial movies of all-time. Some are pioneering classics that helped push boundaries and break conventions both social and cinematic, and have come to be seen as true classics. Others might still make audiences clutch their proverbial pearls today.  Written by Joshua Rothkopf, David Fear, Keith Uhlich, Andy Kryza & Matthew Singer Recommended: 🤘The 40 best cult movies of all-time🔪 The 31 best serial killer movies😳 The 35 steamiest erotic thrillers🍆 The 101 best sex scenes in movies of all-time

The 65 best documentaries of all time

The 65 best documentaries of all time

Thanks to that high-quality camera in our pocket, we’re all documentarians these days. But a great documentary film isn’t simply about capturing real life on video and sticking it on social media. A truly masterful doc frames our understanding of the world. It can change how we see reality and the people around us. In many cases, it makes us look inward, and maybe even see ourselves differently. It does, however, seem like we’re living in a time of documentary overload. So that’s why we’ve dug through the entire history of cinema – literally, the first docs go back to the very beginning of the form – to sort the must-sees from the glorified TikTok videos. From a simple clip of a train pulling into a station to Andy Warhol gazing up at the Empire State Building for eight hours, from Bob Dylan accosting reporters to an animated navigation of the horrors of war, here are our picks for the best documentaries ever made. Written by Joshua Rothkopf, Cath Clarke, Tom Huddleston, David Fear, Dave Calhoun, Phil de Semlyen, Andy Kryza, David Ehrlich and Matthew Singer Recommended: ✅ The 20 best movies based on true stories🔎 The best true crime documentaries on Netflix🤘 10 unforgettable concert films to watch from home🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time

The 20 best Thanksgiving movies for your post-feast viewing

The 20 best Thanksgiving movies for your post-feast viewing

In the American popular consciousness, Thanksgiving gets short shrift. It’s a speed bump on the road to Christmas – a high-stress dinner featuring those annoying relatives who typically get disinvited from the real holiday gathering. And so it is with the movies. ‘Christmas movies’ are bountiful. Thanksgiving movies? You’ve got to dig a bit deeper.   But that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few Turkey Day classics out there worthy of annual viewings. And we don’t just mean movies that have a fleeting scene set around the dinner table in late November – sorry, The Godfather Part II. When we talk about the best Thanksgiving movies ever, we mean those that say something about the holiday itself, and what it means to share a meal with the people you love, begrudgingly or not. Some will make you cry, others make you cry from laughter. If you’re from America, they’ll certainly ring true to your own memories. And if you’ve never had the chance to gorge yourself on mashed potatoes while listening to Uncle Jimmy’s conspiracy theories, well, these’ll all you a little closer to the true experience.     Recommended: 🎄 The 50 best Christmas movies of all-time🎃 The best Halloween movies of all-time🎆 The best Fourth of July movies to watch on Independence Day

The 100 best horror movies of all time

The 100 best horror movies of all time

Horror movies have rarely got the respect they deserve. Sometimes, it’s for good reason. Particularly in the 1970s and ’80s, the genre became a magnet for hacks and hucksters looking to make a quick buck via the burgeoning VHS video by crapping out a script and dousing horny teens in gallons of stage blood. But that phenomenon had a generational trickle-down effect, staining even the smarter, more artful entries with the taint of schlock.   Only recently has that started to change. Visionary auteurs like Ari Aster and Jordan Peele, and leftfield hits like A Quiet Place, It Follows and Get Out have brought horror to a higher standing in the cinematic universe. But let this list of the greatest horror movies ever made repudiate the idea that the genre has ever been of lesser value than others. After all, every film exists to make an audience feel something – and what makes you feel more than a good horror movie? Among our picks, you’ll find films that mine universal human fears, whether it’s the fear of death and disease or more specific phobias. Some stretch the boundaries of what can be shown on screen, but others can raise the hairs on your arms through mere suggestion.  There is, after all, more than one way to scare someone – and these movies do it better than all others. Written by Tom Huddleston, Cath Clarke, Dave Calhoun, Nigel Floyd, Phil de Semlyen, David Ehrlich, Joshua Rothkopf, Nigel Floyd, Andy Kryza, Alim Kheraj and Matthew Singer Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best mov

The 50 best ’80s movies, ranked

The 50 best ’80s movies, ranked

Everything got bigger in the 1980s: the music, the drugs, the hair and certainly the movies. And for a long time, that wasn’t thought of as a good thing – particularly when it came to the movies. It was the era of the blockbuster, when budgets exploded and mainstream films were broader and louder and more violent than ever before. After the ’70s New Hollywood revolution, it felt like a glossy and superficial time in the moment, full of easily disposable entertainment that would be quickly forgotten.   In retrospect, however, it’s easier to see how important and influential the period was. It was a time when the biggest movies were also some of the best. It was when the previous decade’s most beloved directors – David Lynch, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg et al – truly came into their own, and when the newcomers who’d rule the following decade, like Spike Lee and the Coen brothers, announced their arrivals. Audiences became more attuned to international  cinema and the American indie movement began to bubble under the surface.  Declaring any decade the ‘best’ for movies is always a matter of generational bias, but if nothing else, the films of the ’80s were certainly the most idiosyncratic, and these 50 films define the era. These are the movies any cineaste worth their salted popcorn must see – ideally on a VHS tape with bad tracking. Written by Joshua Rothkopf, Tom Huddleston, Dave Calhoun, Andy Kryza, Cath Clarke, Matthew Singer & Phil de Semlyen Recommended: 🔥 The 100

Listings and reviews (597)

Monos

Monos

4 out of 5 stars

En una muntanya, un esquadró paramilitar d’adolescents s’entrena per a una guerra sense nom. Juguen a futbol amb els ulls tapats i manipulen fusells carregats. Enfangats, prometen fidelitat a una organització abstracta i obeeixen les seves ordres a través d’un líder canviant. Monos t’atrapa tot i tenir una trama inexistent. Entre la música atmosfèrica de Mica Levi, alguna cosa pren sentit, un pensament, un malson. És aquest el nostre futur? Ja hem vist soldats infantils abans a la gran pantalla, però 'Monos' no moralitza. Alguns dels personatges intenten escapar-se, però 'Monos' no va d’això. S’infiltra dins teu per crear una ansietat profunda que serà difícil de treure’s del damunt. Ha arribat l’hora d’allistar-se.

Aguas oscuras

Aguas oscuras

3 out of 5 stars

Després de veure el thriller legal 'Aguas oscuras' et costarà recordar-la. Voldràs agafar-te a alguna 'killer line' d’aquest film on Mark Ruffalo interpreta l’advocat Rob Bilott, que es va enfrontar al gegant químic contaminador DuPont. No arribarà, però barrinaràs: qui ha dirigit Aguas oscuras, conduint el guió cap a gastades discussions d’oficina i disputes matrimonials de clixé? Ha estat Todd Haynes, l’indie radical rere Velvet Goldmine, Lluny del cel i Carol? L’última revelació fa més mal, perquè Aguas oscuras sembla una versió més estúpida i literal d’un concepte que Haynes ja va explorar de forma brillant el 1995 a Safe. Ruffalo, buscant un matís de consternació gruixuda que s’acabarà agreujant (on és el tipus de Spotlight?), aprèn sobre vaques amb tumors. La seva esposa, Sarah (Anne Hathaway, desaprofitada), va ser advocada: explotarà com una mena de fusió Douglas Sirkiana? No. Tots odiem la destrucció ambiental; és valuós tenir pel·lícules al respecte i aquesta funciona prou bé, però deixem que les facin cineastes amb menys talent.

Aguas oscuras

Aguas oscuras

3 out of 5 stars

Después de ver el thriller legal 'Aguas oscuras' te costará recordarla. Querrás coger a alguna 'killer line' de este film donde Mark Ruffalo interpreta al abogado Rob Bilott, que se enfrentó al gigante químico contaminador DuPont. No llegará, pero te dará que pensar: ¿quién ha dirigido 'Aguas oscuras', conduciendo el guion hacia gastadas discusiones de oficina y disputas matrimoniales de cliché? ¿Ha sido Todd Haynes, el indie radical tras Velvet Goldmine, 'Lejos del cielo' y 'Carol'? La última revelación hace más daño, porque 'Aguas oscuras' parece una versión más estúpida y literal de un concepto que Haynes ya exploró de forma brillante en 1995 en 'Safe'. Ruffalo, buscando un matiz de consternación gruesa que acabará agravando, aprende sobre vacas con tumores. Su esposa, Sarah (Anne Hathaway, desaprovechada), fue abogada: ¿explotará como una especie de fusión del cine de Douglas Sirk? No. Todos odiamos la destrucción ambiental; es valioso tener películas al respecto y esta funciona bastante bien, pero dejamos que las hagan cineastas con menos talento.

Queen & Slim

Queen & Slim

3 out of 5 stars

From ‘True Romance’ to ‘Badlands’, criminal lovers on the run have found safe haven on movie screens. Now Melina Matsoukas – a visually gifted filmmaker best known for Beyoncé’s ‘Formation’ video – adds to the canon with this atmospheric, impressively serious debut drama. Playing characters that are unnamed throughout the movie, Jodie Turner-Smith and Daniel Kaluuya find themselves pulled over, post-first date, by a virulently racist cop. One struggle over a gun later and they’re on the lam, uncertain of what to do. Investing their roles with thoughtfulness, both leads do fine work, even when the situation pushes them toward bad decisions or stereotypes (in one inspired costume choice, the outlaws don trashy clothes provided by a relative – a track suit and a miniskirt). A socially angry film, ‘Queen & Slim’ strikes intentional resonances with the 2014 racial unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, and elsewhere, making no apology for its antiheroes’ behaviour. It’s an invigorating stance. But for every ‘Thelma & Louise’-like magic-hour drive into the sunset (and there are several too many), you wish the movie also had the sophistication to nick from that classic script’s complex sense of injustice – one that had room for a subplot involving a sympathetic lawman. Believe in Matsoukas, though: she’s the real deal.

A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood

A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood

3 out of 5 stars

Fred Rogers captivated generations of America’s kids with his TV show ‘Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood’. He didn’t sugar-coat things, coaxing his young viewers through even the tough stuff like Vietnam and civil rights. Imagine Andi Peters presenting ‘Newsnight’ using animal puppets as props, and you’ll get the idea. Unfortunately, ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’ can’t quite match up the easy charms of the cheap-and-cheerful TV programme itself. There’s no impulse to explore the complexity of this strangest of celebrities – a gifted listener and child whisperer who calmed adults just as effectively. Tom Hanks, in his twinkly-eyed wheelhouse as Rogers, is a winning presence in a supporting role, while Esquire writer Lloyd Vogel (Matthew Rhys) becomes the movie’s surrogate kid. He’s swamped by a toxic relationship with his estranged dad that’s distracting him from his big interview with Rogers. You can easily predict what follows. It may be that successful real-life journo Tom Junod, on whom the Lloyd character is based, lacks real drama. And a bolder movie would have included Rogers’s late-career triumph, when he turned post-9/11 anxieties into a teachable moment. ‘Anything mentionable is manageable,’ Hanks offers in the film’s wisest words. It’s good advice, though the emotions here could have done with being a bit wilder. 

Queen & Slim

Queen & Slim

3 out of 5 stars

Els amants criminals a la fuga sempre han trobat refugi a les pantalles de cinema nord-americanes, un subgènere on directors tan diversos com Arthur Penn, Steven Spielberg i Terrence Malick s’han fet camí. Ara, Melina Matsoukas, coneguda pel videoclip 'Formation' de Beyoncé, passa a formar part del grup amb aquest impressionant debut, que només falla per algunes petites eleccions de trama una mica ridícules. Jodie Turner-Smith i Daniel Kaluuya –de 'Déjame salir'– interpreten dos personatges sense nom que són detinguts per un policia racista en la seva primera cita. Després d’un tiroteig es troben fugint de la ciutat sense saber què fer. Els protagonistes fan un treball exquisit, inclús quan les circumstàncies els fan prendre decisions errònies o caure en estereotips. Amb un gran component de denúncia social, 'Queen & Slim' té ressonàncies dels disturbis racials que hi va haver el 2014 a Ferguson, Missouri, i a altres llocs, i no demana perdó pel comportament dels seus antiherois, una postura molt estimulant. Però en els moments d’estil 'Thelma i Louise' conduint cap a la posta de sol (n’hi ha massa), desitges que la pel·lícula hagués tingut la sofisticació necessària per abordar la complexa injustícia que retrata aquest guió clàssic, cosa que hauria pogut donar lloc a una trama secundària on s’involucrés un advocat. No obstant això, crec en Matsoukas: ella és la que val aquí i sabrà com portar-nos millors coses.

Queen & Slim

Queen & Slim

3 out of 5 stars

Los amantes criminales a la fuga siempre han encontrado refugio en las pantallas de cine estadounidenses, un subgénero donde directores tan diversos como Arthur Penn, Steven Spielberg y Terrence Malick se han hecho camino. Ahora, Melina Matsoukas, conocida por el videoclip 'Formation' de Beyoncé, pasa a formar parte del grupo con este impresionante debut, que solo falla por algunas pequeñas elecciones de trama un poco ridículas. Jodie Turner-Smith y Daniel Kaluuya –de 'Déjame salir'– interpretan a dos personajes sin nombre que son detenidos por un policía racista en su primera cita. Tras un tiroteo se encuentran huyendo de la ciudad sin saber qué hacer. Los protagonistas hacen un trabajo exquisito, incluso cuando las circunstancias les hacen tomar decisiones erróneas o caer en estereotipos. Con un gran componente de denuncia social, 'Queen & Slim' tiene resonancias de los disturbios raciales que hubo en 2014 en Ferguson, Missouri, y en otros lugares, y no pide perdón por el comportamiento de sus antihéroes, una postura muy estimulante. Pero, en los momentos de estilo 'Thelma y Louise' conduciendo hacia la puesta de sol (hay demasiados), desearías que la película hubiera tenido la sofisticación necesaria para abordar la compleja injusticia que retrata este guion clásico, lo que pudo dar lugar a una trama secundaria donde se involucrara un abogado. Sin embargo, creo en Matsoukas: ella es la que vale aquí y sabrá cómo traernos mejores cosas.

Waves

Waves

4 out of 5 stars

It’s taken him three films, but over the course of those indies, writer-director Trey Edward Shults has ruined Thanksgiving (2015’s excruciating domestic psychodrama ‘Krisha’) and spoiled the world with plague (the majestically paranoid ‘It Comes at Night’). Now, with ‘Waves’, he obliterates a hardworking Florida family before delivering some nearly cosmic forgiveness in the movie’s second half. All of his films feel like personal exorcisms – Shults may best be described as a non-supernatural-horror director – but this one is a true breakthrough. Shults has a signature shot in which his camera rotates like the searching eye of a lighthouse, and ‘Waves’ exploits it beautifully. It’s how we meet the black high school wrestler Tyler (Kelvin Harrison Jr, impressively precise on his character’s steep decline), cruising in the car with his girlfriend. Shults takes in the happy moment with his swirling camera: Tyler swaddled in his middle-class comforts, with their attendant crush of expectations. Over the coming weeks, several bad things will happen to Tyler, a few of which are made infinitely worse by his own impulsive actions and confusion. ‘Waves’ turns this descent into an extended run of Job-worthy misfortune. ‘We are not afforded the luxury of being average,’ says Tyler’s father (Sterling K Brown, taut with concern), but apart from that line, ‘Waves’ doesn’t play like a statement on race so much as an indictment of the Kanye-scored, dumped-via-text pressure cooker that is bei

Las olas

Las olas

4 out of 5 stars

Lleva tres películas y en el transcurso de estas cintas indies, el guionista y director Trey Edward Shults ya ha arruinado el Día de Acción de Gracias en el insoportable psicodrama Krisha (2015) y ha echado a perder al mundo con una plaga en la majestuosa Viene de noche (2017). Ahora, con Las olas destruye a una familia trabajadora de Florida antes de una absolución casi cósmica. Todos sus filmes se sienten como exorcismos personales (Shults puede describirse como un director de terror no sobrenatural), pero su nueva película es un verdadero avance. Nunca se relaja después de su angustiosa primera hora; cuanto más transcurre, más humana se siente. Aquí conocemos a Tyler (Kelvin Harrison Jr., impresionantemente preciso con el fuerte declive de su personaje), inmerso en las comodidades de clase media, pero en las próximas semanas, varias cosas malas le sucederán, algunas de las cuales empeorarán infi nitamente por sus propias acciones y confusión. Esta cinta convierte este descenso en una larga racha de desgracias. Las olas, como todas sus películas, trata sobre la familia, pero esta vez no es un retrato de asfixia. La evolución artística que experimenta Shults lo hace tan emocionante como cualquier otro director que trabaje actualmente, es tan agudo como un joven Darren Aronofsky y su corazón solo está creciendo más. 

Jojo Rabbit

Jojo Rabbit

4 out of 5 stars

En resumen: el tipo que dirigió 'Thor: Ragnarok', el neozelandés Taika Waititi, ha hecho una película sobre un adorable joven hitleriano que tiene como amigo imaginario a Adolf Hitler (Waititi). Es una buena noticia: ya ha llegado el momento de repensar este cineasta de arriba a abajo. 'Jojo Rabbit' tiene la perspectiva de un niño ingenuo y solitario de 10 años, Jojo (Roman Griffin Davis), el "mejor y más leal pequeño nazi que he visto nunca", como dice el Hitler de Waititi con voz de dibujos animados. Para reír con la película, tendréis que abrazar este montaje intencionalmente inmaduro, que nos muestra un Jojo frenético que corre por la calle a ritmo de la versión alemana de 'I want to hold your hand' de los Beatles. En caso contrario, los anacronismos serán duros de tragar. ¿Deberíamos reír de todo esto? Muy raramente 'Jojo Rabbit' nos dice que no (a diferencia, por ejemplo, de la hipócrita 'La vida es bella'). En una secuencia como de casa encantada, Jojo descubre una adolescente judía, Elsa (la extraordinaria Thomasa McKenzie), que vive en el interior de las paredes de su casa, una niña abandonada secretamente protegida por su alegre madre soltera (Scarlett Johansson). Todo lo que Jojo tiene en mente sobre los judíos son ideas ridículas y Elsa solo le anima: "Es evidente que somos demonios que amamos el dinero", confirma. No es necesario saber que Waititi es medio judío, su confianza eleva la película por encima del antisemitismo. De alguna manera, imperceptiblemente, co

Karanlık Sular

Karanlık Sular

3 out of 5 stars

Yönetmen: Todd Haynes Nedir? Bir avukatın çevresel yıkıma karşı verdiği savaş. Neden izlemeli? Her şeye rağmen dikkate değer olan konusu için. ‘Dark Waters’ı izledikten birkaç saat sonra filmin ismini hatırlamakta zorlanacaksınız. Veya filmde Rob Bilott adlı bir karakteri canlandıran Mark Ruffalo’dan tek bir replik hatırlamayı deneyeceksiniz, ama boşuna. Aklınıza hiçbir şey gelmeyecek, çünkü zaten en başından beri filmde böyle bir replik yok. En kötüsü de, şu sorunun zihninizde dolanıp durması olacak: Beyaz ışıklarla aydınlatılmış ofislerde geçen, klişe dövüş sahneleriyle dolu bu filmin yönetmeni kim? Gerçekten ‘Velvet Goldmine’ (1998), ‘Far from Heaven / Cennetten Çok Uzakta’ (2002) ve ‘Carol’ (2015) gibi kural yıkıcı bağımsız filmlere imza atmış Todd Haynes olabilir mi filmi yöneten? Şunu fark etmek ise en acısı: ‘Dark Waters’, Haynes’in 1995 yapımı ‘Safe / Güvenli’de gayet başarıyla irdelediği bir konuyu tekrar ele alıyor. Ancak film ‘Safe’in kötü bir versiyonu olmaktan öteye gidemiyor. Ruffalo’nun karakteri filmde, ineklerde bazı tümörlerin çıktığını ve çocukların dişlerinin siyaha döndüğünü öğreniyor. Tabii ki hepimiz sinsice ilerleyen çevresel yıkımın farkındayız ve bu konuyu ele alan filmlerin olması değerli bir şey. Ancak bu düzeyde bir filmi Todd Haynes’e yakıştıramadık doğrusu.

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

3 out of 5 stars

‘Never underestimate a droid,’ we hear several times in the new ‘Star Wars’ – and why would you? For the most part, droids are hard-headed, sturdy companions, opening doors at the last minute with a minimum of beepy fuss. Director JJ Abrams is like a droid. He revived this brand from his childhood memories, unarchiving it from his data banks and dutifully projecting it, just like Artoo does with Leia’s hologram in the 1977 original. Abrams’s ‘The Force Awakens’ (2015) was a pitch-perfect summoning of old magic: thrilling and nostalgic, even if the trick remained stubbornly unimaginative. But Rian Johnson’s follow-up, ‘The Last Jedi’ (2017), executive-produced by Abrams, was something else entirely, subversive and churning with dark emotions. The franchise didn’t deserve it. Now Abrams the droid is back, scurrying around to clean up those untidy messes that made things interesting for a parsec. ‘The Rise of Skywalker’ marks the return of a plodding dullness, the kind that George Lucas peddled with his second trilogy, laden with pointless plot curlicues, witless imperial intrigue and boring heroism. It feels like a massive retrenchment – privately, a rebellion seems to have been fought and lost – and only the most loyal fans will be happy about it. Right from the start, you feel the soft reboot: ghostly zombie destroyers rise up out of a planet’s dirt, not quite vanquished. Will this new First Order prevail? Scarfaced Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) tear-asses around in his TIE fighter,

News (253)

Here are this year's Oscar nominees, including Cynthia Erivo in Harriet

Here are this year's Oscar nominees, including Cynthia Erivo in Harriet

This morning in Los Angeles, nominees for the 92nd Academy Awards were announced. Some history was made: Scarlett Johansson received not one but two acting nominations—her first two ever—in separate categories (the last time that happened was in 2007 with Cate Blanchett). Also receiving two nominations was Cynthia Erivo for her galvanizing performance in Harriet, as well as for that film's original song. It's a good thing Erivo was a part of this morning's conversation, because apart from her, there wasn't a lot of diversity on display. Both Hustlers' Jennifer Lopez and The Farewell's Awkwafina failed to make the cut, despite huge support. Snubs are always in the eye of the beholder; I'd say omitting Apollo 11 for Best Documentary Feature feels like a mistake, and it's a crime not to have included Greta Gerwig for Best Director (Little Women did well elsewhere, including acting nominations for Florence Pugh and Saoirse Ronan—receiving her fourth nom at age 25). Regardless, it's thrilling to see Bong Joon-ho's Parasite earn several major nods, including Best Picture and Best Director. Elsewhere, Robert Eggers's black-and-white fantasia The Lighthouse was nominated for Best Cinematography, a happy surprise. We'll be watching for any Baumbach–Gerwig tensions. The Oscars air Sunday February 9 on ABC. Here's a complete list of this morning's nominees: Best PictureFord v FerrariThe IrishmanJojo RabbitJokerLittle WomenMarriage Story1917Once Upon a Time…in HollywoodParasite Best Dire

Explore the worlds of four Netflix movies, including The Irishman, at this free pop-up museum

Explore the worlds of four Netflix movies, including The Irishman, at this free pop-up museum

In an Oscar season crowded with contenders, Netflix has done a killer job of showing off its shiniest objects. Even as its post-awards plans for the Paris Theatre—recently saved from closure—remain uncertain, the streaming service is staking real-world territory elsewhere, as last seen with Netflix's Little Italy takeover for The Irishman. Now, beginning today, the public can view "The Netflix Film Experiences in Dolby," a free two-floor exhibit of costumes, script pages and video clips assembled over several rooms at Dolby SoHo (477 Broadway). The show is open to the public from 1–8pm Wednesdays through Sundays until January 26. What awaits film fans? Four movies are showcased and, to be honest, some rooms are more fun than others. Was Al Pacino's performance as hot-blooded Jimmy Hoffa in The Irishman not quite big enough for you? Attendees can immerse themselves in an installation where he's yelling at you from multiple screens. Ever wanted to get up close and personal with some papal outfits? Costumes from The Two Popes are on display. More excitingly to these eyes: There's a lower level fully pimped out with '70s-era finery from Dolemite Is My Name. You can't actually see the Eddie Murphy comedy in a single New York City cinema at the moment (apart from your own Netflix account) but paradoxically, this exhibit has created a temporary public space for the movie's supercharged energy. Finally, find the quiet nook where a loveseat will let you and your significant other watc

Here's a complete list of tonight's Golden Globe winners, including Joaquin Phoenix for Joker

Here's a complete list of tonight's Golden Globe winners, including Joaquin Phoenix for Joker

Movies like Sam Mendes's immersive WWI drama 1917 and performances like The Farewell's Awkwafina made surprise showings at tonight's Golden Globes—in some cases crucially, with Oscars balloting happening much earlier this year than usual. (Voting on nominations ends this Tuesday.) Some winners were widely predicted: The Hollywood Foreign Press Association, traditionally champions of bigness, honored Joaquin Phoenix in Joker and Renée Zellweger in Judy, two front-runners who totally transformed themselves. Meanwhile, it looks like Brad Pitt may go all the way for Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood. Quentin Tarantino's Manson-era L.A. fantasia shaped up as potentially more of a force than The Irishman, which got completely shut out. (On the TV front, we have no problem seeing Phoebe Waller-Bridge add to her shelf of awards for Fleabag.) Here's a complete list of winners: Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionChristopher Abbott, Catch-22Sacha Baron Cohen, The SpyWINNER: Russell Crowe, The Loudest VoiceJared Harris, ChernobylSam Rockwell, Fosse/Verdon Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionKaitlyn Dever, UnbelievableJoey King, The ActHelen Mirren, Catherine the GreatMerritt Wever, UnbelievableWINNER: Michelle Williams, Fosse/Verdon Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionCatch-22WINNER: ChernobylFosse/VerdonThe Loudest VoiceUnbelievable Best Performance by an Ac

Here are this year's Golden Globes nominees, including J.Lo for Hustlers

Here are this year's Golden Globes nominees, including J.Lo for Hustlers

Only moments ago, nominees for the 77th Golden Globes Awards were announced. Awards prognosticators got a few surprises: Cate Blanchett scored a nod for the little-seen Where’d You Go, Bernadette; Joker's Todd Phillips beat out Marriage Story's Noah Baumbach for a directing nomination; and Cats scored for its original song (which we hated). But the Oscar picture is beginning to take shape. Awkwafina is looking like a lock for The Farewell, which thrills us, as is Antonio Banderas for Pain and Glory (a winner with the New York and Los Angeles critics groups). Meanwhile, the television nominations were appropriately Fleabag-heavy, which is all we care about. The Globes will be broadcast January 5, 2020 on NBC beginning at 6pm ET. Here's the complete list: Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionChristopher Abbott, Catch-22Sacha Baron Cohen, The SpyRussell Crowe, The Loudest VoiceJared Harris, ChernobylSam Rockwell, Fosse/Verdon Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionKaitlyn Dever, UnbelievableJoey King, The ActHelen Mirren, Catherine the GreatMerritt Wever, UnbelievableMichelle Williams, Fosse/Verdon Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionCatch-22ChernobylFosse/VerdonThe Loudest VoiceUnbelievable Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionPatricia Arquette, The ActHelena Bonham Carte

The Strokes announced a new album at their Barclays New Year's Eve show

The Strokes announced a new album at their Barclays New Year's Eve show

Unveiling a new song, a new album and some of the old woozy indiscipline that hamstrung their ascent nearly 20 years ago, the Strokes extended the most leisurely paced comeback in rock, delighting their hometown fans at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center last night. The chiming, seesawing, faintly sad “Ode to the Mets” arrived after a lengthy band conference, several of which plagued the show (ever hear of a set list, guys?). The new song didn’t sound like a galvanizing rebound so much as a grandly emotional closer: a future final-dance prom request. Maybe it will be placed near the end of the forthcoming 2020 release that frontman-songwriter Julian Casablancas teased as “coming out soon.” He offered no further details, adding, “The 2010s, whatever the fuck they’re called, we took them off, but now we’ve been unfrozen and we’re back.” The band still sounds like a paradox: coiled guitar riffs and spring-loaded bass lines under a tinny, debauched drunk dial. When the band used its New Year’s Eve gig (a makeup show after June’s rained-out Governors Ball) as a delivery device for multiple tracks off 2001’s classic Is This It, the crowd exploded. There’s simply no improving on songs like “The Modern Age,” “Hard to Explain,” “Last Nite,” “Barely Legal” and the post-9/11 controversial “New York City Cops,” the latter receiving its own red-and-blue police light show during the choruses. Things came to a halt during the ball drop, the broadcast piped through on the monitors like a glitzy tran

We asked Saoirse Ronan, Antonio Banderas and others to pick their favorite films of the 2010s

We asked Saoirse Ronan, Antonio Banderas and others to pick their favorite films of the 2010s

As the decade comes to a close, we’re in a reflective mood (remember Avatar?—yeah, us neither). The result is a list: the 50 best movies of the 2010s, which will no doubt come in handy next time you’re browsing your streaming service of choice. Returning to these films was enormously fun. Ranking them? Not so much. But we did it. Along the way, we asked some of our favorite directors and actors for their picks from the 2010s. Here’s what they told us: Cold War, as picked by Benedict Cumberbatch:“It was such a sad and achingly honest story of love and how destructive and tragic it can be. It was beautifully shot and used all the power of cinema in its framing and acting without words—and when the words came, they were arresting and surprising and dangerous and unexpected. It's painfully romantic, as well as being painful. It's really truly great cinematic storytelling. I was completely immersed in that world and that relationship. Pawel Pawlikowski is an incredible filmmaker.” The Death of Stalin and Get Out, as picked by Taika Waititi, director of Jojo Rabbit:“I really loved The Death of Stalin because it was smart. Also, I loved the decision to let the actors use their normal accents, because it didn’t make any difference to me. I was still shocked and I still found it fascinating and enthralling. The other film I really loved was Get Out, which was the only film in my entire life that I’ve actually yelled the title of the film at the film: ‘Get out!’ ” The Tree of Life, as

The best holiday screenings playing in NYC through the end of December

The best holiday screenings playing in NYC through the end of December

We won't lie: Generally, we like to watch holiday movies at home, preferably armed with egg nogs, hot toddies, cocoa, blankets or any convenient warm body (pets will do). But sometimes, other people are just what the doctor ordered when you're getting pounded by relentless Christmas cheer. Here's a list of the very best holiday screenings on offer in NYC theaters over the next several weeks. Note: We said "very best," which makes our list both naughty and nice. These shows should sell out fast, so buy your tickets now. Black ChristmasJoin the horror cognoscenti and bow to Bob Clark’s atmospheric sorority-house stalker—a huge influence on John Carpenter’s Halloween and other “the call is coming from inside the house” thrillers, but nowhere near as well known. It’s getting a new remake (the second one in 13 years), but begin here.Alamo Drafthouse, Downtown Brooklyn (drafthouse.com). Tue 17 at 9:30pm; $12. CarolOur favorite new Christmas classic returns to the Metrograph in 35mm. Working for the first time with material developed by another screenwriter, director Todd Haynes transforms an underappreciated 1952 Patricia Highsmith novel about secret lesbian love into a universal romance. Once you’ve seen Rooney Mara in a Santa hat, there’s no turning back.Metrograph, Lower East Side (metrograph.com). Fri 20 at 5:45pm, Sat 21 at 1:45pm; $15. Christmas with Louis ArmstrongSure to be magical, this bespoke 90-minute compilation—made exclusively for Film Forum—gathers Satchmo’s many mo

Fleabag and Olivia Colman snare Golden Globes nominations

Fleabag and Olivia Colman snare Golden Globes nominations

Only moments ago, nominees for the 77th Golden Globes Awards were announced. Awards prognosticators got a few surprises: Cate Blanchett scored a nod for the little-seen ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’; ‘Joker’ director Todd Phillips beat out ‘Marriage Story’ helmer Noah Baumbach for a directing nomination; and ‘Cats’ scored for its original song by Taylor Swift (which we hated). There are also no less than 27 Brits up for awards, including Daniel Craig, Taron Egerton and the aforementioned Andrew Scott and Olivia Colman. And the Oscar picture is beginning to take shape, too. Awkwafina is looking like a lock for ‘The Farewell’, which thrills us, as is Antonio Banderas for ‘Pain and Glory’ (a winner with the New York and Los Angeles critics’ groups). Meanwhile, the television nominations were appropriately ‘Fleabag’-heavy, which is all we care about.Surprisingly, no female directors have been nominated despite a year that saw Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’, Céline Sciamma’s ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’, Lulu Wang’s ‘The Farewell’ and Lorene Scafaria’s ‘Hustlers’. The Golden Globes take place on January 5, 2020. And Ricky Gervais is back on hosting duties after a four-year cooling off period since the last time he did it. This could be fun. Here’s the complete list of nominees: Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for TelevisionChristopher Abbott, Catch-22Sacha Baron Cohen, The SpyRussell Crowe, The Loudest VoiceJared Harris, ChernobylSam Rockwell,

Netflix is de-aging Little Italy to 1975 this weekend in honor of The Irishman

Netflix is de-aging Little Italy to 1975 this weekend in honor of The Irishman

You've read Martin Scorsese's take on Marvel movies. You've argued about it. You've even watched the Cats trailer (maybe a few times, in stupefied silence). But have you seen The Irishman yet? Come on, people. Not only do we recommend it, but we know that three-and-a-half hours isn't a big deal to you, say when it comes to committing to The Crown or whatever. It's Marty and you're a New Yorker. Consider it homework. Today, Netflix released a new trailer for The Irishman and it's extremely well-done, glancing on much of the complexity of the film: the violence, guilt and recrimination of mob life. Here it is: But nothing will bring you into the universe better than what Netflix has planned this weekend for Little Italy. On Friday and Saturday from 9am to 7pm, the streaming service will be taking over five blocks of the neighborhood and back-dating them to August 1, 1975, the day after Jimmy Hoffa was reported missing. Here's what Netflix has released about it: Courtesy of Netflix What does this mean for you? It means you're going to encounter surprises, old cars, newspapers, maybe even some gangster dramatics. If you "tell 'em Jimmy sent you" (that's the secret catchphrase), you'll be able to collect free food and drinks from some of the tastiest restaurants in the area, like Parm and Ferrara Bakery & Cafe. Here's a map of the participating shops: Courtesy of Netflix And Netflix will no doubt make sure that everyone leaves with a bit of swag from the movie itself, just as

Beginning this weekend, Noah Baumbach is taking over Metrograph, programming his own films and favorites

Beginning this weekend, Noah Baumbach is taking over Metrograph, programming his own films and favorites

Is it any surprise that director Noah Baumbach—whose new movie, Marriage Story, is a bruising tour de force and opens today—loves our favorite LES theater, the bespoke Metrograph? “Although the Metrograph is only three years old, it feels already like a New York institution,” writes the director in program notes detailing his upcoming six-week residency at the movie house beginning this Friday. During that span, all of Baumbach’s narrative features will be screened (but not his insightful 2015 documentary profile, De Palma—what gives, Metrograph? It can still be added…). Some of these presentations will either be introduced by the filmmaker or followed by Q&As, turning his residency into a de facto master class.  Intriguingly, Baumbach has also picked several “companion” films (in his words, “movies that I love, that have somehow informed my work as well as my life”) to play as double features: Éric Rohmer’s Pauline at the Beach after Margot at the Wedding; the generationally-themed Working Girl after While We’re Young; other choices that are too good to ruin. He's even found room for E.T. The takeaway is a nuanced appreciation of a particular artist’s sensibility, one steeped in encyclopedic Gen-X scholarship but with room for detours into beloved mid-budget Hollywood movies and NYC-set indies. For many who have cherished Baumbach’s work for years, the residency will feel like a coronation. And for those who have yet to experience one of his films, it’s going to be a scene—e

Scorsese's new film The Irishman re-creates a notorious Little Italy seafood restaurant

Scorsese's new film The Irishman re-creates a notorious Little Italy seafood restaurant

We haven't seen anyone camping out on the street yet for tickets, but trust: Martin Scorsese's fans are palpitating in advance of this Friday's theatrical release of The Irishman. Beginning November 1 at these participating theaters only, the three-and-a-half-hour gangster epic (which we enjoyed) will play for crowds until Netflix begins streaming it Thanksgiving weekend, at which point all bets are off. Will the movie give you that Marty feeling? Yes. Will it remind you of Goodfellas or Mean Streets? Somewhat, but not always. A decades-spanning drama, The Irishman spends a fair amount of time in Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Florida. It's not as New York-centric as some of Scorsese's other films, like The King of Comedy or Taxi Driver. But one scene that is undeniably NYC is Scorsese's re-creation of the infamous 1972 mob hit on Joe Gallo at Umberto's Clam House, then located on the corner of Mulberry and Hester Streets. (After closing shop in the late '90s and reopening, Umberto's is now two blocks north.) During one night in November 2017, Scorsese aged a block on the Lower East Side, transforming it into the famous intersection. Here's a screen grab from the trailer that shows the scene in question: Elsewhere in the movie, Long Islanders will be able to catch Hildebrandt's, the beloved Williston Park ice cream shop. It figures prominently in a key scene in which the characters hear about the Kennedy assassination. Will any other Irishman locations become as famous

The beloved Paris Theater will reopen for a limited run of Netflix's Marriage Story

The beloved Paris Theater will reopen for a limited run of Netflix's Marriage Story

Looking to qualify its soon-to-be-streaming titles for Oscars, Netflix continues to successfully book alternative theatrical options: Two weeks ago came the news that Martin Scorsese's The Irishman would take residence at Broadway's Belasco Theatre. Now we're hearing that the Paris Theater—recently shuttered in August after more than seven decades (Marlene Dietrich cut the inaugural ribbon in 1948)—will reopen for a brief run of Noah Baumbach's five-star-excellent Marriage Story, beginning Wednesday, November 6. It remains unclear how long the Paris will stay open. Regardless, fans of the elegant single-screen theater—on the opposite side of 58th St. across from the Plaza Hotel—see this as a win. It may even be a better solution than the Belasco: At 581 seats, the Paris has roughly half the space, but it does have a romantic balcony and will be able to host multiple daily screenings to the Belasco's single showing. Moreover, it brings Baumbach's distinctly NYC vision to those who want to see it with a crowd. Insisting on tough terms when it comes box-office receipts, Netflix is finding it hard to strike deals with chains like AMC and Regal. But individual movie houses seem ready to engage: Here is a complete list of theaters where you can go see The Irishman. (We strongly prefer IFC Center's cushiony seats to the Belasco's butt-numbers, and the Scorsese is a full three-and-a-half hours without intermission.) Marriage Story, too, will have alternate options beyond the Paris—a

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