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NYC hotels: The best Manhattan hotels, from cheap to luxurious

Find the perfect place to lay your head in Manhattan with our guide to NYC hotels, from boutique and designer spots to luxurious stalwarts.

Manhattan still offers the most comprehensive range of NYC hotels. Growth areas include the Financial District, which is getting a new lease on life as the World Trade Center site's redevelopment nears completion. In summer 2010, upscale chain W Hotels debuted its flashy new property, which includes residences as well as a hotel, directly opposite the WTC, and stylish Hilton offshoot Conrad New York took up a riverside spot in Battery Park City in spring 2012.

RECOMMENDED: Complete guide to Manhattan

Hell's Kitchen is popular with a trend-seeking gay clientele—the city's first gay "urban resort," The Out NYC, opened in 2012—and anyone who wants to be near the Theater District. The British team behind capsule-hotel brand Yotel recently introduced a supersized variation on the concept in the neighborhood. Hip mini chain Ace Hotel colonized an area at the northern edge of the Flatiron District, which is emerging as a hotel (and restaurant) hot spot—the long-awaited NoMad Hotel, from the same developer, debuted in spring 2012 with a restaurant helmed by high-profile chef Daniel Humm. There is now more choice in boutique hotels in desirable areas like Nolita, Chelsea and Greenwich Village, with the arrival of the Nolitan, Hôtel Americano and the Jade Hotel, respectively.

NYC hotels in Manhattan by area

Times Square

Bed down in the heart of NYC with this guide to hotels near Times Square in New York. 414 Hotel This reasonably priced hotel truly deserves the boutique title. Nearly everything about it is exquisite yet unshowy, from its power-blasted brick exterior to the modern color scheme in the rooms that pairs gray headboards and red accents. Rooms are equipped with fridges, flat-screen TVs and iPod docks, the bathrooms are immaculate, and a working gas fireplace in the lobby is a welcoming touch. Twice as big as it looks, 414 consists of two townhouses separated by a leafy courtyard, which in warmer months is a lovely place to eat your complimentary breakfast of fresh croissants and bagels. The location in a residential yet central neighborhood makes it even more of a find. Rooms: 22. Dream Hotel Vikram Chatwal—the mastermind behind the color-themed Time and the Night hotel, inpired by "modern gothic Gotham"—turned the old Majestic Hotel into a luxury lodge with a trippy slumberland theme in 2004. The lobby, dominated by a two-story tubular fishtank and an enormous statue of Catherine the Great, sums up the surreal aesthetic. Rooms are more restrained, with ethereal blue lighting effects offsetting white minimalism, but scuffed furniture is showing its age. The hotel's popular Italian eatery, Serafina, has a Fellini-esque interior crafted by David Rockwell, and Ava, the rooftop bar, wows drinkers with its panoramic views of the city. The onsite Ayurvedic spa was conceived by none

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NYC hotels in Manhattan by neighborhood

Chelsea

Hotels in Chelsea run the style gamut from cool minimalism to luxurious opulence—and there's no shortage of new spots to spend a memorable night. Currently undergoing renovation, the bohemian landmark Chelsea Hotel (officially named Hotel Chelsea) will eventually reopen under the auspices of King & Grove, and boutique accommodations in the neighborhood have multiplied in recent years. Among the best hotels in Chelsea are hipster crash pad Ace Hotel, surreal party base Dream Downtown, the minimalist Hôtel Americano and the elegant NoMad Hotel.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chelsea, New York Ace Hotel Bourgeois hipsters tired of crashing on couches will appreciate the New York outpost of the cool chainlet founded in Seattle by a pair of DJs. The music influence is clear: Many of the rooms in the 1904 building boast playful amenities like functioning turntables, stacks of vinyl and gleaming Gibson guitars. And while you’ll pay for the sprawling loft spaces, there are options for those on a lower budget. The respectable "medium" rooms are outfitted with vintage furniture and original art; even cheaper are the snug bunk-bed setups. Should you find the latter lodging stifling, repair to the buzzing hotel lobby, where DJs or other music-makers are on duty every night; have a drink at the bar, sheltered within a paneled library salvaged from a Madison Avenue apartment, or sip coffee from the Stumptown café—the first in the city from the artisanal Oregon coffee roasters. Guests can also s

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West Village

The Jane Opened in 1907 as the American Seaman’s Friend Society Sailors Home, the 14-story landmark was a residential hotel when hoteliers Eric Goode and Sean MacPherson, of the Bowery and the Maritime, took it over (some long-term residents remain). The wood-paneled, 50-square-foot rooms were inspired by vintage train sleeper compartments—there’s a single bed with built-in storage and brass hooks for hanging up your clothes, but also iPod docks and wall-mounted 23-inch flat-screen TVs. If entering the hotel feels like stepping on to a film set, there’s good reason: Inspiration came from various celluloid sources, including Barton Fink’s Hotel Earle for the lobby. The "ballroom," decorated with mismatched chairs, oriental rugs and a fireplace topped with a stuffed ram, evokes an eccentric mansion. Rooms: 208. Abingdon Guest House A charming option in a charming neighborhood: Rooms in the Abingdon’s two converted town houses are done up in plush fabrics and antique furnishings and sport homespun details like original 1950s pine floors, hooked rugs, and four-poster or sleigh beds. Although all have private baths, they may not be inside the room. The Ambassador has a kitchenette, while the Garden Room has a small private courtyard. Rooms: 9.

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Lower East Side

Hotel on Rivington When the Hotel on Rivington opened in 2005, its ultra-modern, glass-covered façade was a novelty on the largely low-rise Lower East Side. Now, with condos popping up on nearly every block, the building (designed by NYC firm Grzywinski+Pons) seems less out of place, but it remains one of the few luxury hotels in the neighborhood. Rooms are super-sleek, with oh-so-hip black-and-white decorative touches, like velvet-covered lounge chairs, and floor-to-ceiling windows that offer views of Manhattan and beyond (even in the shower stalls). A stylish crowd congregates in the hotel’s two new restaurants, Coop Food & Drink, which serves sushi alongside modern American fare, and Viktor & Spoils, a contemporary taqueria and tequila bar. Rooms: 110.

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Little Italy and Nolita

Find the best hotels in the locale, whether you’re on a tight budget or looking to splurge on a more luxurious stay. Nolita hasn’t been known for accommodations, but recent hotel openings mean you can spend the night in the stylish enclave, which is also a convenient base for exploring Soho and the Lower East Side. Here’s the lowdown on the best hotels in the area.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Little Italy and Nolita The Bowery House Two young real-estate developers have transformed a 1927 Bowery flophouse into a stylish take on a hostel. History buffs will get a kick out of the original wainscotted corridors leading to cubicles (singles are a cozy 35 square feet, and not all have windows) with latticework ceilings to allow air circulation. It might not be the best bet for light sleepers, but the place is hopping with pretty young things attracted to the hip aesthetic and the location (across the street from the New Museum and close to Soho and the Lower East Side). Quarters are decorated with vintage prints and historical photographs, and illluminated by lightbulbs encased in 1930s and ’40s mason jars; towels and robes are courtesy of Ralph Lauren. The immaculate (gender-segregated) communal bathrooms have rain showerheads and products from local spa Red Flower, while the guest lounge is outfitted with chesterfield sofas, chandeliers, a huge LCD TV and an assortment of international style mags. There’s a 1,800-square-foot roof terrace, and a ground-floor restaurant is in the wo

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