Cannes Film Festival 2015

We offer daily reviews of the latest buzzed-about movies and directors from Cannes Film Festival 2015

© Andrea Raffin

It’s that time of year: the lineup for the Cannes Film Festival (May 13–24)—the most exciting event on the film calendar—will be announced April 16th. Below, we'll be updating you with details on all 18 films competing for the Palme d’Or, world cinema’s top prize, which was won in the past by the likes of Martin Scorsese (Taxi Driver), David Lynch (Wild at Heart), Roman Polanski (The Pianist) and Michael Haneke (Amour). Time Out will be reporting on the festival from beginning to end, so for news and reviews keep coming back over the next few weeks. Salut!

When is Cannes Film Festival?

The 68th annual Cannes Film Festival will take place from May 13–24, 2015.     

Where is Cannes Film Festival?    

The Cannes Film Festival will take place in Cannes, France at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès.

Cannes Film Festival 2015

Movies

Ten things we’ve learned so far at the Cannes Film Festival

Cannes has now passed the halfway point. Here’s what we've discovered along the way

Read more
Movies

Review: Carol

With Carol, director Todd Haynes returns us to a place similar to the repressed 1950s East Coast universe that he explored in his 2002 film Far from Heaven. It's historically not long past, but this is an emotionally oh-so-distant world, recreated here with exquisite craft, where the big city offers a tiny slither of hope to those suffocating in the stultifyingly conservative suburbs. This is the story of two women, Carol (Cate Blanchett, staggering) and Therese (Rooney Mara, equally so), strangers who meet on either side of a Manhattan department-store counter and must choose to face or ignore their feelings for each other as Haynes examines gay desire and repression. Of course, nobody says the words gay or lesbian in Carol, adapted by Phyllis Nagy from a little-known 1952 Patricia Highsmith novel, The Price of Salt. In fact, no one talks much at all, so hard is it for our main characters to say what they’re thinking—or to even know what they’re thinking. Head-turning in a glamorous fur coat (Sandy Powell's costumes are a dream), Carol is a suburban wife and mother going through a divorce and, we later learn, on the verge of ostracism by her family and friends because of her past relationship with a woman. Carol is Christmas shopping when she spots twentysomething Therese, a store worker and aspiring photographer who won't commit to a keen male suitor. The attraction between the two women is immediate and mutual, initially haltingly expressed via the few seconds of a trans

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Review: Inside Out

It's all in the mind in Pixar's latest, a delightful, frenetic, near-experimental animated film from the makers of Up and Toy Story. Pixar fans will be in seventh heaven with the film's bold thinking—and kids will be straining to listen to imaginary voices in their heads—after diving into the mind of Riley, an 11-year-old girl whose tiny world is turned upside down when she moves from Minnesota to San Francisco with her mom and dad. It's a simple story, featuring a new school and nervous parents. But the real drama goes on in Riley's head, where we meet Joy (Amy Poehler), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith), each of them sharing a physicality to match their temperament. Disgust gives great sneer while Anger is red, squat and prone to shooting fire out of his head. We watch each of them fight for control over Riley's life, and when Joy and Sadness go AWOL from their psychological HQ we take a tour of some crazy mental byways, including the Abstract Thinking Department, where Joy and Sadness briefly become 2-D characters and then, momentarily, one-color squiggles. There's too much to sponge up in one viewing. Blink and you'll miss a character saying "These facts and opinions look so similar" when passing boxes marked "Facts" and "Opinions." We leave the subconscious ("where they take all the troublemakers") too quickly and then it's on to the Dream Department, where we see the day's memories being adapted into drama. At t

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Review: Irrational Man

Not since 2007’s Cassandra’s Dream has Woody Allen played it almost entirely deadly straight with a tragic male character at the heart of a drama. Irrational Man harks further back to the likes of Crimes and Misdemeanors and gives us Abe (Joaquin Phoenix), a philosophy lecturer who arrives to teach at a small East Coast college. He's preceded by a reputation for eccentricity and womanizing—it turns out he’s depressed and impotent, too. Two women circle him: fellow professor Rita (Parker Posey), who wants to sleep with him, and student Jill (Emma Stone), who insists, weakly, that her interest in this dark cloud of man is purely platonic. Abe feels useless and directionless. It’s only when, unknown to anyone else, he hatches a plot to commit the perfect crime that he starts to come alive, intellectualizing his way to murder, and only then does the jazz properly kick in on the soundtrack. It all feels pretty familiar: the tortured genius, the younger woman, the plot taking a suffocating turn, murder as an existential debate, the world increasingly closing in on our antihero. But there’s something sloppy and sluggish about Irrational Man, even by Allen’s uneven standards. It is by no means a disgraceful film—at times it feels respectable and uncomplicated—and there’s enough for Allen aficionados to enjoy and unpack. But the energy levels are low, not helped in the early stages by the film being anchored by Phoenix’s mumbling, laconic mess. Luckily, Stone is a reliably lively pr

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Review: The Sea of Trees

Whatever variety of trees grow in Japan's infamous Aokigahara—otherwise known as the Suicide Forest—Gus Van Sant's lethally tedious new film makes this much clear: They're dangerously full of sap. Van Sant has long exhibited a curiously split directorial personality, producing one dripping barrel of schmaltz like Restless for every Elephant-style study in austere severity. Still, he may never have made a film quite as banal as this life-after-near-death drama, which resembles one of Japanese auteur Naomi Kawase's spiritualist tone poems brutally hijacked in the editing suite by M. Night Shyamalan. For leading man Matthew McConaughey, it's an inexplicable passion project that, if the length and soggy-eyed earnestness of his multiple monologues are anything to go by, he presumably imagined would reap him further Oscar glory. Things get off to a bad start from the very beginning, when precious seconds of screen time are spent on McConaughey's doleful science professor checking in at the airport. The flight attendant can't find his booking. Her manager is called. Wait, there it is! It was a technical error. If this much story padding is required at the outset, things hardly tighten up when McConaughey arrives at Aokigahara, intent on killing himself for reasons that are gruellingly revealed in sporadic flashbacks to his broken marriage to mopey, tumor-afflicted Naomi Watts. Were the story being told in linear order, some tension would arise from the question of which of these m

Time Out says
  • 1 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Review: Tale of Tales

There was already something wonderfully weird and carnivalesque about Matteo Garrone's past films about the Naples mafiosi (Gomorrah) and our modern yearning for celebrity (Reality). Now, the Italian director has let his circus ringmaster's instinct flower with the bold Tale of Tales, a patchwork of three fantastical stories adapted from the fairy tales of 17th-century Neapolitan writer Giambattista Basile. Ogres, giant fleas, albino twins, an old woman flaying her skin in search of youth and a queen feasting on the heart of a sea monster: The sheer, obstinate oddness of Tale of Tales sends crowd-pleasers like Game of Thrones and The Hobbit scuttling into the shadows in terror. This is not kids' stuff—it's scary, solemn and not just a little silly. Garrone presents these stories exactly as they come, by inviting us into their world rather than the other way around. What links these strange, seductive tales is a sly observation of the follies of power. One king (Toby Jones) breeds a flea and accidentally marries off his daughter (Bebe Cave) to a brute; another (Vincent Cassel) allows his rampant sexual desire to lead him into bed with an old crone (Hayley Carmichael); yet a third (John C. Reilly) dies after taking the advice of a mysterious old man on how to cure the inability of his wife (Salma Hayek) to have a child. The design, costumes, photography and effects all combine to create a medieval world that feels mythical but not overly so. The reverential tone and slow pac

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Review: Our Little Sister

Family, food, love, work, life and death are all on the menu in Our Little Sister. This irresistible, light-filled family drama from Japanese writer-director Hirokazu Kore-eda (I Wish, Still Walking) brims with small moments and goes down as easily as the many meals it shares with us. Kore-eda gives us three sisters, Sachi (Haruka Ayase), Yoshino (Masami Nagasawa) and Chika (the monomonikered Kaho), all in their twenties, who meet their teenage half-sister, Suzu (Suzu Hirose), for the first time at their estranged father's funeral in the countryside. Immediately getting on well with this balanced, smart young woman, they invite Suzu to share with them the old family home in Kamakura that their father abandoned 15 years earlier and where the three still live, eating, drinking and talking together like friends as much as siblings. Their close rapport and reliance on each other—and the dignity with which they welcome their new sister, despite her presence unearthing old resentments—is deeply infectious. Absence is a theme: The mother of the three older sisters, like their father, has been away for some years, too, and part of the power of Kore-eda's film rests on how he subtly tracks each of these four women's different perspectives on their parents. Those perspectives, in turn, continue to influence their attitudes to each other, their work and their relationships with men—although men firmly take a back seat in Our Little Sister. This is a sisterly drama through and through.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Review: Standing Tall

Catherine Deneuve, the grande dame of French cinema, is the calm center of this low-key social-realist drama about a teenage boy going wildly off the rails. A quiet but forceful presence, Deneuve plays a soon-to-retire judge on the juvenile circuit and an unlikely surrogate mother to Malony (Rod Paradot), a kid who appears in her office several times with escalating urgency over the course of a few years. Other members of Malony's unofficial extended family include his rough-necked counselor Yann (Benoît Magimel), as well as a handful of care-givers who come and go in his life with the same volatility as his mood swings. We first meet Malony at age six, when his poor and incapable mother (Sara Forestier, wearing distractingly bad fake teeth) abandons him to social care. We catch up with Malony nine years later as KRS-One's "Sound of Da Police" (the film's music choices aren't subtle) booms on the soundtrack and Malony joyrides in a stolen car. Once arrested, he finds himself on a downward spiral of judgments and punishments, and it becomes questionable whether he'll be able to avoid the fate that life has mapped for him—or if he even wants to. Writer-director Emmanuelle Bercot leads us through Mahony's downbeat story—from care to detention center to prison, via a potentially life-changing relationship—with calm efficiency, only occasionally tipping her film into melodrama or allowing events in Mahony's life to feel less convincing than they should. Certainly this same mater

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

The 10 most controversial Cannes winners

Boos, hisses, even howls of pain have greeted the announcements of the winning films, at a festival known for being vocal

Read more
Movies

15 movies we can’t wait to see at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival

Woody Allen, Pixar, Michael Fassbender and Cate Blanchett will all be making an appearance this year at the world’s most famous film festival

Read more

Cannes Film Festival 2014

Movies

The Captive

Dir: Atom Egoyan Ryan Reynolds stars as the father of an abducted child who, eight years after her kidnapping, believes she is still alive. Read more

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Foxcatcher

Dir: Bennett Miller The tragic true story of two Olympic wrestling champion brothers and their relationship with multi-millionaire John du Pont. Read more

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 1 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

Goodbye to Language

Dir: Jean-Luc Godard The New Wave titan has said this experimental 3D feature might very well be his last. Say it ain’t so! Read more

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Movies

The Homesman

Dir: Tommy Lee Jones Jones stars as George Briggs, who’s tasked with transporting three mentally ill women across the American subcontinent. Read more

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 1 out of 5 stars
Read more
Show more

Cannes Film Festival 2013

Movies

Heli, Young & Beautiful, The Bling Ring

Three early fest offerings explore the inflamed trials of youth.

Read more
Movies

A Touch of Sin, The Past, Stranger by the Lake

On Cannes' second day, our critic is intrigued and overwhelmed by three new features.

Read more
Movies

Like Father, Like Son and Jimmy P.: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian

New films from Hirokazu Kore-eda and Arnaud Desplechin jerk tears and explore the mind.

Read more
Movies

Inside Llewyn Davis

The Coen brothers helm a hilarious and melancholy ode to the '60s folk scene.

Read more
Show more

Cannes Film Festival 2012

Movies

Moonrise Kingdom, Rust and Bone

Wes Anderson and Jacques Audiard kick off the fest with high expectations.

Read more
Movies

Reality, Paradise: Love

Matteo Garrone and Ulrich Seidl take on a pair of hot topics: reality TV and cash-for-sex tourism.

Read more
Movies

No

Chile's Pablo Larrain delivers the fest's first all-out fave.

Read more
Movies

Love, Beyond the Hills, Lawless

Michael Haneke scores, while two other anticipated films miss their marks.

Read more
Show more

Cannes Film Festival 2011

Movies

Halftime report

Read more

Cannes Film Festival 2010

Age before beauty (so far)

Read more

We've seen Oliver Stone's Wall Street sequel!

Read more

Up in the air

Read more

Isn't it romantic?

Read more
Show more

Comments

0 comments