Best new restaurants: The 10 hottest eateries in NYC

Consult our always-up-to-date list of New York City's best new restaurants before planning your next night out.

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  • Photograph: Daniel Krieger

    Best new restaurants: The NoMad

  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Best new restaurants: Mission Chinese Food

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Best new restaurants: Blanca

  • Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

    Best new restaurants: Pok Pok Ny

  • Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

    Best new restaurants: Empellón Cocina

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Best new restaurants: The Cannibal

  • Photograph: Dominic Perri

    Best new restaurants: Perla

  • Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

    Best new restaurants: RedFarm

  • Photograph: Virginia Rollison

    Best new restaurants: Tertulia

  • Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

    Best new restaurants: Boulud Sud

Photograph: Daniel Krieger

Best new restaurants: The NoMad


The New York food landscape is a perilous place for cool-hunters. With new blockbuster venues opening each week it’s hard to keep track of the best new restaurants and the hottest tables in town. That’s why we’ve created this constantly updated list of the best new restaurants in New York. Come back early and often to get up to snuff on the chefs to watch, the reservations you need to score and the dishes you have to taste in New York City’s ever-evolving restaurant arena. Did we miss your favorite New York restaurant? Join the conversation in the comments.


Blanca

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 4/4

Chef Carlo Mirarchi and the team behind Roberta's moved his widely acclaimed tasting menu from their flagship restaurant to this sleek spot in the back garden. The white-washed digs here are minimal and modernist—a fitting setting for Mirarchi's artful composed dishes. The chef plays with

  1. 261 Moore St, (between Bogart and White Sts), 11206
More info

Mission Chinese Food

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Anthony Myint and Daniel Bowien shook up the San Francisco dining scene with Mission Chinese Food. The groundbreaking joint drew long lines on a dingy strip in the Mission and national acclaim for its eclectic Asian soul food. Bowien moved to New York to open this Lower East Side outpost,

  1. 154 Orchard St, (between Rivington and Stanton Sts)
More info

Pok Pok Ny

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Critics choice

Chef Andy Ricker gained national renown (and a James Beard Award) with a trio of quirky Thai eateries, serving lesser-known Southeast Asian specialties, in Portland, OR. He debuted his signature dishes in New York at takeout joint Pok Pok Wing first, and then at this full-service restaurant in

  1. 127 Columbia St, (between DeGraw and Kane Sts)
More info

The NoMad

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

The luxurious setting, flawless service, and preponderance of foie gras and truffles call to mind an haute cuisine titan. But with its fashionable crowd and cool, voluptuous vibe there are clearly some young Turks behind the wheel. Chef Daniel Humm and William Guidara, the celebrated team behind

  1. 1170 Broadway, (at 28th St)
Book online

Empellón Cocina

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Wd~50's talented pastry chef, Alex Stupak, shocked the food establishment when he abandoned avant-garde desserts to open a West Village taqueria. At this follow-up project, Stupak leaves behind tacos to delve further into Mexican regional cuisines with traditional and creative plates, like dry-aged

  1. 105 First Ave, (between 6th and 7th Sts)
Book online

The Cannibal

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

With its deli fridges stocked with ales and lagers and its aged steaks and whole hams dangling from steel hooks, the Cannibal is almost a parody of a manly restaurant. If you like artisanal meat and craft beer, though, restaurateur Christian Pappanicholas (Resto) has created something pretty close

  1. 113 E 29th St, (between Park Ave South and Lexington Aves), 10016
More info

Perla

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

For this West Village hit, restaurateur Gabriel Stulman (Joseph Leonard, Fedora) teamed up with chef Michael Toscano, a talented youngster who caught the eye of the food cognoscenti while running the kitchen at Mario Batali’s meat palace Manzo. The toque has wasted no time in embracing the

  1. 24 Minetta Ln, (between Sixth Ave and MacDougal St)
Book online

RedFarm

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Restaurateur Ed Schoenfeld and head chef Joe Ng (Chinatown Brasserie) offer a playful homage to the golden age of Chinese fine dining at this groundbreaking eatery. The farm-to-table decor makes an unconventional backdrop for a Chinese joint, and the eclectic menu is just as hard to pin down. You

  1. 529 Hudson St, (between Charles and W 10th Sts)
More info

Tertulia

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

At this easygoing taberna, chef Seamus Mullen (Boqueria) offers an idealized spin on old-fashioned Spanish fare, with rustic regional grub and hard cider on tap. Peer into the open kitchen and you’ll get an idea of what’s really at work here—the chef is flanked by a wood-burning grill on one

  1. 359 Sixth Ave, (between Washington Pl and W 4th St)
More info

Boulud Sud

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

At his most international restaurant yet, superchef Daniel Boulud highlights the new French cuisine of melting-pot cities like Marseille and Nice. With his executive chef, Aaron Chambers (Café Boulud), he casts a wide Mediterranean net—looking to Israel and Egypt, Turkey and Greece.

  1. 20 W 64th St, (between Broadway and Central Park West), 10023
Book online


Users say

3 comments
Anita
Anita

I don't agree with NoMad having a higher rating than Blanca. Blanca is damn near perfection; it may be a tad more expensive than NoMad but the food is delicious, the atmosphere is laid-back and quiet unlike the crowd at NoMad.

ddd
ddd

To me, Blanca was way better than NoMad.