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Best new restaurants: The 10 hottest eateries in NYC

Consult our always-up-to-date list of New York City's best new restaurants before planning your next night out.

1/10
Photograph: Daniel Krieger

Best new restaurants: The NoMad

2/10
Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

Best new restaurants: Mission Chinese Food

3/10
Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

Best new restaurants: Blanca

4/10
Photograph: Lizz Kuehl

Best new restaurants: Pok Pok Ny

5/10
Photograph: Jakob N. Layman

Best new restaurants: Empellón Cocina

6/10
Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

Best new restaurants: The Cannibal

7/10
Photograph: Dominic Perri

Best new restaurants: Perla

8/10
Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

Best new restaurants: RedFarm

9/10
Photograph: Virginia Rollison

Best new restaurants: Tertulia

10/10
Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz

Best new restaurants: Boulud Sud

The New York food landscape is a perilous place for cool-hunters. With new blockbuster venues opening each week it’s hard to keep track of the best new restaurants and the hottest tables in town. That’s why we’ve created this constantly updated list of the best new restaurants in New York. Come back early and often to get up to snuff on the chefs to watch, the reservations you need to score and the dishes you have to taste in New York City’s ever-evolving restaurant arena. Did we miss your favorite New York restaurant? Join the conversation in the comments.

Blanca

Chef Carlo Mirarchi and the team behind Roberta's moved his widely acclaimed tasting menu from their flagship restaurant to this sleek spot in the back garden. The white-washed digs here are minimal and modernist—a fitting setting for Mirarchi's artful composed dishes. The chef plays with order and pacing, fending off the fatigue of a long meal—dinner runs to three hours at least—by alternating between potent and mellow plates, back and forth between seafood and meat. There are pristine slivers of striped jack, with peppery chrysanthemum leaf, garganelli quills with braised goat ragù and later glistening slices of Wagyu beef paired with roasted hearts of palm and sweet-tart vincotto. The desserts follow in the same well-paced vein. A refreshment of strawberry soup with sorrel granita softens the palate, and then fudgy gianduja with a smooth cherry semifreddo amps it back up.

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Williamsburg

Mission Chinese Food

Critics' pick

Anthony Myint and Daniel Bowien shook up the San Francisco dining scene with Mission Chinese Food. The groundbreaking joint drew long lines on a dingy strip in the Mission and national acclaim for its eclectic Asian soul food. Bowien moved to New York to open this Lower East Side outpost, decorated with a hanging yellow dragon and plastic flowers in throwaway vases—a cheap but effective reminder that the emphasis here, as on the Left Coast, is on the food. Bowien’s cooking features intensely personal spins on a host of Szechuan and Chinese-American classics. His ma po tofu features pork shoulder slow-cooked for six hours under seaweed sheets to ramp up the umami, and new dimensions of tongue-numbing heat. Rather than the usual chicken, his kung pao comes with excellent house-smoked pastrami. And instead of drab stir-fried beef and broccoli, there are falling-apart slabs of fatty braised brisket with crisp Chinese broccoli and smoked oyster sauce. While many of these flavors are familiar to the growing legions of Szechuan food fans, they’ve never been delivered quite like this. A bonus for charitable types: Like the S.F. flagship, the New York location donates 75 cents from every main dish to a local charity.

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Lower East Side

Pok Pok Ny

Critics' pick

Chef Andy Ricker gained national renown (and a James Beard Award) with a trio of quirky Thai eateries, serving lesser-known Southeast Asian specialties, in Portland, OR. He debuted his signature dishes in New York at takeout joint Pok Pok Wing first, and then at this full-service restaurant in Red Hook. The spot replicates the indigenous dives of Chiang Mai where Ricker’s Thai food education began, with a tented dining room out back festooned with dangling plants, colorful oilcloths on the tables and secondhand seats. But what separates Pok Pok from other cultish Thai restaurants is the curatorial role of its minutiae-mad chef. Ricker highlights a host of surprisingly mild northern-Thai dishes, including a delicious sweet-and-sour Burmese-inflected pork curry—kaeng hung leh. His khao soi, the beloved meal-in-a-bowl from Chiang Mai—chicken noodle soup delicately spiced with yellow curry and topped with fried noodles for crunch—is accompanied here with raw shallots and pickled mustard greens. The drinks are as much cultural artifacts as everything else. Try a fruit-flavored drinking vinegar or a refreshing and potent kafae boraan—a brandy-spiked Thai iced coffee with sweetened condensed milk.

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Cobble Hill

The NoMad

Critics' pick

The luxurious setting, flawless service, and preponderance of foie gras and truffles call to mind an haute cuisine titan. But with its fashionable crowd and cool, voluptuous vibe there are clearly some young Turks behind the wheel. Chef Daniel Humm and William Guidara, the celebrated team behind Eleven Madison Park, turn the music up for their sophomore venture in the NoMad Hotel. Ditching EMP's tasting-menu-only format, Humm takes a more democratic approach with an à la carte menu of seasonal, French-inflected fare. The food, like the space, exudes unbuttoned decadence. A poached egg stars in one over-the-top starter, its barely contained yolk melting into a sweet, velvety soup of brown butter and Parmesan, with shaved white asparagus and toasted quinoa for crunch. And while there are plenty of rich-man roasted chickens for two in New York, the bird here—with a foie gras, brioche and black truffle stuffing under the skin—is surely the new gold standard. Try it with the sweet amber Le Poulet, a Brooklyn Brewery ale designed to be paired with the designer fowl.

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Midtown

Empellón Cocina

Critics' pick

Wd~50's talented pastry chef, Alex Stupak, shocked the food establishment when he abandoned avant-garde desserts to open a West Village taqueria. At this follow-up project, Stupak leaves behind tacos to delve further into Mexican regional cuisines with traditional and creative plates, like dry-aged New York strip steak with crema, black bean and salsa roja; mescal-cured ocean trout with cream cheese, roe and sal de gusanos (salt with chili and toasted maguey-plant worms); and ruby-red shrimp with sea-urchin mousse, crispy masa and lettuces. As at the West Village flagship, his wife, Lauren Resler (Babbo), heads up pastries and dispatches inspired South of the Border plates, including a chocolate cake with mole dulce, sesame-seed candy and masa ice cream, and sweet plantain shortcakes topped with cajeta (goat's-milk caramel) and crema. Brother-in-law Mathew Resler rounds out the family affair, presiding over the black-topped bar—where a whopping 70 tequilas, 40 mescals and one sotol (another distilled-agave spirit) line the shelves—and slinging boozy quaffs, like Sweep the Leg, made with Ilegal Joven, yellow chartreuse, sake and jackfruit.

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East Village

The Cannibal

Critics' pick

With its deli fridges stocked with ales and lagers and its aged steaks and whole hams dangling from steel hooks, the Cannibal is almost a parody of a manly restaurant. If you like artisanal meat and craft beer, though, restaurateur Christian Pappanicholas (Resto) has created something pretty close to paradise. While there’s a beer store and butcher’s counter for grab-and-go items, chef Michael Berardino’s eat-in food here is best ordered in rounds, pairing beer and bites as you work your way through the 300-odd selections on the drinks list. To go with that smoky Dutch rauchbier, you might begin with wispy shavings of Kentucky ham or with a fat hunk of lamb-neck terrine. If you’re chasing a meal instead of a snack, break up the high-octane meat dishes (roast pig’s head, glistening tartares) with excellent salads, like roasted beets with savory yogurt and whole shelled pistachios.

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Midtown

Perla

Critics' pick

For this West Village hit, restaurateur Gabriel Stulman (Joseph Leonard, Fedora) teamed up with chef Michael Toscano, a talented youngster who caught the eye of the food cognoscenti while running the kitchen at Mario Batali’s meat palace Manzo. The toque has wasted no time in embracing the spotlight here, turning out bold, playful food to match the electric vibe. Pop in early or late for cocktails and snacks at the bar, or settle in for a procession of virtuoso small plates that tease freshness and excitement from humble Italian classics. You might start with cool pieces of lobster served with smeared robiolina and a sprinkle of caviar, then move onto handmade pastas like translucent brown-buttered tortelli with Technicolor ricotta-beet filling. The generous entrées have self-confident swagger, all big, bold proteins under an assertive sear; the best is brined beef tongue, crisp on the edges and supremely tender inside. Desserts, by Toscano too, include an apple-fig upside-down cake that’s like a cross between tarte Tatin and sticky toffee pudding.

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Greenwich Village

RedFarm

Critics' pick

Restaurateur Ed Schoenfeld and head chef Joe Ng (Chinatown Brasserie) offer a playful homage to the golden age of Chinese fine dining at this groundbreaking eatery. The farm-to-table decor makes an unconventional backdrop for a Chinese joint, and the eclectic menu is just as hard to pin down. You might begin with a few old-school Chinese-American bites, like room-temperature shards of extra-crispy orange beef, and playful seafood dumplings dressed up to resemble Pac-Man characters. Some of Ng’s creations can be extraneously showy, but he turns out plenty of hits: slippery duck noodles, a classic oyster sauce stir-fry with black trumpet mushrooms, and a beautiful Creekstone Farms rib eye, all served family-style. In a neighborhood with a dearth of Sino options, RedFarm isn’t just filling a void—it’s reinventing a genre.

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West Village

Tertulia

Critics' pick

At this easygoing taberna, chef Seamus Mullen (Boqueria) offers an idealized spin on old-fashioned Spanish fare, with rustic regional grub and hard cider on tap. Peer into the open kitchen and you’ll get an idea of what’s really at work here—the chef is flanked by a wood-burning grill on one side and by a whole haunch of Iberico ham on the other. This back-to-basics approach rarely draws much attention to itself. Never mind that the pimentón-spiced potatoes have just the right crunch, that the lamb breast is as tender as pork belly and smoky grilled clams arrive to the table right as they’ve popped. The homespun desserts—crispy crêpes rolled around vanilla custard, a fine sweet-and-salty chocolate tart—are just as easy to scarf down without pondering too much. Which is just as it should be.

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West Village

Boulud Sud

Critics' pick

At his most international restaurant yet, superchef Daniel Boulud highlights the new French cuisine of melting-pot cities like Marseille and Nice. With his executive chef, Aaron Chambers (Café Boulud), he casts a wide Mediterranean net—looking to Israel and Egypt, Turkey and Greece. Budget-minded diners can build a full tapas meal from shareable snacks like shelled mussels in a fresh-off-the-vine-tomato ragù with harissa. Heartier dishes combine Gallic finesse with polyglot flavors: Smoky fillets of meaty rouget stuffed with piment d’espelette and fennel nod to the Côte d’Azur, while sweet-spicy chicken tagine and a fragrant bowl of harira lamb soup borrow from the Moroccan pantry. Tunisian-born Ghaya Oliveira’s audacious desserts—such as grapefruit givré stuffed with sorbet, sesame mousse and rose-scented nuggets of Turkish delight—take the exotic mix to even loftier heights.

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Upper West Side

Comments

3 comments
Anita
Anita

I don't agree with NoMad having a higher rating than Blanca. Blanca is damn near perfection; it may be a tad more expensive than NoMad but the food is delicious, the atmosphere is laid-back and quiet unlike the crowd at NoMad.

ddd
ddd

To me, Blanca was way better than NoMad.