Off-Off Broadway shows: New York theater reviews, tickets and listings

Looking for tickets to an Off-Off Broadway show? Use our complete New York theater listings to find reviews, curtain times and great deals on New...

Looking for tickets to an Off-Off Broadway show? Use our complete New York theater listings to find reviews, curtain times and great deals on New York theater tickets.

The Woodsman

Critics' pick

Even before writer, codirector, set- and puppet-designer star James Ortiz asks the audience to “imagine” in a brief prologue, we’ve already been thrust into a dark corner of Oz, where gnarled branches loom and unsettling noises signal danger. Strangemen & Co.’s immersive and practically wordless adaptation of the writings of L. Frank Baum uses low-tech stagecraft like evocative Bunraku puppets (the wicked witch is chilling), haunting vocal sound effects and a lone violinist to tell the backstory of Dorothy’s cherished Tin Man (Ortiz), once a mortal axman who sacrificed an arm and a leg and a whole lot more in the name of love. Emotions are communicated through simple gestures, grunts and glances, not one wasted. Touching on mortality, futility and fate, The Woodsman is a grown-up fairy tale that proves happiness is a worthwhile goal, even if it doesn’t last ever after.—Theater review by Raven Snook The Woodsman. 59E59 (see Off Broadway). By James Ortiz. Based on the writings of L. Frank Baum. Directed by Ortiz and Claire Karpen. With ensemble cast. Running time: 1hr. No intermission.

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59E59 Theaters, Midtown East Until Sunday February 22 2015

The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking

Critics' pick

[Note: The review below is for the version of The Imbible that played at the 2014 New York International Fringe Festival.] Remember Bill Nye the Science Guy? Great! Now imagine him as a bartender who is deeply interested in the history of ethanol alcohol, really likes wigs and costumes, and just joined a coed barbershop quartet. That description of Anthony Caporale’s The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking may sound far-out, but the show is both educational and entertaining. (It's also a fine showcase for a cappella classics arranged by Josh Ehrlich and performed by a gifted ensemble that includes the show's director, soprano Nicole DiMattei.) Mixing whimsy and information, Caporale makes the story of our relationship with alcohol remarkably compelling. And the show's lessons—on subjects like the drinks served at Prohibition-era speakeasies, the origin of the gin and tonic, and the difference between a cocktail and a mixed drink—can be washed down with complimentary, thematically appropriate beverages. As Caporale says, “Trust me, I get funnier with every sip.” That makes the show a must-see for anyone who enjoys free booze, which is probably nearly everyone.—Amelia Bienstock Click here for full TONY coverage of the 2014 New York International Fringe Festival.

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SoHo Playhouse, Soho Until Saturday January 31 2015

Taylor Mac: A 24-Decade History of Popular Music—1900s-1950s

Critics' pick

A Fabergé radical—beautiful, ridiculous and full of hidden tricks—the sublimely freakish Mac pilots audiences through fantastical journeys, guided only by the compass of his magnetic individuality. In this Under the Radar festival offering, he trains his legs for an upcoming marathon 24-hour concert spanning the past 250 years of American music. (The Jan 25 show will last six hours.)

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New York Live Arts, Chelsea

Squirts

Critics' pick

Songwriter, playwright and anticool activist Dan Fishback (The Material World) curates and hosts another two-week exploration of emerging young queer talent, joined by a different local gay luminary each night.

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La MaMa E.T.C., East Village

Wyoming

Buried secrets spill out at an alcohol-soaked family dinner in a new play by Brian Watkins (My Daughter Keeps Our Hammer), directed by Danya Taymor.

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Theater for the New City, East Village Until Saturday January 31 2015

Everybody Gets Cake!

Critics' pick

Everybody Gets Cake: Theater review by David CoteIn your typical clown routine, the face is the place to paste the pastry. But the sneakily weird and delightful Everybody Gets Cake! is too clever for that: Although we see a trim rectangle of frosted goodness at the beginning and end of this hour-long frolic by the group Parallel Exit, it doesn’t get smeared over anyone’s kisser. These zanies are both too kind and too cruel for such baked-goods violence. Zestfully directed by Mark Lonergan on Maruti Evans’s giant-arrow-covered cartoon of a set, Cake is a breathless pastiche of micro-sketches and blackout sight gags stitched together à la Monty Python’s Flying Circus or Laugh-In, with a faint Adult Swim vibe of stoner perversity. It begins somberly enough, with a bent and shuffling old man (Joel Jeske) awaiting a visitor at his nursing home who never comes. This wordless interlude, accompanied by Erik Satie’s ‪Gymnopédie‬ No. 1, strikes a melancholy note that is briskly obliterated by a retro skit about a wide-eyed actor (Danny Gardner) coming to the big city to be a Broadway star. Further silliness arrives via a Noted Shakespearean Actor (Brent McBeth), a slack-lipped Novocaine Abuser (Gardner) and Balloon Man (Jeske), who likes to stuff inflatables under his clothes. One of the more impressive bits involves two musicians (McBeth and Gardner) who “play” the click and swipe functions of their smartphones in “The Handheld Symphony.” Most vignettes last no longer than the time

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59E59 Theaters, Midtown East Until Sunday February 8 2015

No One Loves Us Here

A young Native American unsettles the wealthy household where he is a guest, in a new dark comedy by British playwright Ross Howard, directed by Jerry Heymann for New Light Theater Project.

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Urban Stages, Midtown West Until Saturday February 7 2015

Titus Andronicus

New York Shakespeare Exchange, which worked wonders on the neglected King John a few years ago, takes on another lesser tragedy: the Bard's maximally violent horror show, which wags a finger at eye-for-an-eye justice then hacks off that finger to serve as an appetizer. Ross Williams directs.

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HERE, Soho Until Sunday February 8 2015

The Cutthroat Series: Grand Guignol Duels

The Bats flap their scary wings in the final installment of a series devoted to French horror plays from the turn of the 20th century. This episode comprises the four most popular pieces from the previous ones.

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Flea Theater, Tribeca

Body of Words

Vincent Sessa taps into classical themes in a two-hander about two men—one tired and middle-aged, the other young and athletic—whose prospective sexual encounter in a bungalow veers into deeper territory. John Michael DiResta directs.

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Theater for the New City, East Village

Kentucky Cantata

A young woman is sexually assaulted after moving to New York City in Paul David Young's new play. Kathy Gail MacGowan's production centrally incorporates live music by Ashlée Miller and sets by installation artist Franklin Evans.

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HERE, Soho Until Sunday February 8 2015

Gigi

A rich Parisian falls for a naive girl who is being trained as a courtesan in Anita Loos's 1951 adaptation of Colette's novella. Peter Dobbins directs the revival for his Storm Theatre Company.

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Theatre of the Church of Notre Dame, Upper West Side Until Saturday February 14 2015

Villainous Company

A woman's efforts to retrieve a missing package leads her into a maze of commercial mischief in this three-woman show by Victor L. Cahn, directed by Eric Parness.

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Clurman Theatre (at Theatre Row), Midtown West Until Saturday January 31 2015

Bonedive Scrounger

Fred Backus's latest Brick project combines a blind date, a blocked writer and a bar built on an ancient burial ground. Maggie Cino directs.

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The Brick, Williamsburg Until Saturday January 31 2015

The Human Symphony

Dylan Marron, of the New York Neo-Futurists, selects audience members and guides them through performing a piece drawn from real-life narratives about online dating in NYC.

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New Ohio Theatre, West Village Until Saturday February 14 2015

TMT Stein Lab: When this you see remember me

David Herskovits's brainy troupe, Target Margin Theater, begins its 24th season, devoted to the works of modernist language-scrambler Gertrude Stein. The Lab experiments include works led by Nic Adams, Nehassaiu deGannes, Adam R. Burnett, Megan Hill, Nikki Calonge and Aaron Ethan Green.

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The Bushwick Starr, Bushwick Until Saturday February 7 2015

The Golden Toad

The collaborative downtown mainstays of Talking Band celebrate the company's 40th anniversary with an immersive investigation of modern selfhood, written by founding members Ellen Maddow and Paul Zimet, and directed by Zimet. (There are also songs, by Maddow and Elizabeth Swados.)

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Ellen Stewart Theatre at La MaMa E.T.C., East Village Until Saturday February 7 2015

Modern / Classics

Critics' pick

The usually staid Pearl shakes things up in a new series of readings in which modern writers futz with time-tested works. The hilarious Nick Jones starts things off with Salome of the Moon (Jan 23–25), with a kickass cast that includes Michael Urie, Anne Gridley and Paul Thureen; Oded Gross's take on The Government Inspector (Jan 26–29) and Aaron Posner's Chekhovian Stupid Fu**ing Bird (Jan 30–Feb 1) ensue.

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Pearl Theatre Company, Hell's Kitchen Until Sunday February 1 2015

Brian Dykstra $elling Out

Playwright, actor, comedian and slam poet Brian Dykstra (Hiding Behind Comets) sets his sights on the nefarious effects of money in his latest solo expedition. Margarett Perry directs.

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Playroom Theater, Hell's Kitchen Tuesday January 27 2015 - Tuesday March 3 2015

Cedars

Mirage Theatre Company presents a collection of poetry, prose and music by contemporary Native American writers, directed and adapted by June Prager.

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La MaMa E.T.C., East Village Until Sunday February 1 2015

Zero Hour: Tokyo Rose's Last Tape

Japan Society's 2015 series, Stories from the War: Reflecting on World War II Through Theater, begins with a mystery about a woman who infamously broadcast Japanese propaganda to American soldiers. Photographer Miwa Yagani makes her U.S. theater debut as the piece's writer and director.

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Japan Society, Midtown East Thursday January 29 2015 - Saturday January 31 2015

Mama Rose

Richard E. Waits paints a colorful portrait of his strong-willed mother in a musical solo show directed by Paul Stancato.

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La MaMa E.T.C., East Village Friday January 30 2015 - Sunday February 8 2015

Bad with Money

Critics' pick

Bad with Money. The Duplex (Off-Off Broadway). By Ben Rimalower. Directed by Aaron Mark. With Rimalower. Running time: 1hr. No intermission. Bad with Money: In brief Vividly personal monologist Ben Rimalower follows up on his hit 2012 coming-of-gay tale, Patti Issues, with an account of the dark paths that debt has led him down. Aaron Mark directs. Bad with Money: Theater review by Jenna Scherer There’s so much confessional theater out there, it’s easy to think we’ve gone past fussing over taboos. But there remains one topic that dare not speak its name: money. Solo performer Ben Rimalower (Patti Issues) exorcises his financial demons in this one-man show, a purgative hour-long monologue in which he entertainingly (and excruciatingly) itemizes his monetary sins. Rimalower’s financial odyssey starts out innocently enough: maxing out his low-limit teenage credit card, swiping CDs from the record company where he works. But before long, it’s unreported grand larceny with his boss’s Visa and a gradual erosion of the trust of everyone around him. Rimalower is light, funny and unabashed when he talks about dark stuff such as alcoholism and his foray into prostitution; it’s his compulsive, corrosive spending habits that are the source of shame. “You’re not supposed to talk about money,” he says. “It’s tacky.” Rimalower’s choice to do just that is a brave one, and—in a time when many people suffer in silence under crushing debt or find themselves unable to live within their means—a v

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Wednesday January 28 2015

The Accidental Pervert

Andrew Goffman puts the come back in comedy as he chronicles his 15-year addiction to hard-core pornography in a solo show directed by Charles Messina. Click here for tickets.

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Friday January 30 2015

The Accidental Pervert

Andrew Goffman puts the come back in comedy as he chronicles his 15-year addiction to hard-core pornography in a solo show directed by Charles Messina. Click here for tickets.

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Saturday January 31 2015
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Comments

1 comments
Paulette Kranjac
Paulette Kranjac

Possibility Junkie by David Ippolito. David Ippolito is a very talented American Folk singer, performer and song writer and the together with the ensemble, this show rocks. This is a play worth seeing, speaking to our generation about truth, inner courage, commitment to one another and to our country. See it! Directed by Gretchen Cryer, through Oct 20th.