Best hotels in Chelsea: Where to stay in the area

Hotels in Chelsea run the style gamut from cool minimalism to luxurious opulence—and there's no shortage of new spots to spend a memorable night.

Currently undergoing renovation, the bohemian landmark Chelsea Hotel (officially named Hotel Chelsea) will eventually reopen under the auspices of King & Grove, and boutique accommodations in the neighborhood have multiplied in recent years. Among the best hotels in Chelsea are hipster crash pad Ace Hotel, surreal party base Dream Downtown, the minimalist Hôtel Americano and the elegant NoMad Hotel.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chelsea, New York

Ace Hotel

Critics' pick

Bourgeois hipsters tired of crashing on couches will appreciate the New York outpost of the cool chainlet founded in Seattle by a pair of DJs. The music influence is clear: Many of the rooms in the 1904 building boast playful amenities like functioning turntables, stacks of vinyl and gleaming Gibson guitars. And while you’ll pay for the sprawling loft spaces, there are options for those on a lower budget. The respectable "medium" rooms are outfitted with vintage furniture and original art; even cheaper are the snug bunk-bed setups. Should you find the latter lodging stifling, repair to the buzzing hotel lobby, where DJs or other music-makers are on duty every night; have a drink at the bar, sheltered within a paneled library salvaged from a Madison Avenue apartment, or sip coffee from the Stumptown café—the first in the city from the artisanal Oregon coffee roasters. Guests can also score a table at chef April Bloomfield’s massively popular restaurants, the Breslin Bar & Dining Room and the John Dory Oyster Bar. There’s even an outpost of one of the city’s hippest boutiques, Opening Ceremony, in case you find you haven’t a thing to wear. Rooms: 265.

Read more
Gramercy & Flatiron

Colonial House Inn

This beautifully renovated 1850s townhouse, on a quiet street in Chelsea, is run by (and primarily for) gay men. It's a great place to stay, even if some of the cheaper rooms are a bit snug. Highlights include fireplaces in some superior rooms and both of the new suites, and a roof deck for all where nude sunbathing is allowed. Rooms: 22.

Read more
Chelsea

Dream Downtown

Be sure to pack your totem: Staying at the latest property from hotel wunderkind Vikram Chatwal may make you wonder if you’re in a dream within a Dream. The expansive, tree-shaded lobby, furnished with curvy, metallic-lizard banquettes, and presided over by a DJ nightly, provides an overhead view of swimmers doing laps in the glass-bottomed pool on the terrace above. Housed in the former annex of the New York Maritime Union (now the adjacent Maritime Hotel), the surreal building is riddled with round windows. In the upper-floor rooms, these frame elements of the Manhattan skyline, such as the Empire State Building, in intriguing ways and are picked up by circular mirrors and wallpaper motifs. Quarters combine classic elements (white chesterfield chairs or sofas, Tivoli radios, Turkish rugs) with futuristic touches like shiny steel bathtubs in some rooms. For a mind-blowing gastronomic experience, book one of the ten tables at neurologist-chef Dr. Miguel Sánchez Romera’s eponymous Michelin-starred, subterranean restaurant. The hotel also has a decadent rooftop nightspot, PH-D. Rooms: 316.

Read more
Chelsea

Eventi

This modern 23-floor hotel takes a playful approach to interior design, planting unexpected features in the lobby—a large-scale reproduction of 19th-century British artist Thomas Benjamin Kennington's Autumn peeks out tantalizingly from behind velvet drapes, for instance. Managed by Kimpton, which is known for its informal, friendly ethos, flamboyant decor and nice perks like free evening wine and cheese gatherings, Eventi falls into the moderate price category, yet accommodations are surprisingly luxurious. All of the spacious rooms (which feel even more open thanks to floor-to-ceiling outlooks) have king-size beds, outfitted with dapper gray fabric headboards and Frette linens. Cool marble bathrooms are stocked with swanky Etro products. For an on-site bite, choose between the sprawling, futuristic Bar Basque, designed by Blade Runner set designer Syd Mead, and Jeffrey Chodorow’s FoodParc, a high-tech, upscale take on a shopping-mall food court. There's also a spa. Rooms: 292.

Read more
Chelsea

Hôtel Americano

You won’t find any Talavera tiles in Grupo Habita’s first property outside Mexico. Mexican architect Enrique Norten’s sleek, mesh-encased structure stands alongside the High Line. The decor evokes classic midcentury American style, interpreted by a European (Colette designer Arnaud Montigny). The minimalist rooms have Japanese-style platform beds, iPads and, in one of several subtle nods to U.S. culture, super-soft denim bathrobes. After a day of gallery-hopping, get an even more elevated view of the neighborhood from the rooftop bar and grill, where a petite pool does double duty as a hot tub in winter. There’s also a ground-floor eatery, helmed by a former Daniel chef, and two subterranean bars.

Read more
Chelsea

The Inn on 23rd

This renovated 19th-century town house offers the charm of a traditional bed and breakfast with enhanced amenities (an elevator, pillowtop mattresses, private bathrooms, white-noise machines). Owners and innkeepers Annette and Barry Fisherman have styled each of the 14 bedrooms with a unique theme, such as Maritime, Bamboo and the 1940s. One of its best attributes is the "library," a cozy jumble of tables and chairs open 24/7 to guests for coffee and tea; there are also wine and cheese receptions on Friday and Saturday evenings. Another nice perk: A free pass to your choice of one of several major museums is thrown in. The owners have just opened a modern American brasserie on the ground floor. Rooms: 14.

Read more
Chelsea

Maritime Hotel

Steve Zissou would feel at home at this nautically themed hotel (the former HQ of the New York Maritime Union), which is outfitted with self-consciously hip details befitting a Wes Anderson film. Standard rooms are modeled on cruise cabins; lined with teak paneling and sporting a single porthole window, they’re small but well appointed (C.O. Bigelow products in the bathroom, a Kiki de Montparnasse ‘pleasure kit’ in the minibar, a well-curated DVD collection available by phone). The hotel’s busy Italian restaurant, La Bottega, also supplies room service, and the adjoining bar hosts a crowd of models and mortals, who throng the umbrella-lined patio in warmer weather. In the basement, Matsuri offers sushi, Japanese tapas and the city’s only sake sommelier. Rooms 126.

Read more
Chelsea

The NoMad Hotel

Critics' pick

A block south of hipster hub the Ace Hotel, the NoMad heralds what may finally emerge as a bona fide ’hood: North of Madison Square Park. The properties share a developer, and like the Ace, the NoMad is a self-contained microcosm encompassing destination dining—courtesy of Daniel Humm and Will Guidara, of Michelin-three-starred Eleven Madison Park—and the first stateside outpost of Parisian concept store Maison Kitsuné. Struck by the Haussmannesque facade of the 1903 limestone building (a former corporate HQ), owner Andrew Zobler enlisted Jacques Garcia, known for designing celebrated rue Saint-Honoré A-list crash pad Hôtel Costes to create the opulent interiors. Original features in the public spaces, such as elaborate ceiling moldings and mosaic tile floors, have been meticulously restored. After seeing a photograph in a design book of a Paris apartment Garcia occupied in his twenties, Zobler encouraged him to bring the same lived-in bohemian style to the hotel’s guest quarters. Vintage Heriz rugs soften the weathered maple floor, salvaged from a 1905 factory. In keeping with the residential aesthetic, the wall concealing the loo and shower cubicle is dressed up as a damask “screen.” Many rooms feature old-fashioned claw-foot bathtubs, and the exclusive argan-oil products were supplied by provençal perfumer and lifestyle brand Côté Bastide. Each room has its own art collection, built on the theme of travel around photographs, sketches and correspondence amassed from French antique shops. Rooms: 168.

Read more
Chelsea

Comments

1 comments