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Petersen Automotive Museum

  • Museums
  • Miracle Mile
  • price 2 of 4
  • Recommended
  1. Photograph: Courtesy Petersen Automotive Museum
    Photograph: Courtesy Petersen Automotive Museum
  2. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  3. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  4. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  5. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  6. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  7. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  8. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  9. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  10. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  11. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
  12. Photograph: Michael Juliano
    Photograph: Michael JulianoThe Petersen Automotive Museum.
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Time Out Says

Miracle Mile was the first commercial development in LA designed expressly for the benefit of drivers, and so a former department store makes an apt home for this museum of car culture. A 2015 redesign has since turned the automotive history museum into more of a high-tech gallery, with about 150 cars on display. There's a glimpse into the rise of car culture in Southern California, but that mostly takes a backseat to a focus on the progress, dominance and dazzling good looks of the automobile.

The museum's narrative begins in the third floor gallery with a bit of automotive history; you'll find sections dedicated to Southern California road culture and Hollywood cars, from the Tim Burton era Batmobile to Walter White's Pontiac Aztek. Head down a level and you'll learn about the industrial design process from start to finish; an on-hand Art Center design studio makes the motif feel especially alive. The ground floor shows off the artistry of cars, with a showroom dedicated to sumptuously swooping vintage vehicles. Make no mistake, though: all of the floors are essentially about the art fo the automobile, just viewed through various lenses.

Technology, both automotive and interactive, runs through the museum's redesigned gallery spaces; most significantly, they've ditched wordy didactics in favor of tablets in many spots. You'll find Forza 6 driving simulation stations and a Cars-inspired discovery center on the second floor, complete with an augmented reality experience that takes visitors on a car-building scavenger hunt around the space. Though the museum has 96 tablets available for the Cars experience, we suggest reserving a time slot in advance.

Details

Address:
6060 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles
90036
Price:
$15; seniors $12; students (with ID) $12; children $7; children under 3 free; active military (with ID) free; parking free for the first 30 minutes with validation, $12 flat rate after
Opening hours:
Daily 10am-6pm
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What's On

Bond in Motion

  • Exhibitions

Play “Q” for the day at this assembly of some of the most famous gadget-adorned vehicles to appear in 007 films. The Petersen has put together a collection of 30 cars, motorcycles, boats, submarines, helicopters and scale filming models of aircraft from six decades of James Bond movies. Highlights include the 1977 Lotus Esprit S1 Submarine from The Spy Who Loved Me, a 1999 BMW Z8 from The World Is Not Enough and the 2019 Aston Martin DB10 from Spectre.

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