Deconstruct / Reconstruct // Amy Hartelust // Chloe York // Visitors Center Gallery

Things to do
0 Love It
Save it
Deconstruct / Reconstruct // Amy Hartelust // Chloe York // Visitors Center Gallery
More Less
Memphis Botanic Garden says
SHOW DATES JUNE 4 - 30
OPENING RECEPTION JUNE 6, 5:30-7:30pm

DECONSTRUCT / RECONSTRUCT
Amy Hartelust and Chloe York
presented by Paragon Bank.

CHLOE YORK
"Compared to other species, humans display fears about
personal appearance in ways that no other creature does, but
there are similarities in the desire of animals to camouflage
and defend themselves from predators and to alter their
appearance in order to attract a mate. One such creature is the
decorator crab. The decorator crab collects bits of its
surroundings like vegetation, coral and smaller organisms and
covers its entire body, camouflaging itself. Inspired by this
creature’s practice and my love/hate relationship with
altering my own appearance, I paint stylized, androgynous
human figures that are almost unrecognizable with all the
oceanic patterns and forms covering their bodies. In this series,
the human form has been reconstructed. The surface of each
painting is inviting, but also confusing and tumultuous,
challenging the idea that decorating oneself is as advantageous
as many of us have been led to believe."

AMY HARTELUST
“Landscape is an ever-changing form. The elements of
nature leave marks and impressions on the landscapes we see,
subtly altering them, until over time they have in a sense been
both destroyed and renewed. I try to convey this same sense of
renewal by using layers and textures in my work, deconstructing landscapes to their simplest forms in order to highlight subtle changes in color, texture, and application. I have even painted over “failed” works to create movement and change in my landscapes. Using the uneven texture of an original work as the foundation for a new piece imbues the new piece with a depth it wouldn’t have otherwise, while redeeming the “failed” piece, giving it new life.

My landscapes serve as a metaphor for how humans change
through the weathering of our experiences, how these scars
inform our ever-changing identity. I have found this principle
of renewal through change can be seen in the progression of
my own life and work: though my work has evolved over the
years, you can still see the foundational elements of where I
started as an artist.”
More Less

By: Memphis Botanic Garden

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/133259840412498
To improve this listing email: feedback@timeout.com