The best African restaurants

Our handy guide brings you all the best African food in the French capital, from Ethiopian to South African, Algerian to Ivorian
The best African restaurants in Paris
© Time Out
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Fancy some spice on your plate? We suggest you try one of these hand-picked restaurants from across the African continent. Whether you’re hankering after a chicken tagine, a spicy merguez couscous, succulent strips of biltong or tangy Ethiopian pancakes, sustenance is nigh with our list of the best African restaurants in Paris…

Where to eat North African

Chez Omar

icon-location-pin Le Marais

The once-fashionable Omar doesn’t take reservations, and the queue can stretch the length of the zinc bar and through the door. Everyone is waiting for the same thing: couscous. Prices range from €11 (vegetarian) to €24 (royale); there are no tagines or other traditional Maghreb mains, only a handful of French classics (duck, fish, steak)...

Restaurants, Mediterranean

Les 4 frères

icon-location-pin 10e arrondissement

These four brothers specialise in kebabs and couscous, with their showpiece being the ‘4 frères’ meal of 16 skewers (four each of liver, lamb, beef and merguez) at €17.50. You can also order any selection of skewers (all halal) either on their own or with couscous (from €6)...

Time Out says
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Le Souk

icon-location-pin Roquette

Potted olive trees mark the entrance to this lively den of Moroccan cuisine. Start with savoury b’stilla, a pasty stuffed with duck, raisins and nuts, flavoured with orange-blossom water and sprinkled with cinnamon and powdered sugar. Don't fill up, though, as the first-rate tagines and couscous are enormous...

Les Caves du Petit Thouars

icon-location-pin Le Marais

Enjoy homemade dishes like marinated chicken skewers, tender rump steak with pepper sauce, or grilled lamb chops: good, simple and plentiful, it only costs around €10 for lunch or dinner (an extraordinary feat), and comes with thick-cut chips and homemade sauces. The Berber family who run the place also put on couscous dishes for lunch...

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Restaurants, Moroccan

La Médina du Marais

icon-location-pin 3e arrondissement

Traditional eastern cosiness characterises La Medina du Marais, a rather romantic North African restaurant on Rue des Gravilliers between Etienne Marcel and Arts et Metiers Metro stations in the hip Marais area of central Paris. Wood beam ceiling, stone walls filled with oriental objects, candles on each table – it’s a seductive, laidback scene...

Restaurants, Moroccan

Le 404

icon-location-pin 3e arrondissement

404 restaurant in Paris’ supercool Marais exhibits all the vibrant flavours and colours of North Africa. The menu features well-executed dishes like couscous, tagines, and grilled meats. The wine list also offers some unusual (and rather good) Mahgrebi bottles...

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Restaurants, Moroccan

Le Petit Bleu

icon-location-pin Montmartre

A well-kept little gem of a secret: Le Petit Bleu doesn’t look like much, but it is absolutely delightful. A Moroccan canteen tucked away in a Montmartre back street, they serve perfect couscous, tagines and grills in enormous portions – it would be difficult to find better in the city...

Restaurants, Moroccan

L’Homme Bleu

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

L’Homme Bleu’s simple, welcoming ambiance is the perfect background for the restaurant's superior Maghreb cooking. Here, cooks busy themselves in the kitchen while the meat grills slowly on the fire and regulars jostle for space – it might not look like much from the outside, but the full tables tell you all you need to know...

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Restaurants, Algerian

L’Alcôve

icon-location-pin Plaisance

This former butcher’s has lost none of its carnivorous appetite: since its conversion into a restaurant back in 2010, L’Alcôve has been serving a saliva-inducing range of Maghrebian grills to locals in the know. The venue itself, innocuously squeezed between a sushi place and a grocer’s, is more kebab joint than restaurant proper...

Where to eat West African

Ohinéné @JS
Restaurants

Ohinéné

icon-location-pin 20e arrondissement

Thanks to its striking red and black shop front, Côte d’Ivoire restaurant Ohinéné in the 20th arrondissement is pretty unmissable – just like its spice and flavour-packed West African menu, which is full of exciting Ivorian treats....

Time Out says
Restaurants, Global

Le Petit Dakar

icon-location-pin Le Marais

So many factors combine to make an evening at Senegalese restaurant Le Petit Dakar, nestled down a small street in the Marais, such a memorable one. Whether it’s the delightful Wolof music playing in the background, the colourful art hung from the walls, or the alluring smells wafting out from the kitchen, everything is brilliant...

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Restaurants

Le Dibi

icon-location-pin Goutte d'Or

Standouts from the menu include various sauce-based dishes like the thiebou tienneu (fish in a tomato and carrot sauce, accompanied by wholegrain rice) and the beef mafé, with its unctuous peanut plant sauce served on a generous bed of sticky white rice...

Time Out says
@ER
Restaurants

L’Equateur

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

At L’Equateur there’s an incredibly wide range of treats to try from Cameroon, Senegal and also the Caribbean, including classics like mafé (peanut butter stew), yassa (a chicken dish), tiep bou dien (fish and rice), salt cod fritters and stuffed crab...

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Restaurants, North African

Rio dos Camaraos

icon-location-pin Paris et sa banlieue

Not far from central Paris, Rio dos Camaros stands out from the many dodgy outfits one can find in the north of the capital. Set on a quiet street with a wooden deck overlooking the cobbles, it’s an appealing proposition. Once inside, the kitchen is hidden behind a wall of spices and heat, and from it issues forth a stream of maafe (Wolof for 'groundnut stew’)...

Time Out says

Where to eat East African

Restaurants, Ethiopian

Godjo

icon-location-pin Quartier latin

With its tiny, jolly, shabby ground floor dining room and basement full of cushioned lounge seats and low tables, Ethiopian restaurant Godjo has the air of a well-kept secret – although the secret has been out for some time, and there are queues down the street on weekend evenings...

©Stipene Pirbay
Restaurants, Eritrean

Massawa

icon-location-pin Gare de l'Est

If you’re unsure what Eritrean cuisine actually consists of, we say opt for the bebeaynetu, an immense platter that allows customers to sample a little bit of pretty much everything. Luckily for inelegant or reluctant cutlery-wielders, here it’s customary to eat the traditional way, scooping up every dish with the large crispy flat breads that come with every main...

Time Out says

Where to eat South African

Restaurants, South African

My Food

icon-location-pin Paris et sa banlieue

The clutter of big game figurines, tribal wall hangings and piles of biltong on the bar make South African restaurant My Food an unusual escape from the drab Montreuil pavements outside. Genial, bearded, barbecue-savvy owner Kobus Botha serves up huge plates of expertly grilled meat, homemade chips and traditional recipes...

Where to get brunch

Bars and pubs, Cocktail bars

Comptoir Général

icon-location-pin Canal Saint-Martin

Hipsters, boho-chic types and families are all tumbled in together here – a varied but very Parisian mix. We love the atmosphere of the place and its amazing setting, with its odd assortment of armchairs, affordable cocktails, blues and jazz soundtrack and menu of inexpensive Asian dishes...

For a bit of everything

waly fay resto africain paris
DR / © Waly Fay
Restaurants

Waly Fay

icon-location-pin Roquette

Welcome to Waly Fay, where those in the know come to dine on dishes from across West Africa and the Antilles. Regulars navigate the menu of accra, boudin, mafé, thiep, yassa and n’dole cuisines with ease, while newbies are guided along by the helpful staff...

Time Out says
Restaurants, Global

Jambo

icon-location-pin 10e arrondissement

The most striking restaurant in the area may well be Jambo (‘hello’ in Swahili), with its garish yellow façade, orange logo and the various decorative masks and shields inside. With no physical menu to speak of, the staff will recite the day’s offerings on the spot, starting with entrees like a fresh and lemony dish of Zanzibar-style samosas...

Time Out says
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